Treatment Programs

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Neuroendovascular Program

Working as part of the Vascular Center, the interventional specialists of the Neuroendovascular Program perform minimally invasive, image-guided treatments for conditions including stroke and cerebral aneurysm. These same interventionalists also use minimally invasive techniques to treat non-vascular conditions including herniated disc and vertebral fractures. In addition, our specialty-trained radiologists use the latest imaging technologies to provide diagnostic exams for a full range of neurological conditions.

Dedicated to diagnosing and treating injuries and diseases of the head, neck, and brain, the Neuroendovascular Program provides:

  • A full suite of exams including MRI, CT, CT Angiography and ultrasound.
  • Leading-edge technology, including the latest ultrasound, MRI, and CT scanners.
  • Minimally invasive, image-guided therapeutic procedures, including treatments for the bulging, rupture, or narrowing of the blood vessels leading to the brain, which can cause stroke.
  • Tight coordination with experts across Mass General.

Specialist radiologists, dedicated to your care

Every scan is read by a specialty-trained radiologist: an expert who has extensive training and real-world experience in both the imaging technology being used and the area of body in focus.

Patients have access to the expertise of a dedicated team of neuroradiologists from the Neurological Imaging division of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Radiology. This group includes internationally recognized experts on diseases and injuries of the brain, head, neck and spine. The group is recognized for cutting-edge research into advanced neuroimaging techniques for diseases including stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and brain tumors.

Mass General Imaging also boasts one of the finest neurointerventional radiology services in the country. These members of the Neuroendovascular Program hold leadership positions in national societies and help lead cutting-edge clinical research. The multidisciplinary team includes doctors for all of the neurovascular specialties—a unique advantage.

Coordinated care

We work in close consultation with your doctor to schedule and plan your exam. Then we provide swift results, including a written report and image access (if your doctor desires), within 48 to 72 hours. The information discovered through imaging helps your doctor plan the next steps in your care.

Emphasis on safety

At Mass General Imaging, our commitment to safety extends through everything we do, from exam-room procedures to leading-edge research. We pay special attention to minimizing radiation exposure—without giving up image quality. We employ physicists and engineers to calibrate and maintain our equipment at the highest level, and we invest to replace outmoded equipment and bring the latest technology to our patients.

The Neuroendovascular Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging offers diagnostic exams and/or image-guided exams for the following conditions.

Acute Spinal Cord Injury

Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic injury that either results in a bruise (also called a contusion), a partial tear, or a complete tear (called a transection) in the spinal cord.

Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease that occurs when nerve cells in the brain die, often resulting in symptoms such as impaired memory, thinking and behavior.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a terminal neurological disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of nerve cells in the spinal cord and brain.

Aneurysm

An aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the normal diameter

Aphasia

Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage in a specific area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension, and leaves a person unable to communicate effectively with others.

Ataxia

Ataxia causes a failure of muscle control in the arms and legs which may result in a lack of balance, coordination and possibly a disturbance in gait.

Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T)

Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare childhood disease that affects the nervous system and some other body systems.

Bell's Palsy

Bell's palsy is an unexplained episode of facial muscle weakness or paralysis that begins suddenly and worsens over three to five days. This condition results from damage to the 7th (facial) cranial nerve, and pain and discomfort usually occurs on one side of the face or head.

Brain Tumors

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain. The tumor can either originate in the brain itself, or come from another part of the body and travel to the brain (metastasize). Brain tumors may be classified as either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), depending on their behavior.

Cerebral Aneurysm

A cerebral aneurysm (also called an intracranial aneurysm or brain aneurysm) is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of an artery in the brain, resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning. Because there is a weakened spot in the artery wall, there is a risk for rupture (bursting) of the aneurysm.

Epilepsy and Seizures

Epilepsy is a neurological condition involving the brain that makes people more susceptible to having seizures.

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis is a stomach disorder in which the stomach takes too long in emptying its contents.

Guillain-Barré Syndrome

Guillain-Barré syndrome is a neurological disorder in which the body's immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system.

Head Injury

A head injury is a broad term that describes a vast array of injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head.

Headache

A headache is pain or discomfort in the head or face area.

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (also called infantile acquired aphasia, acquired epileptic aphasia or aphasia with convulsive disorder) is a language disorder characterized by the gradual or sudden loss of the ability to use or comprehend spoken language.

Low Back Pain

Low back pain can range from mild, dull, annoying pain, to persistent, severe, disabling pain in the lower back. Pain in the lower back can restrict mobility and interfere with normal functioning.

Lumbar Disc Disease (Herniated Disc)

Lumbar disc disease occurs in the lumbar area of the spine. As discs degenerate, fragments of the disc material can press on the nerve roots located just behind the disc space, causing pain, numbness or changes in sensation.

Lumbar Strain (Weight Lifter's Back)

A lumbar strain is an injury to the lower back, which results in damaged tendons and muscles that spasm and feel sore.

Menieres Disease

Ménière's disease is a balance disorder caused by an abnormality found in a section of the inner ear called the labyrinth.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system. It is thought to be an autoimmune disorder. It is an unpredictable condition that can be relatively benign, disabling, or devastating.

Muscular Contraction and Tension Headaches

Tension headaches are the most common type of headache. Stress and muscle tension are often factors in tension type headaches.

