What Can I Expect After My Child's Blood Test?

The results of your child’s blood test can help doctors decide the best next steps for your child. You should get the results back in about 1-2 weeks. Your child’s doctor will go over the results with you.

The boxes below will help you learn what to expect, depending on the blood test results.

 If your child's blood test is positive for celiac disease markers...
  • A positive result doesn't always mean your child has celiac disease. It means your child has markers in his/her blood that means he/she might have celiac disease.
  • Your child must be seen by a gastroenterologist (doctor who cares for people with stomach or intestine problems).
  • Your child should continue to eat foods with gluten. If your child stops eating gluten, we can’t tell if he/she has celiac disease in future tests.
  • Your child will need an endoscopy and more blood tests to figure out if he/she truly has celiac disease. An endoscopy is a test that checks the throat, stomach and upper intestines for problems.
 If your child's blood test is negative for celiac disease markers...
  •  There is still a possibility that your child has celiac disease
  • Your child should see a gastroenterologist if he/she has abdominal (stomach) pain, diarrhea, constipation, poor growth, weight loss, headaches, fatigue, or other concerning symptoms. This is true even if your child's blood test comes back negative for celiac disease markers.
  • Your child should continue to eat foods with gluten. If your child stops eating gluten, we can't tell if he/she has celiac disease in future tests.
  • Your child might need more blood tests to figure out if he/she has celiac disease.


Did you know?

Your child should not start a gluten-free diet until he/she is diagnosed with celiac disease. We know eating gluten is not pleasant for your child right now, but gluten in the body helps us figure out if your child has celiac disease. Talk with the doctor if your child’s symptoms are distressing or uncomfortable while eating gluten during this time of testing.

 

Rev: 9/2016

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