Opportunities for Youth: Our community youth programs are designed to engage young minds in science, health, technology, and math; and provide students--from elementary school through high school and college completion--with the opportunities to learn the skills they need to chart a career and succeed in life.

  • Contact Margo McGovern, 617-724-3210

MGH Youth Programs

Research shows that educational attainment is highly correlated with economic status, and is the largest predictor of health status. CCHI is committed to engaging the youth population of Boston, Chelsea and Revere by increasing science literacy, and stimulating an interest in health careers.

Every year for the past two decades MGH has inspired hundreds of Boston youth who are interested in health and science careers with activities and employment opportunities. MGH is committed to expanding the horizons of these young people as a health improvement strategy as well as a workforce development strategy. CCHI provides 600 youth (grades 3 through college and beyond) with academic, life, and career skills that expand and enhance their educational and career options through activities related to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). More than 400 MGHers volunteer to make this happen. 

STEM Clubs (Grades 3-5), Senior STEM Clubs (Grades 6-8) and the Science Fair Mentoring Program (Grades 7-8) build exploration and skill development through experiences and relationships related to STEM subjects and careers, life sciences and health and wellness. STEM Clubs strive to develop excitement and engagement in STEM subjects, build confidence in students' abilities to succeed in these subjects, and exposure students to STEM careers. Fun activities, such as hands-on lab skill development, strengthen students' intellectual abilities and critical thinking skills, sense of belonging and membership, and mastery of their future. Students are further inspired and motivated by guest speakers who are training to become physicians, and are also people of color, allowing many young people to follow their passion to a career in health or science.

STEM Clubs (Grades 3-5) meet at the Boys & Girls Clubs in Roxbury and Charlestown, at the Richard J. Murphy School in Dorchester and the Harvard Kent School in Charlestown. Middle School Senior STEM Club students (Grades 6-8), who meet at the Boys & Girls Club in Roxbury and at the Murphy School, learn how to work as a team, develop research skills, and improve their public speaking and communication skills by working on science curriculum. Additional career exploration opportunities and mentoring are offered through a science fair project and a 6 1/2-week summer internship.

A fully integrated, four-year high school program called MGH Youth Scholars focuses on career exploration, research and college readiness in conjunction with CCHI's existing youth programs. Each summer, the MGH Youth Scholar Alumni cohort engages in continued learning and professional development at MGH. These programs expand the curriculum providing foundational learning for students in Grade 9 through high school graduation and beyond. CCHI's long-term objective in creating these programs is to develop longitudinal STEM and health care career opportunities for youth that will be both inspirational and aspirational toward their future endeavors. Such youth programs lead to long-term benefits that support the Center’s mission of building and sustaining healthier communities in the following ways:

• Anti-poverty strategy: Jobs in science and engineering continue to grow (Bureau of Labor and Statistics). It is essential to develop a diverse workforce with the proper knowledge and skills to compete globally.

• Health improvement strategy: A high correlation exists between economic and health status, with higher economic status resulting in improved health status.

• Mentoring strategy: Students of color “need to be exposed to scientists of any color…STEM role models, teachers with STEM background, visits to STEM labs, science fairs, and after-school programs all help students catch the excitement of science…”  (Science Career Magazine)