Health information is easy to obtain if you have a computer with an internet connection AND you have someone to help you sift through numerous links and the annoying ads.

ARCH CELEBRATES 12 YEARS OF HELPING RESIDENTS FIND THE ANSWERS TO THEIR HEALTH QUESTIONS

05/Dec/2012

ARCH CELEBRATES 12 YEARS OF HELPING SENIORS AND LOW INCOME RESIDENTS FIND THE ANSWERS TO THEIR HEALTH QUESTIONS

 

CHELSEA—December 5, 2012—Health information is easy to obtain if you have a computer with an internet connection AND you have someone to help you sift through numerous links and the annoying ads.

However, if you lack a computer and the experience to use one, important health information to help you and your family remains elusive.

For Chelsea residents, they are fortunate to have ARCH (www.arch-mgh.org). The program is collaboration among MGH Community Health Associates, the MGH Treadwell Library, and community-based organizations. The MGH ARCH website was established to provide a safe and efficient way for community members to access vetted health information on the internet. ARCH has been designed to simplify internet searches for trustworthy health information and to prevent users from having to wade through thousands of pages of online information. The site features links to highly respected, reliable health information in English and other languages.

Six new computers at the Chelsea Senior Center were unveiled today.

For more than a decade, ARCH has focused on reaching out to vulnerable populations in the communities while also serving the MGH Chelsea HealthCare Center employees' needs for high-quality health information and resources. 

ARCH celebrated its 12th anniversary on Wednesday, December 5 beginning at 10 a.m. with an open house at Chelsea Senior Center. Director Tracy Nowicki celebrated the successful implementation of the most recent ARCH outreach project there. Speaking at the event was Luis Prado, Director of Chelsea Health Dept, Elizabeth Schneider, Director of MGH Treadwell Library, Marianne Ramos, a staff member of Chelsea Senior Center, and two seniors: Edward Rosengard and Herminda P. Castellanos.

Major activities of ARCH outreach projects include computer equipment upgrading and hands-on ARCH training to use the website that includes www.medlineplus.gov, developed by the National Library of Medicine which funded of all the ARCH outreach activities.

Led by MGH Community Health Associates, ARCH is a partnership of MGH Treadwell Library, Greater Boston Center for Healthy Communities, and the City of Chelsea, with support from the National Library of Medicine, New England Region. For more information on ARCH, contact Ming Sun at (781) 485-6477 or msun@partners.org.

About MGH Treadwell Library

The Treadwell Library is the Health Sciences Library of the Massachusetts General Hospital. It manages the knowledge-based information that is needed for patient care, teaching, research, and administration at the MGH.  Library collections and services support diverse user groups - clinicians, research scientists, educators, administrators, students, and patients and their families.

About Community Health Associates

MGH Community Health Associates (CHA), a division under MGH Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI), primarily works with the MGH HealthCare Centers in Charlestown, Chelsea, Everett, and Revere to enhance and improve primary care services for patients in these communities.

About the Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI)

CCHI www.massgeneral.org/cchi carries out its work in Chelsea, Revere, and Charlestown, where MGH has maintained healthcare centers for more than 40 years, as well as in Boston among youth, homeless persons and seniors. CCHI has partnered with the communities it serves to assess needs and create more than 35 programs that:

  • Reduce and prevent substance abuse 
  • Tackle the obesity epidemic by increasing access to healthy food and physical activity
  • Increase access to care for vulnerable populations such as immigrants and refugees, seniors, and homeless people
  • Prevent cancers through early detection and screening
  • Generate interest in science and health careers among youth

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