Treatments

Currently Browsing:Dermatology

Currently Browsing:Imaging

  • Musculoskeletal Imaging

    In the Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital, musculoskeletal radiologists are recognized internationally for clinical expertise in the diagnosis of bone, joint and spine disorders including sports injury, trauma, arthritis, cancer and other conditions. We specialize in interventions that use image guidance for pain management, spine and joint injections, biopsies and minimally invasive cancer treatments. Our radiologists are also known for teaching and research in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Request an Appointment

    Call to schedule an appointment 617-724-9729

Currently Browsing:Orthopaedics

  • Orthopaedic Subspecialties

    Pediatric and Adult Patients

    The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Mass General provides high-quality, personalized care for every orthopaedic condition.

Currently Browsing:Pediatrics

  • Pediatric Orthopaedics

    The MassGeneral Hospital for Children Orthopaedics Service provides clinical care to infants, children and adolescents, from birth to college age, for the entire spectrum of musculoskeletal problems.

    Contact the MGHfC Pediatric Orthopaedics Service at: 617-726-8523

About This Condition

Calluses and Corns

What are calluses and corns?

Calluses develop as a normal response to chronic excessive friction and pressure. They are protective pads made up of a thickened upper layer of skin. Corns are small calluses that develop on the top of the toes due to pressure or rubbing against shoes or other toes. Both can be the result of poorly fitting shoes, abnormal foot function, or high activity levels. 

Treatment for calluses and corns

Calluses are usually painless, but corns can be quite painful. Sometimes, corns are confused with warts. Calluses can be avoided by removing the source of the rubbing and thinning the callus with a pumice stone or small blade. Treatment for corns should provide symptom relief as well as lessen the underlying cause. Treatment choices may include:

  • Applying pads around the corn area

  • Wearing larger, more comfortable shoes

  • Surgery is only considered if other measures fail 

Calluses and corns are rarely a serious condition. However, people with diabetes are prone to infections and ulcers. They should examine their feet on a regular basis. If any sores are noticed, they should see their healthcare provider right away.