Procedures

Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic

The Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic, part of the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center, provides specialized care for individuals with inherited heart rhythm conditions.

The Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center provides specialized care for individuals with suspected or diagnosed genetic conditions that may increase the risk of a heart rhythm disturbance, known as an arrhythmia.

Comprehensive Care

Multidisciplinary Care and the Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic

The Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic works closely with Corrigan Minehan Heart Center doctors in the following treatment programs:

Many altered electrical or structural changes in the heart are caused by genetic factors. Our multidisciplinary team provides care that includes a comprehensive cardiovascular evaluation and counseling to diagnose conditions that increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Our team includes cardiologists and nurses who specialize in cardiac arrhythmias and who have expertise in the use and interpretation of genetic information. We utilize a number of diagnostic, risk stratification and therapeutic tools to help direct treatment, and we work closely with colleagues specializing in cardiovascular imaging and other cardiovascular specialists. We specialize in treating conditions such as:

Our experts in the Corrigan Minehan Heart Center are skilled both in invasive and noninvasive therapies that may be necessary for patients with inherited arrhythmia conditions. These treatments include genetic testing, pharmacologic management, implantation of cardiac pacemakers or defibrillators, catheter ablation, cardiac surgery or other options.

Experienced Physicians and Genetics Expertise

The Arrhythmia Genetics Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center is led by Steven Lubitz, MD, MPH; Patrick Ellinor, MD, PhD and David Milan, MD. The clinic is structured to provide patients with comprehensive, expert care, and through ongoing research, is focused on establishing new best practices for the treatment of genetic arrhythmias.

Our comprehensive care includes:

  • Genetic testing
  • Counseling
  • Risk stratification and diagnostics
  • Invasive electrophysiology diagnostic testing
  • Medical treatments
  • Pacemakers and defibrillators

What to Expect

Your evaluation will typically include a detailed medical history, family history and physical examination, as well as education and counseling.

At the conclusion of your visit, we may recommend other tests to help diagnose or evaluate your potential condition.

What to Bring

We request that you provide a list of your immediate and extended family members, along with their ages and their medical histories (patients may use a tool such as My Family Health Portrait). If you have had a prior evaluation, please bring with you any relevant data that you have.
Genetic Testing and Family Screening

We frequently recommend clinical genetic testing to facilitate diagnosis, help direct care or to enable efficient screening of family members at risk. Typically, genetic testing involves collection of a blood sample.

Since genetic conditions are usually inherited, our providers consider the familial implications of being diagnosed with a genetic arrhythmia syndrome. Our clinicians can conduct an evaluation of family members to provide counseling and determine if they are at risk for the particular arrhythmia syndrome
Innovative Research

We are committed to understanding the causes and management of genetic cardiac arrhythmias. Our clinicians conduct leading-edge research to determine the mechanisms of these conditions and identify ways to treat these arrhythmias. During your visit with us, please ask about our ongoing research protocols to learn more.

Conditions treated:
Brugada syndrome
Long QT syndrome
Short QT syndrome
Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy / arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia
Early onset atrial fibrillation
Early repolarization syndrome
Unexplained sudden cardiac arrest
Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation

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