Thursday, October 26, 2017

Resistance to checkpoint blockade therapy through inactivation of antigen presentation

Resistance to Checkpoint Blockade Therapy Through Inactivation of Antigen Presentation
Sade-Feldman M, Jiao YJ, Chen JH, Rooney MS, Barzily-Rokni M, Eliane JP, [et al.] Flaherty KT, Sullivan RJ, Hacohen N

Published in Nature Communications on October 26, 2017

Cancer therapy has been transformed in the last few years by immune-based therapies, called 'checkpoint blockade' therapies. An important question is why some people respond and others do not respond to this therapy. By analyzing the DNA of tumors from patients who developed resistance to checkpoint therapy, we found changes in the DNA of a key gene that is critical for tumors to be detected by the immune system. In this way, the tumor has learned how to hide from the immunotherapy. Knowing this will help us decide which patients would benefit from immune therapy. Finding ways to make these resistant tumors visible to the immune system is an important goal for the coming years. Read more here.

(Summary submitted by Nir Hacohen, PhD, of the Mass General Cancer Center)

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