The Lunder Building

Located at the heart of Mass General's main campus, the state-of-the-art Lunder Building anchors the campus, connecting advanced inpatient and outpatient clinical services offered at nearly half of the buildings on our core campus.

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The Lunder Building

The Lunder Building

Designed for the next generation of patient care

Mass General opened its first clinical facility in 1821, and its groundbreaking design centered on providing the highest quality patient care. Today, the new Lunder Building honors this legacy and offers the next generation of advanced patient care. The 530,000-square-foot, 14-floor facility has 150 new patient beds in the five floors of the W. Gerald Austen, MD Inpatient Care Pavilion, 28 new procedure/operating rooms and expands, co-locates and enhances services in cancer, neurology, neurosurgery, radiation oncology and emergency care.

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Mass General's campus, circa 1821

Mass General's campus, circa 1821

Building for Mass General's third century

For 200 years, Mass General has been at the forefront of patient care, medical innovation and education. Like the Bulfinch Building, pictured here, the Lunder Building reflects this progressive tradition, with its state-of-the-art facilities and leading-edge technology. As Mass General celebrates its history as a global leader in medicine, it steps into the future with the Lunder Building.

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Paula and Peter Lunder

Paula and Peter Lunder

Generous gift supports a legacy of care

The Lunder Building is named in recognition of an extraordinary gift from Peter and Paula Lunder and the Lunder Foundation. Their generous contribution honors several Mass General doctors and our exceptional nursing staff. It also establishes the James J. Dineen, MD, Maine-Mass General Health Education Partnership, designed to increase the teaching and training resources available to caregivers, veterans, patients and families in the state of Maine.

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The Bander Bridge

The Bander Bridge

New pathways connect the Mass General campus

Patients, clinicians and visitors can now travel between the Yawkey Center for Outpatient Care and the hospital's core campus without having to step outside. The Martin and Kay Bander Bridge, a pedestrian bridge over Fruit Street, connects the Yawkey Building to the Lunder Building. Inside Lunder, people walk through the Paul and Catherine Braverman Gallery to the White Lobby at Mass General's main entrance, which provides access to the main campus complex. The Bander Bridge is open daily from 6 am to 8 pm.

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New triage area for emergency patients

New triage area for emergency patients

Quicker access to emergency care

The 88,000 patients who receive emergency care at Mass General each year will benefit from expanded services at the Lunder Building. The new Sumner M. Redstone Emergency Department for Adults & Children offers state-of-the-art critical and acute care, hazardous materials decontamination and a new triage process that decreases patient wait times. Clinical greeters assess patients and guide them to treatment, screening or waiting rooms. Ambulance bays are located inside, offering privacy and shelter from weather.

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A hybrid operating room

A hybrid operating room

Operating rooms enhance patient care

Many of the Lunder Building's 28 operating/procedure rooms bring state-of-the-art technology to a traditional operating room. Specialized rooms, called "hybrid" operating rooms, offer the next generation of personalized surgical care because the rooms accommodate the needs of each patient. Surgical teams can place imaging equipment exactly where it needs to be without moving the patient. Patients also undergo imaging, surgery and image-guided surgery in the same room.

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State-of-the-art floating equipment

State-of-the-art floating equipment

Innovative equipment promotes healing

Patient care rooms in the Austen Pavilion of the Lunder Building incorporate advanced technology and features to enhance patient safety, healing and infection prevention. In the operating/procedure rooms, ceiling-mounted equipment booms raise surgical equipment off the floor. This feature offers easier access for medical teams and promotes infection control. Similar innovations are built into ICU rooms, which have adaptable features such as ICU centers that allow nurses to arrange the room according to patient needs.

