Treatment Programs

photo

Adult Medicine Imaging

The Adult Medicine Imaging Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging offers a wide range of diagnostic exams and minimally invasive, image-guided treatments, all provided using leading-edge equipment and interpreted by specialty-trained radiologists.

From accidents to annual screenings to closer looks at areas of concern, the Adult Medicine Imaging Program provides:

  • A full menu of exams including CT, MRI, bone densitometry, mammography, cardiac stress testing, and ultrasound.
  • Leading-edge technology, including the latest digital-mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and CT scanners.
  • Minimally invasive, image-guided therapeutic procedures, including treatments for varicose veins, back pain, and uterine fibroids.
  • Tight coordination with experts across Mass General.

Specialist radiologists, dedicated to your care

Every scan is read by a specialty-trained radiologist, an expert who has extensive training and real-world experience in both the imaging technology being used and the area of body in focus. Our doctors are part of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Radiology.Coordinated care

We work in close consultation with your doctor to schedule and plan your exam. Then we provide swift results, including a written report and image access (if your doctor desires), within 48 to 72 hours. The information discovered through imaging helps your doctor plan the next steps in your care.Emphasis on safety

Our commitment to safety extends through everything we do, from exam-room procedures to leading-edge research. We pay special attention to minimizing radiation exposure—without giving up image quality. We employ physicists and engineers to calibrate and maintain our equipment at the highest level, and we invest to replace outmoded equipment and bring the latest technology to our patients.

The Adult Medicine Imaging program at Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging offers diagnostic exams and/or image-guided treatments for the following conditions.

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a disorder of the pituitary gland which produces excess growth hormones and thus results in excessive growth, first in the hands and feet, as soft tissue begins to swell.

Actinic Keratosis

Actinic keratosis, also known as a solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty bump that arises on the skin surface.

Acute Bronchitis

Bronchitis is an inflammation of the breathing tubes (airways) that are called bronchi, which causes increased production of mucus and other changes.

Adrenal Tumors / Pheochromocytoma

Tumors of the adrenal glands can cause many problems by excess secretion of certain adrenal-produced hormones, most often resulting in high blood pressure, which can be extreme.

Alcohol-Induced Liver Disease

Alcohol-induced liver disease, as the name implies, is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol and is a common, but preventable, disease.

Alcoholic Hepatitis

Hepatitis is the inflammation of the liver, resulting in liver cell damage and destruction. Alcoholic hepatitis is a complex problem and is a precursor to chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Allergic Rhinitis (Allergies)

Rhinitis is a reaction that occurs in the nose when airborne irritants (allergens) trigger the release of histamine. Histamine causes inflammation and fluid production in the fragile linings of nasal passages, sinuses, and eyelids.

Amenorrhea

Amenorrhea is a menstrual condition characterized by absent menstrual periods for more than three monthly menstrual cycles.

Analgesic Nephropathy

Analgesic nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease that gradually leads to end-stage renal disease and the need for permanent dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Appendicitis

Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a finger-like portion of the large intestine that generally hangs down from the lower right side of the abdomen.

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory disease in which the airways become sensitive to allergens (any substance that triggers an allergic reaction).

Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)

Atopic dermatitis, also called eczema, is a hereditary and chronic skin disorder that causes a person’s skin to itch, turn red and flake. It mostly affects infants or very young children.

Autoimmune Hepatitis

Hepatitis is the inflammation of the liver, resulting in liver cell damage and destruction. In autoimmune hepatitis, the body's own immune system destroys liver cells.

Barrett's Esophagus

Barrett's esophagus is a condition in which normal cells that line the esophagus turn into cells not usually found in humans called “specialized columnar cells.”

Benign Prostate Problems

Benign prostate problems are clinical conditions of the prostate gland that are not cancer, such as prostatism (any prostate condition that interferes with urine flow), prostatitis (an inflamed prostate gland), prostatalgia (pain in the prostate gland) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate).

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

BPH (also referred to as benign prostatic hypertrophy) is a condition in which the prostate gland becomes very enlarged and may cause problems associated with urination.

Biliary Cirrhosis / Bile Duct Cancer

Biliary cirrhosis is a rare form of liver cirrhosis, caused by disease or defects of the bile ducts.

Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer occurs when there are abnormal, cancerous cells growing in the bladder.

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine because of a sensitivity to gluten, which is found in wheat, rye, barley, and oats. This hereditary disorder interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food.

Cervicitis

A painful irritation of the cervix, cervicitis often lasts several months or longer, sometimes occurring after childbirth or use of oral contraceptives.

Cholecystitis

Cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder wall and nearby abdominal lining. Cholecystitis is usually caused by a gallstone in the cystic duct, the duct that connects the gallbladder to the hepatic duct.

