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Genes make up only a tiny percentage of the human genome, but the rest may hold vital clues about the genetic origins of disease. Using a new mapping strategy, a research team has begun to assign meaning to the regions beyond our genes and has revealed how minute changes in these regions might be connected to common diseases.

Epigenomic findings illuminate veiled variants

23/Mar/2011

Genes make up only a tiny percentage of the human genome. The rest, which has remained measurable but mysterious, may hold vital clues about the genetic origins of disease. Using a new mapping strategy, a collaborative team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and MIT has begun to assign meaning to the regions beyond our genes and has revealed how minute changes in these regions might be connected to common diseases. The researchers’ findings appear in the March 23 advance online issue of Nature.

The results have implications for interpreting genome-wide association studies – large-scale studies of hundreds or thousands of people in which scientists look across the genome for single “letter” changes or SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) that influence the risk of developing a particular disease. The majority of SNPs associated with disease reside outside of genes and until now, very little was known about the functions of most of them.

Link to full Broad Institute release on study led by MGH investigator Bradley Bernstein.

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