Treatment Programs

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Vascular Imaging and Intervention

Working as part of the Vascular Center, the interventional vascular specialists of the Vascular Imaging and Intervention Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging perform minimally invasive, image-guided treatments for conditions including stroke and peripheral vascular disease. These same interventionalists also use minimally invasive techniques to treat non-vascular conditions including uterine fibroids and certain kinds of cancer. In addition, our specialty-trained radiologists use the latest imaging technologies to provide diagnostic exams for a full range of vascular conditions.

Dedicated to diagnosing and treating injuries and diseases of the blood vessels, the Vascular Imaging and Intervention Program provides:

  • A full suite of exams including catheter angiography, CT angiography, MR angiography, and ultrasound.
  • Leading-edge technology, including the latest ultrasound, MRI, and CT scanners.
  • Minimally invasive, image-guided therapeutic procedures, including treatments for PVD (peripheral vascular disease) and varicose veins.
  • Tight coordination with experts across Mass General. In particular, our vascular radiologists are part of the Massachusetts General Hospital Vascular Center, which unites specialists in every area of vascular disease.

Specialist radiologists, dedicated to your care

Every scan is read by a specialty-trained radiologist: an expert who has extensive training and real-world experience in both the imaging technology being used and the area of body in focus.

Our dedicated vascular radiologists, who belong to the Vascular Imaging & Intervention division of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Radiology, are experts in diagnosing disease and injury of the vasculature and devising its therapy. Mass General is a leading center for the management of venous diseases, including varicose veins, thromboembolic disease (often referred to as DVT, deep vein thrombosis), peripheral arterial disease (PAD), pelvic congestion syndrome, traumatic vascular injuries, aortic aneurysms, and endocrine disorders. Our clinicians are board-certified in radiology and fellowship trained with additional specialization in the vascular system. Each also has extensive training in the use of specific types of imaging, such as CT and MRI. Our doctors hold leadership positions in key professional societies that set guidelines for exam procedures and also play leadership roles in many research projects that advance the state of the art in vascular imaging and intervention.

Coordinated care

We work in close consultation with your doctor to schedule and plan your exam. Then we provide swift results, including a written report and image access (if your doctor desires), within 48 to 72 hours.

The vascular radiologists of Mass General Imaging work as part of the Massachusetts General Hospital Vascular Center, one of the only vascular centers in the country with specialists in every area of vascular disease. Clinicians from seven specialties diagnose and treat the full range of vascular conditions, create new treatments and educate the next generation of medical leaders.

Emphasis on safety

At Mass General Imaging, our commitment to safety extends through everything we do, from exam-room procedures to leading-edge research. We pay special attention to minimizing radiation exposure—without giving up image quality. We employ physicists and engineers to calibrate and maintain our equipment at the highest level, and we invest to replace outmoded equipment and bring the latest technology to our patients.

The Vascular Imaging and Intervention Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging offers diagnostic exams and/or image-guided exams for the following conditions.

Aneurysm

An aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the normal diameter

Cerebral Aneurysm

A cerebral aneurysm (also called an intracranial aneurysm or brain aneurysm) is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of an artery in the brain, resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning. Because there is a weakened spot in the artery wall, there is a risk for rupture (bursting) of the aneurysm.

Chronic Pain

Pain is an unpleasant feeling that lets you know that something may be wrong. It is one of the body's warning signals that indicates a problem that needs attention.

Chronic Venous Insufficiency

Chronic venous insufficiency occurs when the leg veins do not allow blood to travel back to the heart.

Claudication

Claudication refers to limping because of pain in the thigh, calf, and/or buttocks that occurs when walking. Claudication may be a symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Thrombophlebitis

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot develops in a vein deep in the body.

Liver Tumors

Tumors are abnormal masses of tissue that form when cells begin to reproduce at an increased rate. The liver can grow both non-cancerous (benign) and cancerous (malignant) tumors.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is cancer that usually starts in the lining of the bronchi (the main airways of the lungs), but can also begin in other areas of the respiratory system, including the trachea, bronchioles, or alveoli.

Peripheral Vascular Disease

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a slow and progressive circulation disorder. It may involve disease in any of the blood vessels outside of the heart and diseases of the lymph vessels - the arteries, veins, or lymphatic vessels.

Pulmonary Embolism

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blood clot that develops in a blood vessel elsewhere in the body (most commonly from the leg), travels to an artery in the lung, and forms an occlusion (blockage) of the artery.

Renal Vascular Disease

Renal vascular disease is the name given to a variety of complications that affect the arteries and veins of the kidneys.

Stroke

Stroke, also called brain attack, occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted.

Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

A thoracic aortic aneurysm, also called TAA, is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of the thoracic aorta (the largest artery in the body), resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning.

Thrombosis

Thrombosis occurs when clots obstruct veins (blood vessels that carry blood from the body back into the heart) or arteries (blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the body).

Uterine Fibroids

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system.

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are enlarged veins that are visible through the skin and may appear as blue or purple twisted, knot-like cords.

Vascular Headaches and Migraines

This throbbing type of headache is distinguished by the fact that symptoms other than pain occur with the headache.

Stroke victim's recovery rare, astonishing

New Bedford woman recovers from severe stroke after treatment by the Mass General Stroke Team, including Mass General Imaging interventional specialist Dr. James Rabinov.

Thrall: Healthcare IT can help rads tackle radiation exposure

It's imperative that radiologists proactively find ways to keep radiation dose to a minimum, and healthcare IT can help, according to Dr. James H. Thrall, who spoke on the topic this week at the New York Medical Imaging Informatics Symposium.

Webster Center takes on radiation-dose reduction

Dr. James H. Thrall, Department of Radiology chairman emeritus, discusses The Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, a unique research effort dedicated to reducing radiation dose for every exam Mass General Imaging performs.

Radiation reduction: Our ongoing commitment

As CT (computed tomography) technology has transformed the practice of medicine, Mass General Imaging has dedicated itself to making sure each exam exposes the patient to the lowest achievable amount of radiation. Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, discusses our decade-long commitment—and our success—regarding this issue.

Decision tools support radiation-reduction efforts

One effective way to reduce radiation exposure is to avoid unnecessary exams. That's why Mass General Imaging has been a leader in developing software tools that guide referring physicians by not only making sure the selected exam matches the patient's needs but also suggesting radiation-free alternatives when appropriate.

Imaging specialists, focused on you

Each radiologist at Mass General Imaging is a specialist in a particular area of the body. Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how patients benefit from the additional specialty training our physicians have completed.

Imaging technology enables non-surgical treatments

Department of Radiology Chairman Emeritus James H. Thrall, MD, explains how the ability to see deep inside the body has driven the development of minimally invasive methods of treatment—a trend in which Mass General Imaging has played a key role.

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Discover the Imaging patient experience

Mass General offers specialty-trained radiologists, leading-edge technology and a caring staff that's committed to patient safety and comfort.

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Radiation safety

Learn how Mass General Imaging works to increase patient safety by reducing radiation exposure.

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Imaging: Powered by radiology specialists

Learn more about the Department of Radiology, the clinical force behind Mass General Imaging.