Chronic Bronchitis

Chronic bronchitis is a long-term inflammation of the bronchi, which results in increased production of mucus, as well as other changes.

Chronic Liver Disease / Cirrhosis

Chronic liver disease is marked by the gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. Several liver diseases fall under this category, including cirrhosis of the liver and fibrosis of the liver.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

COPD is a term that refers to a group of lung diseases that can interfere with normal breathing.

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is malignant cells found in the colon or rectum.

Congenital Liver Defects

Congenital liver defects are rare liver diseases present at birth such as biliary atresia, when the bile ducts are absent or have developed abnormally, and choledochal cyst, a malformation of the hepatic duct that can obstruct flow of bile in infants.

Craniosynostosis (Craniofacial Anomaly)

Craniosynostosis is a condition in which sutures close too early, causing problems with normal brain and skull growth.

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that is a chronic condition that may recur at various times over a lifetime.

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system. CF causes the body to produce thick, sticky mucus that leads to progressive lung infection and difficulty gaining weight.

Cystocele (Fallen Bladder)

Cystocele is the name for a hernia-like disorder in women that occurs when the wall between the bladder and the vagina weakens, causing the bladder to drop or sag into the vagina.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Thrombophlebitis

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot develops in a vein deep in the body.

Deviated Septum

A deviated septum is an abnormal configuration of the cartilage that divides the two sides of the nasal cavity, which may cause problems with proper breathing or nasal discharge.

Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes may also be known by a variety of other names, including the following: insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), juvenile diabetes, brittle diabetes, or sugar diabetes.

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition that results from insufficient production of the antidiuretic hormone (ADH), a hormone that helps the kidneys and body conserve the correct amount of water.

Diabetic Foot Problems

The nerves of the feet are often affected by neuropathy or blood vessel diseases. When a diabetes patient loses sensation in the feet, sores or injuries may go unnoticed until ulcers develop.

Diabetic Nephropathy (Kidney Disease)

Nephropathy is the deterioration of the kidneys. The final stage of nephropathy is called end-stage renal disease, or ESRD.

Diverticular Disease

In the colon, some people have small pouches that bulge outward through weak spots. Diverticular disease is an inflammation or infection in the pouches, known as diverticula, which are located in the colon.

Drug-Induced Hepatitis

Hepatitis is the inflammation of the liver, resulting in liver cell damage and destruction. Drug-induced hepatitis is rare and is caused by toxic exposure to certain medications, vitamins, herbal remedies, or food supplements.

Empty Sella Syndrome

Empty sella syndrome is a condition where the bony structure that houses the pituitary gland is enlarged, sometimes resulting in high fluid pressure inside the skull.

Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation caused by a viral infection.

End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)

Renal failure refers to temporary or permanent damage to the kidneys that results in loss of normal kidney function.

Gallstones

Gallstones form when bile stored in the gallbladder hardens into stone-like material.

Gas in the Digestive Tract

Gas in the digestive tract is created from swallowing air or by the breakdown of certain foods by the bacteria that are present in the colon.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder that is caused by gastric acid flowing from the stomach into the esophagus.

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis is a stomach disorder in which the stomach takes too long in emptying its contents.

Giardiasis

Giardiasis is an infectious diarrheal disease caused by the parasite Giardia lamblia, which can be transmitted through oral-fecal contact and by water contaminated by feces.

Glomerulonephritis

Glomerulonephritis is a type of glomerular kidney disease in which the kidneys' filters become inflamed and scarred, and slowly lose their ability to remove wastes and excess fluid from the blood to make urine.

Glomerulosclerosis

Glomerulosclerosis is the term used to describe scarring that occurs within the kidneys in the small balls of tiny blood vessels called the glomeruli.

Goodpasture Syndrome

Goodpasture syndrome is a rare, autoimmune disease that can affect the lungs and kidneys.

Helicobacter Pylori

H. pylori is a spiral-shaped bacterium found in the stomach, which (along with acid secretion) damages stomach and duodenal tissue, causing inflammation and peptic ulcers.

Hematuria (Blood in the Urine)

Hematuria is the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) in the urine.

Hemochromatosis

Hemochromatosis, also called iron overload disease, is one of the most common genetic disorder in the US.

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare condition that mostly affects children under the age of 10. It is often characterized by damage to the lining of blood vessel walls, destruction of red blood cells, and kidney failure.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding, or coagulation, disorder. Children with hemophilia lack the ability to stop bleeding because of the low levels, or complete absence, of specific proteins, called "factors," in their blood that are necessary for clotting.

