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Deborah M. Mitchell, MD

  • Associate Program Director, Pediatric Endocrine, MGHfC


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Deborah Mitchell, MD, is a clinician in the MGHfC Pediatric Endocrine Unit and a clinical investigator in the Endocrine Division of Mass General. She is the Associate Director of the pediatric endocrine training program at MGHfC.



Centers & Specialties

MassGeneral Hospital for Children

Clinical Interests
  • Pediatric endocrinology
  • Bone and mineral metabolism
Medical Education
  • MD, Harvard Medical School
  • Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Fellowship, Massachusetts General Hospital
Board Certifications
  • Pediatrics
  • Pediatric Endocrinology
  • Boston: Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Salem: North Shore Medical Center
Patient Gateway
Yes, learn more
Insurances Accepted
  • Aetna Health Inc.
  • Beech Street
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - Blue Care 65
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - Indemnity
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - Managed Care
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - Partners Plus
  • Centene/Celticare
  • Cigna (PAL #'s)
  • Fallon Community HealthCare
  • Great-West Healthcare (formally One Health Plan)
  • Harvard Pilgrim Health Plan - ACD
  • Harvard Pilgrim Health Plan - PBO
  • Health Care Value Management (HCVM)
  • Humana/Choice Care PPO
  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • Medicare - ACD
  • Neighborhood Health Plan - ACD
  • Neighborhood Health Plan - PBO
  • OSW - Maine
  • OSW - New Hampshire
  • OSW - Rhode Island
  • Private Health Care Systems (PHCS)
  • Senior Whole Health
  • TriCare
  • Tufts Health Plan
  • Unicare
  • United Healthcare (non-HMO) - ACD
  • United Healthcare (non-HMO) - PBO
Patient Age Group

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Deborah Mitchell, MD, is a pediatric endocrinologist with particular interests in calcium and bone metabolism. She completed pediatric residency at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children (MGHfC) in 2009, and a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology at MGHfC in 2012. She is the Associate Director of the pediatric endocrine training program at MGHfC.

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Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Mitchell's research is concerned with factors which promote optimal bone growth and mineralization during childhood and adolescence, with a goal of preventing osteoporosis and fractures in adults. She is currently investigating bone accrual and microarchitecture in children with type 1 diabetes, a condition known to increase the risk of bone fragility. Her goal is to better understand why patients with diabetes are at increased risk of fracture in order to be able to design and test therapies to strengthen bones in this population.


View my most recent publications at PubMed


McCormack S., Mitchell D.M., Woo M., Levitsky L.L, Ross D.S., and Misra M. 2009 Radioactive iodine for hyperthyroidism in children and adolescents: referral rate and response to treatment. Clin Endocrinol. 71, 884-91.

Mitchell, D.M. and Juppner, H. 2010. Regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism in the fetus and neonate. Curr. Opin. Endocrinol. Diabetes Obes 17, 25-30.

Mitchell D.M., Regan S., Cooley M.R., Lauter K.B., Vrla M.C., Becker C.B., Burnett-Bowie S.M., and Mannstadt M. 2012. Long-term follow-up of patients with hypoparathyroidism. Jnl Clin Endocrinol Metab 97, 4507-14.

Mitchell D.M.,Henao M.P., Finkelstein J.S., and Burnett-Bowie S.M. 2012. Prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency in healthy adults. Endocrine Practice 18, 914-23.

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News & Events

  • Understanding healthy bone growth in childhood to improve long-term quality of life

    Childhood is a critical time for bone health. Approximately 90% of peak bone mass is acquired by age 18, with about 50% of this acquired during the pubertal growth spurt. As a pediatrician, my research goal is to better understand the factors which impact bone growth and mineralization during this important window in order to maximize long-term bone health.


Pediatric Endocrine Associates
55 Fruit Street
Boston MA, 02114-2696
Phone: 617-726-2909

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