Overview

The mission of the Mass General Cellular Immunotherapy Program is to invent, develop, administer, and understand engineered immune effector cells. Our approach is to expand cellular engineering and immunotherapy research by bringing together physicians and laboratory scientists focused on immune cell engineering and its clinical effects. We aim to enhance the cohesion between biological, translational, and clinical aspects of cell engineering to implement safe and potent immunotherapies, with the ultimate goal of developing curative treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Our objectives:

  • Bring together clinical researchers who administer, manage, and/or investigate immune effector cells as a therapeutic modality
  • Enable translational research and collaboration
  • Optimize immune monitoring and laboratory correlatives of clinical observations
  • Promote cellular therapy education through education sessions
  • Provide high quality care and management of patients receiving cellular therapies
  • Obtain and maintain FACT accreditation for the administration of immune effector cells
  • Invent and develop novel forms of cellular engineering that will become the next generation of immune cell therapies

 

Watch how Mass General patient Jenn Gilmann has already benefited from immunotherapy.

Team

Leadership
Maus Laboratory
Clinical Investigators
Immune Monitoring Laboratory
Blood Transfusion Service
Cellular Therapy and Transplantation Laboratory

Leadership

The Cellular Immunotherapy Program is lead by Marcela Maus, MD, PhD.

  • Marcela Maus, MD, PhD

    Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

    Marcela Maus, MD, PhD, is Director of the Cellular Immunotherapy Program and a member of the Center for Cancer Immunology at Mass General. Her work aims to understand and engineer novel forms of cellular therapies – using cells normally produced by our bodies – to treat patients with cancer. Cellular therapies have achieved unprecedented, durable responses in some blood cancers, particularly CAR-T cell therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results demonstrate the tremendous power of engineering the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, and effect long-term clinical benefit. However, to be able to harness this power of the cellular immune system in other cancers, there is a need to identify and validate new targets, and to develop ways of enhancing both the safety and effectiveness of imperfect targets. Dr. Maus is building the Cellular Immunotherapy Program to create new and improved treatments for patients with leukemia, myeloma and brain tumors initially, but hopes to expand the program over time to cover numerous tumor types.

 

Maus Laboratory

The goal of the Maus lab is to design and evaluate next generation genetically-modified (CAR) T cells as immunotherapy in patients with cancer. Learn more.

Maus lab team members in Cape Cod.

 

Clinical Investigators

To bring therapies to patients, a dedicated team of early-phase clinical investigators in oncology play a central role in cancer immunology at Mass General.

 

Immune Monitoring Laboratory

The Immune Monitoring Laboratory is an essential and integral part of the Cellular Immunotherapy Program. The laboratory provides expertise to enable translational clinical studies of immune-based therapies, based on the highest standard operating systems. Learn more.

 

Blood Transfusion Service

The Blood Transfusion Service is an FDA-licensed, full-service blood bank that consists of the Blood Donor Center, the Outpatient Infusion Unit, the Apheresis Unit, the Transfusion Service, and the Histocompatibility (HLA) Laboratory. Learn more.

 

Cellular Therapy and Transplantation Laboratory

The Mass General Cancer Center’s Cellular Therapeutics and Transplantation Laboratory (CTTL) is comprised of a team of medical technologists that provide support to the Bone Marrow Transplant Program. These technologists play an integral part in stem cell processing, transplant infusions and bone marrow harvests. Technologists also participate in numerous immunotherapy clinical trials to aid in the progression of research and improve patients’ lives. Learn more.

CTTL team members.

Clinical Trials

View Cellular Therapy clinical trials.


CAR T-cell Therapy for Lymphoma: Yescarta

The Mass General Cancer Center is an authorized treatment center for Yescarta (axicabtagene ciloleucel), FDA approved CAR T-cell therapy for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma. Learn more here.

News & Resources

Featured Articles & Publications

Immunotherapy Effort Seeks New Cancer Targets

A new immunotherapy program at the Mass General Cancer Center is using engineered cells from the human immune system as powerful living drugs.

Immunotherapy Efforts Advances on Multiple Fronts

The Center for Cancer Immunology’s investigators are working to expand the use of immunotherapy, a revolutionary approach to cancer therapy.

CAR T-cell Therapy for Lymphoma: Yescarta

The Mass General Cancer Center is an authorized treatment center for Yescarta, FDA approved CAR T-cell therapy for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma. Learn more here.

FACT information

Honors & Awards

Cellular Immunotherapy Program team members selected as 2017 MGH the one hundred honorees for their commitment to the fight against cancer.

  • Marcela V. Maus, MD, PhD

    As the director of the Cellular Immunotherapy Program at the Mass General Cancer Center, Marcela Maus, MD, PhD, is following a childhood dream of fixing genes gone wrong in the pursuit of a cure for cancer.

    Marcela V. Maus, MD, PhD

    Using the immune system as a cancer treatment has the potential to induce long-term, durable remissions, and perhaps even cures for some patients. Dr. Maus realizes the incredible potential of this kind of treatment. She’s working to create new and improved immunotherapy treatments for patients with leukemia, multiple myeloma and brain tumors initially, but hopes to expand the program over time to cover numerous tumor types. “Over the years, I’ve become a specialist in T cells, which have three amazing and important properties. They can kill other cells they see as a target; they can be turned on and off by specific signals; and they stick around for your whole life. I want to get to know T cells very well, how they work, and how we can get them on our side,” Dr. Maus explains. “Enlisting and directing T cells has the potential to cure cancer, which is a crazy ambitious goal, but that is my dream.”

  • Cellular Therapy and Transplantation Laboratory
    The Mass General Cancer Center’s Cellular Therapeutics and Transplantation Laboratory (CTTL) is comprised of a team of medical technologists that provide support to the Bone Marrow Transplant Program. These technologists play an integral part in stem cell processing, transplant infusions and bone marrow harvests. Technologists also participate in numerous immunotherapy clinical trials to aid in the progression of research and improve patients’ lives.

    Madison M. Hebert, Cellular Immunotherapy Program Coordinator, is also directly responsible for coordinating research with the Cellular Therapeutics and Transplantation Laboratory. The entire Cellular Therapeutics and Transplantation Laboratory was an honoree at the MGH 100 2017 gala.

Contact & How to Help

Contact the Mass General Hospital Cellular Immunotherapy Program
Email: MGHCIP@mgh.harvard.edu

Support the Cellular Immunotherapy Program

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