Physician Photo

Lecia V. Sequist, MD

  • Phone: 617-724-4000
Departments
Hematology/Oncology
Department of Medicine

Specialties

  • Cancer Center
  • Thoracic Cancers
  • Lung Cancer
Clinical Interests
Lung Cancer
Genetic testing
Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation
Targeted therapies
Clinical trials
Locations
Boston: Massachusetts General Hospital
Medical Education
MD, Harvard Medical School
Residency, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Fellowship, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Board Certifications
Medical Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Patient Age Group
Adult
Accepting New Patients
Yes

BiographyDr. Sequist is originally from Michigan and studied chemistry at Cornell University. She received her MD from Harvard Medical School and trained in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and in hematology/oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where she also received an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She joined the faculty of the Center for Thoracic Cancers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in 2005 and has an active clinical and translational research career, as well as a busy practice caring for patients with lung cancer. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Sequist's research focuses on studying novel targets and targeted agents for lung cancer treatment, particularly those that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and in detecting and studying the significance of tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream (circulating tumor cells, or CTCs). She aims to develop treatment algorithms for lung cancer that are more personalized than current strategies, utilizing targeted therapies specific to the patients' cancer genotypes, and understanding how this may change over the courses of the disease.

Cancer Center physicians honored

The Henri and Belinda Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies in the MGH Cancer Center has three new endowed leadership positions.

Mass. General study reveals how lung cancers evolve in response to targeted treatment

A detailed analysis of lung tumors that became resistant to targeted therapy drugs has revealed two previously unreported resistance mechanisms. The report also describes how the cellular nature of some tumors can change in response to treatment and finds how resistance-conferring mutations can disappear after treatment is discontinued.

Hematology/Oncology
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114-2696

Phone: 617-724-4000
Fax: 617-726-0453