Benni Arias of Roxbury confidently entered the MGH Summer Jobs orientation earlier this month ready to begin his fifth year in the program. He returns to MGH Security, his fourth year in that department with supervisors Jennifer Goba and Rebecca Colburn.

MGH SUMMER JOBS—NOW IN ITS 22ND YEAR

153 youth working throughout Mass General Hospital

25/Jul/2012

MGH SUMMER JOBS—NOW IN ITS 22ND YEAR

153 youth working throughout Mass General Hospital

BOSTON- July 25, 2012- Benni Arias of Roxbury confidently entered the MGH Summer Jobs orientation earlier this month ready to begin his fifth year in the program. He returns to MGH Security, his fourth year in that department with supervisors Jennifer Goba and Rebecca Colburn.

Benni has worked on Main Campus and the Charlestown Navy Yard patrolling areas of the campus and assisting his supervisor on security calls, and takes great satisfaction from his work at Mass General. “I like helping people. I’ve learned new skills and passed my First Response training course. Each summer, I have more responsibilities, and I rise to the occasion.” A 2012 graduate of the John O’Bryant School of Math & Science, Benni’s summer job experience inspires him to pursue a degree in criminal justice when he enters Framingham State University this fall.

As the city’s largest health care employer, Mass General provides meaningful employment opportunities to Boston’s youth. As part of Boston Mayor Menino’s Summer Jobs Campaign, MGH is the city’s largest employer of Boston's summer youth. The program, operating since 1991, offers young people positive summertime activities as they are exposed to health-related careers that could be in their future. The Summer Jobs Program, with more than 150 students, is overseen by the MGH Center for Community Health Improvement, and runs to August 17.

About the Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI)

CCHI carries out its work in Chelsea, Revere, and Charlestown, where MGH has maintained healthcare centers for more than 40 years, as well as in Boston among youth, homeless persons and seniors. CCHI has partnered with the communities it serves to assess needs and create more than 35 programs that:

  • Reduce and prevent substance abuse 
  • Tackle the obesity epidemic by increasing access to healthy food and physical activity
  • Increase access to care for vulnerable populations such as immigrants and refugees, seniors, and homeless people
  • Prevent cancers through early detection and screening
  • Generate interest in science and health careers among youth

 

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