Physician Photo

Steven M. (Steve) Greenberg, MD, PhD

Director, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program

Vice-Chair, Faculty Development and Promotions

John J. Conway Endowed Chair in Neurology

  • Phone: 617-726-8459
Departments
Department of Neurology

Specialties

  • Vascular Center
  • Neurology
Clinical Interests
Cerebral hemorrhage
Dementia
Stroke
Locations
Boston: Massachusetts General Hospital
Medical Education
PhD, Columbia University
MD, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital
Fellowship, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Board Certifications
Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
Vascular Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
Gender
Male
Patient Gateway
Yes, learn more
Patient Age Group
Adult
Accepting New Patients
Yes

Biography

Dr. Greenberg, Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, holds the John J. Conway Endowed Chair in Neurology, directs the Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, and is Vice-Chair for Faculty Development and Promotions at the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Initiated in 1994, the Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program has become internationally recognized as a leading authority on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.  Dr. Greenberg has authored over 140 research articles and 60 chapters, reviews, and editorials in the areas of hemorrhagic stroke and small vessel brain disease, served as principal investigator on multiple national research grants, and in leadership positions at national and international conferences on hemorrhagic stroke and vascular cognitive impairment.  He is currently Chair of the American Heart Association International Stroke Conference, Session Co-Chair of the NINDS Alzheimer's Disease-Related Dementias Workshop, and charter member of the NIH Acute Neural Injury and Epilepsy study section.

Dr. Greenberg received his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from Harvard University and MD and PhD degrees from Columbia University under the graduate research training of Dr. James Schwartz.  He performed internship at Pennsylvania Hospital, neurology residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, and post-doctoral fellowship at the Brigham and Women's Hospital Center for Neurologic Diseases before joining the Massachusetts General Hospital faculty.

Research

Dr. Greenberg has authored over 140 research articles and 60 chapters, reviews, and editorials in the areas of hemorrhagic stroke and small vessel brain disease, served as principal investigator on multiple national research grants, and in leadership positions at national and international conferences on hemorrhagic stroke and vascular cognitive impairment.  He is currently Chair of the American Heart Association International Stroke Conference, Session Co-Chair of the NINDS Alzheimer's Disease-Related Dementias Workshop, and charter member of the NIH Acute Neural Injury and Epilepsy study section.

Publications

View my most recent publications at PubMed

Linn J, Halpin A, Demaerel P, Ruhland J, Giese AD, Dichgans M, van Buchem MA, Bruckmann H, Greenberg SM. Prevalence of superficial siderosis in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Neurology 2010;74:1346-1350.

Greenberg SM, Nandigam RNK, Delgado P, Betensky RA, Rosand J, Viswanathan A, Frosch MP, Smith EE. Microbleeds versus macrobleeds: Evidence for distinct entities. Stroke 2009;40:2382-6.

Kimberly WT, Gilson A, Rost NS, Rosand J, Viswanathan A, Smith EE, Greenberg SM. Silent ischemic infarcts are associated with hemorrhage burden in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Neurology 2009;72:1230-1235.

Holland CM, Smith EE, Csapo I, Gurol ME, Brylka DA, Killiany RJ, Blacker D, Albert MS, Guttmann CRG, Greenberg SM. Spatial distribution of white matter hyperintensities in Alzheimers disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and healthy aging. Stroke 2008;39:1127-1133.

Greenberg SM, Grabowski TJ, Gurol ME, Skehan ME, Nandigam RNK, Becker JA, Garcia-Alloza M, Prada C, Frosch MP, Rosand J, Viswanathan A, Smith EE, Johnson KA. Detection of isolated cerebrovascular ?-amyloid with Pittsburgh compound B. Ann Neurol 2008;64:587-591.

Statin risks may outweigh benefits for patients with a history of brain hemorrhage

A computer decision model suggests that for patients with a history of bleeding within the brain, the risk of recurrence associated with statin treatment may outweigh the benefit of the drug in preventing cardiovascular disease, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the May print issue of Archives of Neurology.

Neurology & Stroke Services
15 Parkman Street
Boston, MA 02114-3117

Phone: 617-726-8459
Fax: 617-726-5346