Cardiology Division

Browse our news or find information on upcoming events in the Cardiology Division.

03/28/2014: Cardiovascular Images Newsletter

Cardiovascular Images is a web-based monthly newsletter produced jointly by the Department of Radiology and the Department of Cardiology. Presented in case-study format and with plenty of actual clinical images, the newsletter provides physicians and healthcare professionals with factual and up-to-date information about cardiovascular examinations and procedures.

02/07/2014: Heart smarts

In recognition of American Heart Month, MGH physicians share their tips for the best ways to "love your heart."

02/07/2014: DeSanctis departs after 59 years

Roman DeSanctis, MD, director of Clinical Cardiology emeritus at the MGH, retires.

10/29/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital researchers identify identify biomarker to predict diabetes risk

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care and Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute have found a chemical biomarker in blood that can predict diabetes risk more than a decade before the onset of the disease.

07/16/2013: #1 in New England, #2 in the nation

U.S. News & World Report ranks Massachusetts General Hospital among the top hospitals in America based on our quality of care, patient safety and reputation in 16 specialties.

07/12/2013: Study combines two minimally invasive procedures to treat atrial fibrillation

A new clinical trial is now underway at the MGH to investigate whether combining two catheter-based procedures will improve the long-term outcome in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. The MGH is the first hospital in New England – and only the second in the nation – to pair renal artery sympathetic denervation with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension.

07/12/2013: Recognizing excellence in research

Friends and colleagues gathered on June 18 to celebrate the second annual Herman K. “Chip” Gold, MD, MGH Young Investigator Award.

07/01/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital combines two minimally invasive procedures to treat atrial fibrillation

A new clinical trial is now underway at the Massachusetts General Hospital to investigate whether combining two endovascular catheter-based procedures will improve the long-term outcome in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. Mass General is the first hospital in New England – and only the second in the nation – to pair renal artery sympathetic denervation with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension.

09/14/2012: Institute hosts ‘Health Information Day’

Designed to introduce the MGH community to the new interdisciplinary Institute, "Health Information Day" Sept. 12 featured informational sessions, panel discussions, hands-on demonstrations, samples from area food trucks and promotional giveaways.

09/07/2012: Collaborative caring

To introduce the Institute of Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care to the MGH community, “Health Information Day” will be held Sept. 12 from 7 am to 8 pm under the Bulfinch Tents.

07/09/2012: Choice to use drug-eluting stents has little relation to patients' probable benefit

A new study finds that the use of drug-eluting stents after angioplasty bears little relationship to patients' predicted risk of restenosis (reblockage) of the treated coronary artery, the situation the devices are designed to prevent.

06/29/2012: Inaugural award honors former director of Cardiac Cath Lab

Cardiology Division staff members, grateful patients, family members and friends gathered to celebrate the inaugural Herman K. “Chip” Gold, MD, MGH Young Investigator Award during a June 19 reception and ceremony in the East Garden Room.

02/22/2012: Widening Geographic Disparities in Hospitalized Heart Attack Incidence and Outcome Rates

February is American Heart Month, and the spotlight is on heart health. Throughout this month, we will be featuring articles including discussions with physicians in the Massachusetts General Heart Center to learn more about the topics surrounding heart disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S. for both men and women.

02/10/2012: Statin Effects in Women:

February is American Heart Month, and the spotlight is on heart health. Throughout this month, we will be featuring articles including discussions with physicians in the Massachusetts General Heart Center to learn more about the topics surrounding heart disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S. for both men and women.

01/11/2012: Participating in marathons, half-marathons not found to increase risk of cardiac arrest

A new study finds that participating in these races actually is associated with a relatively low risk of cardiac arrest, compared to other forms of athletics. The study also identifies bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation as a key factor in patient survival.

11/29/2011: Are caffeine inhalers safe?

