Research Council Newsletter Volume 2, Issue 1

Announcements from the MassGeneral Hospital for Children Research Council, including the Mass General Center for the Treatment and Study of Food Allergy and Food-Related Disorders, the Lurie Center for Autism, and research of Lynda Stuart, MD, PhD; Jeanne Van Cleave, MD; and Jason Harris, MD.

Announcement

Twenty-four posters were submitted for presentation at the MGHfC Research Day which was held on March 30, 2010. Three posters were judged meritorious and given a special award – funds to attend a national meeting of choice. Winners were:

1. Leah Jacoby - Total and site-specific fat and lean mass as predictors of bone density in female adolescent athletes – working with Dr. Madhu Misra in Pediatric Endocrinology at MGHfC
2. Patricia Rodriguez Bachiller - TGF-ß decreases expression of NO signaling enzymes in the injured newborn lung and in vascular smooth muscle cells -working with Jesse Roberts in the Pediatric ICU at MGHfC
3. Helena Paidassi - Description of novel innate activation of macrophage: Role in host immunity and intestinal immunopathology - work with Adam Lacy-Hulbert in Development Immunology at MGHfC

Dr. Madhusmita Misra has accepted the Editorship of the MGHfC Research Newsletter. Please contact Dr. Misra (mmisra@partners.org) regarding research awards or grants funded.

The Mass General Center for the Treatment and Study of Food Allergy and Food-Related Disorders

Wayne Shreffler, MD, PhD

   Wayne Shreffler, MD, PhD

Aubrey J. Katz, MD

   Aubrey J. Katz, MD

In Fall 2009, Massachusetts General Hospital established a comprehensive Center for the Treatment and Study of Food Allergy and Food-Related Disorders (the “Food Allergy Center”) to provide state-of-the-art care while investigating the mysteries that underlie these inadequately understood and as yet incurable diseases. By dovetailing a multi-specialty collaborative approach to care with research and training, the center’s physicians expertly diagnose and treat children and adults suffering from IgE-mediated food allergies as well as food-induced gastrointestinal immune disorders. read more.

The Research Program Dr. Margaret Bauman

Margaret Bauman, MD

   Margaret Bauman, MD

A part of the Lurie Family Autism Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and the MassGeneral Hospital for Children, LADDERS (“Learning and Developmental Disabilities Evaluation & Rehabilitation Services”) is a multidisciplinary program designed to evaluate and treat children, adolescents and adults with a wide variety of handicapping conditions. The Lurie Family Autism Center/LADDERS provides expertise in neurology, developmental pediatrics medicine, gastroenterology, psychiatry, psycho-pharmacology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and speech language pathology. LADDERS is born out of a philosophy that developmentally handicapped persons deserve to be viewed as individuals, each with personal patterns of talents and challenges. We strongly believe each individual deserves the opportunity for careful evaluation as well as access to the quantity and quality of services needed to reach his or her full potential, regardless of economic, social or ethnic background. read more

Programs of the Junior Faculty

Lynda Stuart, MD, PhD

   Lynda Stuart, MD, PhD

“Innate Immunity – Learning on the Fly”
We use both mammalian systems and model organisms, and focus on developing new systems-based approaches to understand phagocytosis and innate immunity. Our ultimate aim is to generate and test novel hypotheses concerning the host-pathogen interaction and the role of phagocytosis in development and host defense. read more.

Jeanne Van Cleave, MD

   Jeanne Van Cleave, MD

“Primary Care Management of Chronic Conditions in Pediatrics”
Prevalence of chronic conditions in children are increasing,1 yet the organization of primary care is less oriented toward management of chronic conditions.2 Categorizing visits as preventive, urgent, and chronic care may limit opportunities for management of chronic conditions. Understanding how chronic conditions are managed in this context can guide improvements in primary care.  read more.

Jason Harris, MD

   Jason Harris, MD

“Immunity to Cholera”
Vibrio cholerae causes an estimated 5 million cases of diarrhea and over 100,000 deaths annually, predominantly in children. Although natural infection with cholera results in long-term protection against subsequent infection, the mechanisms by which this immunity is generated remain poorly understood. This is a critical problem since cholera vaccines have proven relatively ineffective, especially in children. Because of this, the development of improved cholera vaccines is considered a priority by the World Health Organization. read more.

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