Physician Photo

Alice Tsang Shaw, MD, PhD

Alice Tsang Shaw, MD, PhD, is a thoracic oncologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center.

  • Phone: 617-724-4000
Departments
Hematology/Oncology
Department of Medicine

Specialties

  • Cancer Center
  • Thoracic Cancers
  • Lung Cancer
Clinical Interests
Lung cancer treatment
Locations
Boston: Massachusetts General Hospital
Medical Education
MD, Harvard Medical School
PhD, Harvard University
Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital
Fellowship, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Board Certifications
Medical Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Patient Age Group
Adult
Accepting New Patients
Yes

BiographyAlice T. Shaw, MD, PhD, is an attending physician in the Center for Thoracic Cancers at Massachusetts General Hospital, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a clinical investigator at MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. In addition to caring for patients with lung cancer, Dr. Shaw also performs clinical and translational research.

Dr. Shaw's major research interests include studying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLS); developing targeted strategies to treat NSCLCs harboring activating KRAS mutations; discovering new targets in NSCLC using both genetic and phosphoproteomic strategies; and developing novel nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery systems to target genetically defined subsets of lung cancer. Dr Shaw has been awarded a number of research grants, including grants from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the Burroughs Welcome Fund, the V Foundation for Cancer Research, and the NIH/NCI.

Alice Shaw, MD, explains why patients with lung cancer can benefit from genetic testing

Alice Shaw, MD, thoracic oncologist at the Mass General Cancer Center, says patients with lung cancer can benefit from genetic testing, particularly if they are young non-smokers. Learn more about personalized treatment for lung cancer and new "smart drugs" that target a tumor's specific genetic mutation to slow the cancer's growth, and in some cases, reduce it significantly.

Mass. General study defines a new genetic subtype of lung cancer

MGH Cancer Center investigators have defined the role of a recently identified gene abnormality – rearrangements in the ROS1 gene – in non-small-cell lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. They also show that these tumors can be treated with crizotinib and describe the remarkable response of one patient to such treatment.

Phase III trial shows crizotinib superior to single-agent chemotherapy for ALK-positive lung cancer

The results of a new phase III trial show that crizotinib, a targeted therapy, is a more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy for patients with advanced, ALK-positive lung cancer.

MGH-led studies shed new light on targeted lung cancer therapy

Research teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center investigators are publishing two important studies regarding use of the targeted cancer drug crizotinib for treatment of advanced lung cancer driven by specific genetic mutations.

New drug successfully treats crizotinib-resistant, ALK-positive lung cancer

A new drug called ceritinib appears to be effective against advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer, both in tumors that have become resistant to crizotinib and in those never treated with the older drug.

Hematology/Oncology
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114-2696

Phone: 617-724-4000
Fax: 617-726-0453