Making the students feel at ease in a large teaching hospital was the job of more than 75 MGH volunteers who hosted 100 students throughout the campus on Feb. 1 as part of the annual MGH Job Shadow Day, sponsored by the Center for Community Health Improvement.

Students explore health and science career options

08/Feb/2013

 

ON THE JOB: Browne and Abramson, center, talk to students Rodriquez, left, and Giacomo De Filippino during their visit to the MGH.

Anna Rodriguez knew she wanted to be a nurse, but after following Jerry Browne, RN, lymphoma practice nurse in the MGH Cancer Center, the East Boston High School sophomore now knows she wants to be a nurse at the MGH. “I can see myself doing this. As a nurse you need to make the patient feel better. Making patients feel at ease is the best thing you can do in life. They rely on you,” she says.

Making the students feel at ease in a large teaching hospital was the job of more than 75 MGH volunteers who hosted 100 students throughout the campus on Feb. 1 as part of the annual MGH Job Shadow Day, sponsored by the Center for Community Health Improvement. During their visit, Browne introduced his students to Jeremy Abramson, MD, clinical director of the Center for Lymphoma, who not only described the work of the MGH Cancer Center but also offered each student his business card to contact him if they wanted to learn more in the future.

A first-time Job Shadow host, Browne remembers well his own job shadowing experience as a high school student. “I visited Emerson Hospital in Concord and shadowed a physical therapist for the day. I still have a photo of myself that appeared in the local paper in 1984. My mentor took the time to share his knowledge and pique my interest in the health field, and I am glad to do the same,” he says.

During the event, Javier Irazoqui, PhD, hosted five students in his developmental immunology laboratory on Jackson 14. Boston Arts Academy junior Emilio Rome was fascinated by the research due to his strong interest in learning about bacteria and how they work. “Because they’re so small, when they get inside your body, they can do so much damage,” he says.

Irazoqui was pleased with the students’ reactions. “It reminds me in a very concrete way of the wonder and awe that
I felt when I first learned some biology, and that still motivates me today.”

For more information on MGH Youth Programs, contact Margo McGovern at mjmmcgovern@partners.org or
(617) 724-3210.     


Read more articles from the 02/08/13 Hotline issue.