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a complex, autoimmune disorder in which antibodies destroy neuromuscular connections. This causes problems with the voluntary muscles of the body, especially the eyes, mouth, throat, and limbs.

Narcolepsy

Narcolepsy is a chronic, neurological sleep disorder with no known cause. It involves the body's central nervous system. Narcolepsy is a genetic disorder, but what causes narcolepsy is not yet known.

Neurocutaneous Syndromes

Neurocutaneous syndrome is a broad term for a group of neurologic disorders that can cause tumors to grow inside the brain, spinal cord, organs, skin and skeletal bones.

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease (PD or, simply, Parkinson's) is a slowly progressing, degenerative disease that is associated with symptoms such as tremor or trembling of the arms, jaw, legs and face, stiffness or rigidity of the limbs and trunk, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), postural instability or impaired balance and coordination.

Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sleep disorder in which a person experiences unpleasant sensations in the legs.

Seizures

Epilepsy is a neurological condition involving the brain that makes people more susceptible to having seizures.

Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a serious breathing disorder that causes brief interruptions of breathing during sleep.

Spasmodic Dysphonia

Spasmodic dysphonia, also called laryngeal dystonia, is a voice disorder. It is characterized by involuntary spasms or movements in the muscles of the larynx, which causes the voice to break, and have a tight, strained, or strangled sound.

Spinal Cord Injury

Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is due to a traumatic injury that can either result in a bruise (also called a contusion), a partial tear, or a complete tear (called a transection) in the spinal cord.

Stroke

Stroke, also called brain attack, occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted.

Stuttering

Stuttering, sometimes referred to as stammering or diffluent speech, is a speech disorder.

Tourette's Disorder

Tourette's disorder (TD), sometimes called Tourette's syndrome (TS), is a neurological disorder characterized by multiple repeated tics.

Types of Muscular Dystrophy and Neuromuscular Diseases

Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by weakness and wasting away of muscle tissue, with or without the breakdown of nerve tissue.

Vascular Headaches and Migraines

This throbbing type of headache is distinguished by the fact that symptoms other than pain occur with the headache.

The following related clinical trials and research studies are currently seeking participants at Massachusetts General Hospital. Search for clinical trials and studies in another area of interest.

Stroke victim's recovery rare, astonishing

New Bedford woman recovers from severe stroke after treatment by the Mass General Stroke Team, including Mass General Imaging interventional specialist Dr. James Rabinov.

Thrall: Healthcare IT can help rads tackle radiation exposure

It's imperative that radiologists proactively find ways to keep radiation dose to a minimum, and healthcare IT can help, according to Dr. James H. Thrall, who spoke on the topic this week at the New York Medical Imaging Informatics Symposium.

Joshua A. Hirsch, MD, elected president of Society of Neurointerventional Surgery

The SNIS is a national organization of physicians who have special expertise in treating such conditions as stroke, aneurysms, carotid stenosis and spinal abnormalities through minimally invasive procedures.

Neurointerventional surgery journal accepted into Medline

The Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery (JNIS) has been accepted for inclusion in the Medline bibliographic database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM).

NeuroBlast e-Newsletter

NeuroBlast: the newsletter of translational neuroscience and clinical care advances in neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroscience from Massachusetts General Hospital.

MGH Russell Museum Lunchtime Lecture Series

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation invites you to attend its latest lecture in its lunchtime series

Images of Imaging: CT (computed tomography)

Get an inside look at CT exams at Mass General Imaging. Learn about CT technology, the professionals who guide patients through the exam process, and the specialty-trained radiologists who interpret every scan.

Images of Imaging: MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

Learn about MRI exams at Mass General Imaging. See what MRI scanners and images look like, understand MRI safety, and learn about the specialty-trained radiologists who interpret every scan.

Webster Center takes on radiation-dose reduction

Dr. James H. Thrall, Department of Radiology chairman emeritus, discusses The Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, a unique research effort dedicated to reducing radiation dose for every exam Mass General Imaging performs.

Radiation reduction: Our ongoing commitment

As CT (computed tomography) technology has transformed the practice of medicine, Mass General Imaging has dedicated itself to making sure each exam exposes the patient to the lowest achievable amount of radiation. Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, discusses our decade-long commitment—and our success—regarding this issue.

Decision tools support radiation-reduction efforts

One effective way to reduce radiation exposure is to avoid unnecessary exams. That's why Mass General Imaging has been a leader in developing software tools that guide referring physicians by not only making sure the selected exam matches the patient's needs but also suggesting radiation-free alternatives when appropriate.

Imaging specialists, focused on you

Each radiologist at Mass General Imaging is a specialist in a particular area of the body. Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how patients benefit from the additional specialty training our physicians have completed.

Imaging technology enables non-surgical treatments

Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how the ability to see deep inside the body has driven the development of minimally invasive methods of treatment—a trend in which Mass General Imaging has played a key role.

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Discover the Imaging patient experience

Mass General offers specialty-trained radiologists, leading-edge technology and a caring staff that's committed to patient safety and comfort.

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Imaging experts, focused on you

Every scan at Mass General Imaging is read by a radiologist with specialty training in the area of the body being studied.

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Radiation safety

Learn how Mass General Imaging works to increase patient safety by reducing radiation exposure.