Tracey Benner of Boston’s Allston neighborhood begins work this month as the program coordinator for the Youth Programs team at the MGH Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI). In her new position, Benner will manage the day-to-day partnerships and activities for the STEM and Senior STEM programs. She also will manage all aspects of the MGH Summer Jobs program.

MGH CCHI NAMES TRACEY BENNER PROGRAM COORDINATOR TO THE YOUTH PROGRAMS TEAM

01/Nov/2012

BOSTON—November 1, 2012— Tracey Benner of Boston’s Allston neighborhood begins work this month as the program coordinator for the Youth Programs team at the MGH Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI). In her new position, Benner will manage the day-to-day partnerships and activities for the STEM and Senior STEM programs. She also will manage all aspects of the MGH Summer Jobs program.

For the past year, Benner worked as a coordinator for the STEP IT UP (SIU) program with the Partners HeathCare Center for Connected Health. She was the program liaison to Boston Public School staff where she coordinated and implemented a pedometer-based fitness program in six BPS schools. Prior to this position, Benner worked with the District Attorneys’ offices in Norfolk and Suffolk Counties as a domestic violence advocate and multidisciplinary team coordinator at the Children’s Advocacy Center, respectively. Benner received her B.A. in psychology from the University of Massachusetts –Amherst and her Masters in Social Work from Bridgewater State College.

 About the Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI)

CCHI www.massgeneral.org/cchi carries out its work in Chelsea, Revere, and Charlestown, where MGH has maintained healthcare centers for more than 40 years, as well as in Boston among youth, homeless persons and seniors. CCHI has partnered with the communities it serves to assess needs and create more than 35 programs that:

  • Reduce and prevent substance abuse 
  • Tackle the obesity epidemic by increasing access to healthy food and physical activity
  • Increase access to care for vulnerable populations such as immigrants and refugees, seniors, and homeless people
  • Prevent cancers through early detection and screening
  • Generate interest in science and health careers among youth

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