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Neuromuscular Disease Service, Child Neurology

Specialists in the Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic at MassGeneral Hospital for Children evaluate children with hyporeflexia, low muscle tone, muscle weakness, delayed motor skills, muscle pain, cramping, or who have an inherited neuromuscular disease or genetic risk.

Neuromuscular Doctors

The Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic offers coordinated, multidisciplinary care for infants, children and adolescents with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders.

In the clinic, we evaluate infants, children and adolescents who may have low muscle tone, muscle weakness, delayed motor skills, muscle pain or cramping, or who have an inherited neuromuscular disease.

A close association with colleagues in the adult neuromuscular clinic allows not only easy conferencing with its world renowned researchers, but also smooth continuity of care as the patient matures from an adolescent to an adult.

Read more about the Pediatric Neuromuscular Service on the MGH for Children website.

Clinical Coordinator

Phone: 617-643-4645

Clinic Address

Massachusetts General Hospital
Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic
165 Cambridge Street
Floor 8, Suite 820
Boston, MA 02114

Neuromuscular Doctors

The Neuromuscular Clinic is a designated MDA (Muscular Dystophy Association) Clinic and offers innovative treatments for Duschenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

An initial evaluation includes an extensive conference with parents and an examination of the child. The pediatric neurologist sends a summary note of findings to the referring physician and the parents.

Based on exam findings, treatment recommendations could involve a multidisciplinary treatment team including physical and occupational therapists and recommendations for early intervention or school-based therapy. If it is not convenient for a child to receive treatment at the Neuromuscular Clinic, staff arranges for the appropriate resources nearer the child's home community.

New Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic

A new Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic was formed in the fall of 2007. The clinic shares the same address with the Mass General Neuromuscular Diagnostic Center, at 165 Cambridge Street, Suite 820.

Neuromuscular disorders seen at the clinic include those listed below, as well as other rare disorders.

  • Neuromuscular junction disorders - including myesthenia gravis, congenital myasthenia, and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome
  • Myopathies - including muscular dystrophy, metabolic myopathies, mitochondrial myopathies, inflammatory and toxic myopathies
  • Peripheral neuropathies - including Charçot-Marie-Tooth disease and other hereditary neuropathies, acquired neuropathies such as acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies, vasculitic and toxic myopathies

Read more about the Pediatric Neuromuscular Service on the MGH for Children website.

Clinical Coordinator

Phone: 617-643-4645

Clinic Address

Massachusetts General Hospital
Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic
165 Cambridge Street
Floor 8, Suite 820
Boston, MA 02114

 

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a complex, autoimmune disorder in which antibodies destroy neuromuscular connections. This causes problems with the voluntary muscles of the body, especially the eyes, mouth, throat, and limbs.

Types of Muscular Dystrophy and Neuromuscular Diseases

Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by weakness and wasting away of muscle tissue, with or without the breakdown of nerve tissue.

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