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are blood vessels, normally present in and around the anus and lower rectum, that have become swollen due to stretching under pressure.

Hiatal Hernia

A hiatal hernia occurs when the upper part of the stomach pushes up into the chest through a small opening in the diaphragm, the muscle that separates the stomach from the chest.

Hip Fracture

A hip fracture is a break in the femur (thigh bone) of the hip joint.

Hyperparathyroidism

Hyperparathyroidism is caused by overactive parathyroid glands. Overactive parathyroid glands produce too much parathyroid hormones, which in turn stimulate increased levels of calcium in the blood stream.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism means overactivity of the thyroid gland, resulting in too much thyroid hormone in the bloodstream.

Hypopituitarism

Hypopituitarism, also called an underactive pituitary gland, is a condition that affects the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland - usually resulting in a partial or complete loss of functioning of that lobe.

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Nephropathy

IgA nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease that may progress over a period of 10 to 20 years, and can lead to end-stage renal disease.

Infertility

Infertility is defined by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) as a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body's ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.

Inguinal Hernia

A hernia occurs when a section of intestine protrudes through a weakness in the abdominal muscles. A hernia that occurs in the groin area is called an inguinal hernia.

Interstitial Lung Disease (Pulmonary Fibrosis)

Interstitial lung diseases are named after the tissue between the air sacs of the lungs called the interstitium - the tissue affected by fibrosis (scarring).

Kidney Stones

A kidney stone is a solid piece of material that forms from crystallization of excreted substances in the urine.

Liver Tumors

Tumors are abnormal masses of tissue that form when cells begin to reproduce at an increased rate. The liver can grow both non-cancerous (benign) and cancerous (malignant) tumors.

Lyme Disease

While most tick bites are harmless, several species can cause life-threatening diseases. Two of these well-known diseases are Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Lyme disease.

Measles

Measles is a viral illness characterized by a distinct rash and a fever.

Melanoma

Melanoma is a disease of the skin in which cancer cells are found in the melanocytes, the cells that produce color in the skin or pigment known as melanin.

Meningitis

Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that surround the brain.

Nephrotic Syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition often characterized by the following: very high levels of protein in the urine, low levels of protein in the blood, swelling, especially around the eyes, feet, and hands, as well as high cholesterol.

Neurogenic Bladder

The following problems are often associated with a neurogenic bladder: urine leakage, urine retention, damage to the tiny blood vessels in the kidney, and infection of the bladder or ureters.

Occupational Asthma

Occupational asthma is a type of asthma caused by exposure to inhaled irritants in the workplace. Symptoms may disappear when the irritants that caused the asthma are avoided.

Occupational Lung Diseases

Repeated and long-term exposure to certain irritants on the job can lead to an array of lung diseases that may have lasting effects, even after exposure ceases.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), also known as brittle-bone disease, is a genetic (inherited) disorder characterized by bones that break easily without a specific cause.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease in which there is a loss of bone mass and destruction of bone tissue, causing weakening of the bones in the hips, spine and wrists.

Other Liver Disorders

An autoimmune disorder is any reaction or attack of a person's immune system against its own organs and tissues.

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is the inflammation of the pancreas. The inflammation may be sudden (acute) or ongoing (chronic).

Parathyroid Tumor

A parathyroid tumor is a growth inside a parathyroid gland. Parathyroid tumors may cause increased levels of parathyroid hormones secreted by the parathyroid glands, leading to hyperparathyroidism.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Caused by a certain type of bacteria, pelvic inflammatory disease results in pelvic pain and the possibility of an ectopic pregnancy (a fertilized egg becoming implanted outside the uterus).

Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by bacteria, viruses, or chemical irritants.

Polycystic Kidney Disease

Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of numerous cysts filled with fluid in the kidneys.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovarian syndrome involves two of the following: lack of ovulation for an extended period of time, high levels of male hormones or small ovarian cysts.

Postpartum Thyroiditis

One particular postpartum complication is postpartum thyroiditis, a condition characterized by an inflamed thyroid gland.

Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Primary hyperparathyroidism is a metabolic disorder in which one (or more) of the parathyroid glands produces too much parathyroid hormone, which can result in the loss of bone tissue.

Primary Pulmonary Hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is a lung disorder in which the blood pressure in the pulmonary artery rises far above normal levels.

Prostate Disease

There are clinical conditions of the prostate gland that are not cancer, including the following: prostatism, prostatitis, prostatalgia, benign prostatic hyperplasia (Also called BPH or benign prostatic hypertrophy.), impotence (Also called erectile dysfunction) and urinary incontinence).

Prostatitis

Prostatitis is one of several benign (non-cancerous), inflamed conditions of the prostate gland.

