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Paul L. Huang, MD, PhD

Director, MGH Cardiac Metabolic Syndrome Program

Physician, MGH

Paul L. Huang, MD, PhD, is Director of the MGH Cardiac Metabolic Syndrome Program and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

  • Phone: 617-724-6750
Departments
Cardiology
Department of Medicine

Specialties

  • Heart Center
  • Heart Valve Program
  • Non-invasive Cardiology
  • General Clinical Cardiology
  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Center
  • Coronary Artery Disease Program
Clinical Interests
Obesity medicine
Internal medicine
Cardiovascular disease
Locations
Boston: Massachusetts General Hospital
Medical Education
MD, Harvard Medical School
PhD, Harvard Medical School
Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital
Fellowship, Massachusetts General Hospital
Board Certifications
Cardiovascular Disease, American Board of Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Foreign Languages
French
Mandarin
Patient Age Group
Adult
Accepting New Patients
Yes

Biography

Dr. Paul Huang graduated Columbia College summa cum laude at the age of 17. He received his MD and PhD degrees from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Huang completed his Internal Medicine residency and Cardiology fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital, and was selected Chief Medical Resident in 1990. He is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Huang is known internationally as a leader in the area of nitric oxide (NO) biology. His most important contributions include defining the roles for NO in atherosclerosis and heart disease. His research laboratory at the MGH Cardiovascular Research Center studies the molecular mechanisms linking diabetes, obesity and hyerlipidemia to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. He also leads CAMP MGH (Cardiovascular and Metabolic Patient Cohort), a large clinical research project that draws subjects from MGH Heart Center patients. Dr. Huang has been an Established Investigator of the AHA, and was elected to the American Society of Clinical Investigators. He serves on a variety of grant review committees for the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association, and is a Principal Investigator in the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.

Dr. Huang's clinical interests are in cardiovascular disease prevention. He sees general cardiology patients and directs the MGH Cardiac Metabolic Syndrome Program, which includes the 12 week longitudinal Learn to be Lean program for cardiovascular risk reduction.

Research

Dr. Paul Huang's research focuses on the roles of nitric oxide (NO) in cardiovascular disease and metabolism, using techniques ranging from molecular biology, physiology, and genetically altered mouse models, to human translational studies and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell approaches. His research laboratory is studying how the metabolic abnormalities seen in diabetes and obesity affect vascular function and predispose to cardiovascular disease, including stroke and heart attack. His most recent work shows the importance of eNOS phosphorylation to atherosclerosis, stroke, and insulin resistance. Clinically, Dr. Huang leads the Cardiac Metabolic Syndrome Program in the MGH Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Center. He is PI of the translational research CAMP MGH Study (MGH Cardiology and Metabolic Patient Cohort), the first and largest cohort derived from MGH Heart Center patients with detailed phenotyping, genotyping, and physiologic characterization of glucose tolerance and vascular dysfunction. As a member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Dr. Huang is deriving iPS cells from subjects carrying genetic variants that increase risk for type 2 diabetes to test beta cell function, and from subjects with chemotherapy induced cardiomyopathy to test cardiac myocytes contractility.

Publications

View my most recent publications at PubMed

Selected recent publications

1. Huang PL. Creating a comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome. Dis Models Mech 2009; 2: 231-7.

2. Huang PL. eNOS, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Trends Endocrinol Metab 2009; 20: 295-302.

3. Schleicher M, Yu J, Murata T, Derakhshan B, Atochin D, Qian L, Kashiwagi S, Di Lorenzo AD, Harrison KD, Huang PL* and Sessa WC*. The Akt1-eNOS axis illustrates the specificity of kinase/substrate relationships in vivo. Science Signaling 2009, 2: ra41.

4. Rask-Madsen C, Li, Q, Freund B, Feather D, Abramov R, Wu IH, Chen K, Yamamoto-Hiraoka J, Goldenbogen J, Sotiropoulos KB, Clermont A, Geraldes P, Dal'Osso C, Wagers AJ, Huang PL, Rekhter M, Scalia R, Kahn CR and King GL. Loss of insulin signaling in vascular endothelial cells accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E null mice. Cell Metabolism 2010; 11: 379-89.

5. Huang PL. HDAC5: Going with the flow. Blood 2010; 115: 2728-9.

6. Atochin DN, Yuzawa I, Li Q, Rauwerdkin K, Malhotra R, Brouckaert P, Ayata C, Moskowitz MA, Bloch KD, Huang PL*, Buys ES*. Soluble guanylate cyclase alpha 1 beta 1 limits stroke size and attenuates neurological injury. Stroke 2010; 41: 1815-9.

7. Ling Y, Pong T, Vassiliou CC, Huang PL, Cima MJ. Implantable magnetic sensors measure cumulative exposure to cardiac biomarkers. Nature Biotechnol 2011, in press.

Mass General experts discuss diabetes

Our physicians discuss the education, management and prevention of diabetes, a condition affecting nearly 24 million adults and children in the United States.

Cardiac Unit Associates
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114-2696

Phone: 617-724-6750
Fax: 617-724-6767

Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Center
25 New Chardon Street
Boston, MA 02114-4774

Phone: 617-726-1843