Kimberly A. Parks, DO, FACC, cardiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and James Mojica, MD, associate program director of the Harvard Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Training Program discuss the safety of caffeine inhalers

11/06/2011: Combined arterial imaging technology reveals both structural and metabolic details

A new device that combines two microimaging technologies can reveal both the detailed anatomy of arterial linings and biological activities that, in coronary arteries, could indicate the risk of heart attacks or the formation of clots in arterial stents.

10/17/2011: Biomarker-guided heart failure treatment significantly reduces complications

Adding regular testing for blood levels of a biomarker of cardiac distress to standard care for the most common form of heart failure may significantly reduce the incidence of cardiovascular complications, a new MGH study finds.

04/01/2011: Seconds count

MGH Hotline 4.1.11 From the time a person first experiences symptoms of a heart attack, such as shortness of breath or chest discomfort, to the time he or she undergoes cardiac catheterization -- a procedure used to diagnose and treat a blocked coronary artery -- every second is of utmost importance.

03/20/2011: Metabolite levels may be able to improve diabetes risk prediction

Measuring the levels of small molecules in the blood may be able to identify individuals at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes as much as a decade before symptoms of the disorder appear.

03/06/2011: International collaborative identifies 13 new heart-disease-associated gene sites

An international research collaboration has identified 13 new gene sites associated with the risk of coronary artery disease and validated 10 sites found in previous studies. Several of the novel sites discovered do not appear to relate to known risk factors, suggesting previously unsuspected mechanisms for cardiovascular disease.

02/18/2011: MGH goes red for women’s heart health

MGH Hotline 2.18.11 Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the MGH Heart Center and Corrigan Women’s Heart Health Program brought attention to hearts everywhere by celebrating “Go Red for Women” month with a series of events and activities to raise awareness of heart disease in women.

01/21/2011: "Go Red for Women" events

MGH Hotline 1.21.11 The MGH Heart Center's Corrigan Women's Heart Health Program is hosting several events in honor of the American Heart Association's "Go Red for Women" week Feb. 1 through 4.

08/04/2010: Sorting out the genetic and biological links between cholesterol and coronary heart disease

Two papers in the current issue of Nature describe 95 gene variations that contribute to cholesterol and triglyceride levels and reveal the unexpected role of a metabolic pathway in lipid metabolism.

06/09/2010: Genome-wide study identifies factors that may affect vitamin D levels

An international research consortium has identified four common gene variants that are associated with blood levels of vitamin D and with an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency.

06/09/2010: Heart Attacks Declined 24 Percent in Kaiser Permanente Northern California Since 2000

Heart attacks declined by 24 percent within a large, ethnically diverse, community-based population since 2000, and the relative incidence of serious heart attacks that do permanent damage declined by 62 percent, according to a study in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

05/26/2010: Detailed metabolic profile gives "chemical snapshot" of the effects of exercise

Using a system that analyzes blood samples with unprecedented detail, a team led by MGH researchers has developed the first "chemical snapshot" of the metabolic effects of exercise.

04/02/2010: A life-saving gift

MGH Hotline 4.2.10 IN THE UNITED STATES ALONE, there are more than 100,000 candidates on the United Network for Organ Sharing organ and tissue waiting list.

03/01/2010: Adding ECG to health exams may prevent sudden cardiac death in young athletes

A new study by researchers at the MGH Heart Center found the addition of electrocardiogram testing to the standard medical history and physical examination for young athletes may better identify key cardiovascular abnormalities responsible for sports-related sudden death.

02/21/2010: Common gene variant may increase risk for a type of cardiac arrhythmia

An international research team has identified a common gene variant associated with a form of the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that is seen in younger individuals with no other heart disease.

09/23/2009: Mass General raises funds to support cardiovascular research

Massachusetts General Hospital partnered with the American Heart Association during the 2009 Boston Heart Walk, an event that raises funds to support lifesaving heart and stroke research.