Pseudocysts of the Pancreas

Pseudocysts of the pancreas are abnormal collections of fluid, dead tissue, pancreatic enzymes, and blood that can lead to a painful mass in the pancreas.

Pulmonary Embolism

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blood clot that develops in a blood vessel elsewhere in the body (most commonly from the leg), travels to an artery in the lung, and forms an occlusion (blockage) of the artery.

Pulmonary Emphysema

Emphysema is a chronic lung condition in which alveoli, or air sacs, may be destroyed, narrowed, collapsed, stretched or over-inflated.

Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a rare disease that results from inflammation.

Renal Vascular Disease

Renal vascular disease is the name given to a variety of complications that affect the arteries and veins of the kidneys.

Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder characterized by defective hemoglobin (a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the tissues of the body).

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is an infection of the sinuses near the nose. These infections usually occur after a cold or after an allergic inflammation.

Stomach and Duodenal Ulcers (Peptic Ulcers)

An ulcer is an open sore, or lesion, usually found on the skin or mucous membrane areas of the body.

Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD)

Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are disorders of the jaw muscles, temporomandibular joints, and/or the nerves associated with chronic facial pain.

Thalassemias

Thalassemia is an inherited disorder that affects the production of normal hemoglobin (a type of protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the tissues in the body).

Thyroid Disorders in Women

The thyroid gland, which plays an important role in the body's metabolism, secretes several hormones: thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and calcitonin.

Thyroid Tumors

Thyroid tumors are either benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous) growths.

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS)

Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) describes a cluster of symptoms that involve many systems of the body.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic bacterial infection that usually infects the lungs, although other organs are sometimes involved.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease in which the inner lining of the large intestine (colon or bowel) and rectum become inflamed.

Underactive Adrenal Glands / Addisons Disease

Addison's disease is the result of an underactive adrenal gland.

Urinary Incontinence

Urinary Tract Infection

Urinary tract infections describe a health problem that results from a bacterial infection along the urinary tract.

Vaginitis

Vaginitis refers to any inflammation or infection of the vagina.

Vesicoureteral Reflux

Vesicoureteral reflux occurs when urine dwelling in the bladder flows back into the ureters and often back into the kidneys.

CT colonography removing barriers to colon testing

Editorial by Mass General Imaging radiologist Michael Zalis, MD.

Mass General research: Image reconstruction slashes chest CT radiation

An image processing technique called ASIR allows radiologists to reduce radiation levels in chest CT exams without sacrificing image quality or diagnostic confidence, according to a paper just published by Mass General researchers.

Mass General Imaging introduces CT lung-cancer screening

Research shows a clear benefit for CT lung-cancer screening among individuals who meet strict criteria. Patients and referrers should understand both the benefit and the potential for false positive results.

Thrall: Healthcare IT can help rads tackle radiation exposure

It's imperative that radiologists proactively find ways to keep radiation dose to a minimum, and healthcare IT can help, according to Dr. James H. Thrall, who spoke on the topic this week at the New York Medical Imaging Informatics Symposium.

Images of Imaging: CT (computed tomography)

Get an inside look at CT exams at Mass General Imaging. Learn about CT technology, the professionals who guide patients through the exam process, and the specialty-trained radiologists who interpret every scan.

Images of Imaging: MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

Learn about MRI exams at Mass General Imaging. See what MRI scanners and images look like, understand MRI safety, and learn about the specialty-trained radiologists who interpret every scan.

Webster Center takes on radiation-dose reduction

Dr. James H. Thrall, Department of Radiology chairman emeritus, discusses The Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, a unique research effort dedicated to reducing radiation dose for every exam Mass General Imaging performs.

Decision tools support radiation-reduction efforts

One effective way to reduce radiation exposure is to avoid unnecessary exams. That's why Mass General Imaging has been a leader in developing software tools that guide referring physicians by not only making sure the selected exam matches the patient's needs but also suggesting radiation-free alternatives when appropriate.

Imaging specialists, focused on you

Each radiologist at Mass General Imaging is a specialist in a particular area of the body. Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how patients benefit from the additional specialty training our physicians have completed.

Imaging technology enables non-surgical treatments

Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how the ability to see deep inside the body has driven the development of minimally invasive methods of treatment—a trend in which Mass General Imaging has played a key role.

patient

Explore our convenient locations

Mass General Imaging's locations across Massachusetts offer easy access, and every exam is read by a specialty-trained Mass General radiologist.

patient

Discover the Imaging patient experience

Mass General offers specialty-trained radiologists, leading-edge technology and a caring staff that's committed to patient safety and comfort.

patient

Radiation safety

Learn how Mass General Imaging works to increase patient safety by reducing radiation exposure.