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The Heathwood Exterior Garden

The Heathwood Exterior Garden

A healthy environment that promotes healing

The Lunder Building's sustainable design creates a healthy environment by combining the science of green building with the healing power of nature. Natural light floods patient rooms and common areas. Furniture and finishes are free of volatile organic compounds. Enhanced ventilation creates healthy indoor air and eliminates toxins. Rooftop gardens increase oxygen and require no irrigation. Design features reduce consumption of energy by 10% and water by 1.4 million gallons each year.

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River view from the Austen Pavilion

River view from the Austen Pavilion

The W. Gerald Austen, MD Inpatient Care Pavilion

The five-floor Austen Pavilion brings leading-edge technology and inpatient accommodations to a nature-inspired environment. Each floor features a visitor lounge and a blue information desk, where greeters direct visitors to patient rooms. All inpatient rooms are private and many have views of the city, river or the James and Carol Herscot Atrium, which rises through the pavilion. The Austen Pavilion is also home to the Heathwood Exterior Garden, an outdoor space that brings the healing benefits of nature inside the hospital.

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State-of-the-art rooms adapt to specialized patient needs

Patient room with a Herscot Atrium view

State-of-the-art rooms adapt to specialized patient needs

All of the inpatient rooms in the Austen Pavilion of the Lunder Building are designed to offer highly-specialized patient- and family-centered care and incorporate the specific needs of neurology, neurosurgery and cancer patients into each room. All rooms feature a nurse station and locked drawer for medications. Amenities include a safe for patient belongings and a flat-screen television. Loved ones can stay close in the adjacent family rooms or within each patient room on a reclining chair or sofa bed.

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The James and Carol Herscot Atrium

The Herscot Atrium

The James and Carol Herscot Atrium brings nature inside

The Herscot Atrium is a key element of the building design, creating a healing environment for patients, families and staff. The atrium begins on the sixth floor with a garden and fills the building with natural light. Baskets of large, self-watering plants hang at various levels throughout the atrium, and patient rooms overlook the atrium through glass walls. A thicket of lush bamboo provides privacy for the rooms adjacent to the garden, a relaxing space for reflection and renewal.

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A linear accelerator

A linear accelerator

Radiation oncology center offers new treatment technologies

The Clark Center for Radiation Oncology includes four new linear accelerators equipped with the latest radiation therapy technologies. Daily CT scans help clinicians plan patient treatments and evaluate tumor changes. New treatment tables help detect and correct patient positioning during treatment. Comfortable waiting spaces, more exam rooms and wellness services enhance the patient experience. The connected campus makes travel easy for patients with same-day appointments.

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Central Sterile Processing and Supplies

Central Sterile Processing and Supplies

Equipment sterilization gets a dedicated floor

Each day, more than 100 staff members prepare instruments and supplies for up to 70 operating rooms. In the new Central Sterile Processing and Supplies, one of the largest units in the country, ergonomic innovations increase staff comfort and promote workflow. The 25,000-square-foot space is divided into zones for receiving, sorting, washing, preparation, inspection and assembly. Once sterilized, items are transported along a dedicated pathway to the operating rooms.

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Jim O'Connell, MD, in the community

Jim O'Connell, MD, in the community

$18.6 million pledge to build healthier communities

Mass General continues its long-standing commitment to fostering healthy communities with an $18.6 million pledge, supported by the Lunder Building project. Over the next five to seven years, Mass General will partner with more than 20 community organizations to improve health care access among the diverse population of Greater Boston, including programs for seniors, public school students, mental health care for homeless individuals, and substance abuse and violence prevention.

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The Lunder building, left

The Lunder building, left

Patients and visitors welcome

One of nearly 30 buildings on Mass General's main campus, the Lunder Building expands the clinical services available to the 48,000 patients admitted each year, as well as to outpatients, who recorded nearly 1.4 million visits in 2009. Whether you are a current patient or new to Mass General, we look forward to partnering with you in your care. The visitor information section of our website can help you plan your visit or find information about our health centers and community locations. Learn more

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Visiting the Lunder Building

Find information to plan your visit to the Lunder Building and Mass General's main campus in Boston.