07/16/2009: Monitoring patients remotely

New wireless technology allows Heart Center clinicians to keep tabs on heart failure patients wherever they are

03/23/2009: Common gene variants influence risk factor for sudden cardiac death

A new study has identified several common genetic variants related to a risk factor for sudden cardiac death. The report receiving early online release in the journal Nature Genetics identifies variants in genes, some known and some newly discovered, that influence the QT interval measured on the electrocardiogram (EKG) performed routinely in doctors’ offices.

02/15/2009: Common gene variants increase risk of hypertension, finding may lead to new therapies

A new study has identified the first common gene variants associated with an increased incidence of hypertension – a significant risk factor for heart attack, stroke and kidney failure.

02/08/2009: International study identifies gene variants associated with early heart attack

The largest study ever completed of genetic factors associated with heart attacks has identified nine genetic regions - three not previously described - that appear to increase the risk for early-onset myocardial infarction.

Cardiovascular Images
04/29/2013: Cardiovascular Images

Atrial Baffle Stenosis: A Late Complication after Mustard Repair for d-TGA
A 37 year old male with a history of d-transposition of the great arteries and Mustard atrial switch operation as an infant presented with abdominal distension and facial swelling.
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MGH Fund Update Summer 2011
09/01/2011: MGH Fund Update Summer 2011

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The MGH Fund Update is a publication for supporters of the MGH Fund, Mass General's fundamental resource for providing life-saving patient care, advancing biomedical research, and creating healthcare solutions in our community and around the globe.

05/12/2014: Adult Congenital Heart Disease 2014

Specialists from the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care present a comprehensive symposium on the practice gap in treating adult congenital heart disease (ACHD).

12/16/2009: Cardiology Grand Rounds

Listen to Ira Ockene, MD, discuss "The Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project: What is Translational Research so Difficult?"

12/09/2009: Cardiology Grand Rounds

Listen to Richard N. Channick, MD, discuss "Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Current Approaches and Controversies"

12/02/2009: Cardiology Grand Rounds

Listen to Michael A. Fifer, MD, discuss "HCM - the Most Interesting Heart Disease"

Advanced research on coronary artery disease

In a segment produced by ABC News, Thomas Wang, MD, cardiologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center, explains some of the innovative research done on the root causes of coronary artery disease.

Risk factors for heart disease

Risk factors for heart disease include smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, family history of heart disease and high cholesterol. Learn what you can do to overcome your risk for heart disease.

Malissa Wood, MD, explains how the symptoms of heart attack are different in women than in men

Malissa Wood, MD, Co-Director of the Corrigan Women's Heart Health Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center describes the heart attack symptoms that are unique to women, and why treatment of heart disease should be gender-specific.

Sekar Kathiresan, MD, explains what you can do to lower your risk of developing coronary artery disease

Sekar Kathiresan, MD, Director of Preventive Cardiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center says counteracting your genetic risk is within your control. Learn more about coronary artery disease, who is most at risk and about Mass General's Heart Attack Prevention Program, focused on people with a family history of the disease.

Aaron Baggish, MD, warns that even highly active people can develop heart disease

Aaron Baggish, MD, Associate Director for the Cardiovascular Performance Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center explains how heart problems are diagnosed in highly active people and how Mass General specialists help them exercise safely to reduce the risk of heart attack.

Stephanie Moore, MD, describes your risk for heart failure if you have a family history of this condition

Stephanie Moore, MD, cardiologist in the Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program at the Mass General Heart Center says if a close relative suffered from heart failure, you should be screened for other health issues that can put you at higher risk. Learn more about the early signs of heart failure and the various treatments available, from medications to pacemakers to transplants.

Dr. Patrick Ellinor, cardiologist at the Mass General Heart Center, says you should discuss your condition with your doctor

Dr. Patrick Ellinor, cardiologist at the Mass General Heart Center, says you should discuss your condition with your doctor, since many people who could benefit from specific treatments are not aware of them.