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According to a new study accepted for publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, obese teenage girls with a greater ratio of visceral fat (fat around internal organs) to subcutaneous fat (fat found just beneath the skin) are likely to have lower bone density than peers with a lower ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat.

Different fat types can help or hinder obese girls' bone health

01/Mar/2010

According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, obese teenage girls with a greater ratio of visceral fat (fat around internal organs) to subcutaneous fat (fat found just beneath the skin) are likely to have lower bone density than peers with a lower ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat.

"Visceral fat is known to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease in obese people," said Madhusmita Misra, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital and senior author of the study. "Our study suggests that visceral fat may also have an impact on bone health. This finding is particularly relevant given the rising prevalence of obesity and recent studies suggesting a higher risk of fractures in some obese individuals."

Link to full Endocrine Society release. 

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