News Releases

Browse releases covering breaking news and recent headlines at Massachusetts General Hospital.

10/17/2014: Study finds inconsistent achievement of guidelines for acute asthma care in hospital EDs

A study comparing the care delivered to patients coming to hospital emergency departments for acute asthma attacks in recent years with data gathered more than 15 years earlier finds that, while achievement of most guidelines defining appropriate pharmacologic treatments for particular patients improved, hospitals did less well in meeting several other guidelines.

10/15/2014: MGH and MIT form strategic partnership to address major challenges in clinical medicine

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases.

10/13/2014: Chemical present in broccoli, other vegetables may improve autism symptoms

A small study led by investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has found evidence that daily treatment with sulforaphane – a molecule found in foods such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage – may improve some symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

10/12/2014: Novel culture system replicates course of Alzheimer’s disease, confirms amyloid hypothesis

An innovative laboratory culture system has succeeded, for the first time, in reproducing the full course of events underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Using the system they developed, MGH investigators provide the first clear evidence supporting the hypothesis that deposition of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a cascade leading to the devastating neurodegenerative disease.

10/11/2014: Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant

A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent C. difficile infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube.

10/03/2014: Vitamin D supplements significantly improve symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis in children

A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema.

10/03/2014: Mass. General study suggests neurobiological basis of human-pet relationship

How closely does the relationship between people and their non-human companions mirror the parent-child relationship? A small study from a group of MGH researchers contributes to answering this complex question by investigating differences in how important brain structures are activated when women view images of their children and of their own dogs.

10/01/2014: Delayed introduction to gluten appears not to prevent celiac disease in at-risk infants

An study led by investigators at the MGHfC Center for Celiac Research and Treatment finds that neither breastfeeding nor delaying the introduction of gluten-containing foods prevents or delays the development of celiac disease in at-risk children.

10/01/2014: ‘Smart’ Bandage Emits Phosphorescent Glow for Healing Below

Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration.

09/27/2014: Crizotinib treatment effective against ROS1-positive lung cancer

Treatment with the targeted therapy drug crizotinib effectively halts the growth of lung tumors driven by rearrangements of the ROS1 gene

09/26/2014: Policies of NIH, other funders, have improved data-sharing by life-science investigators

Policies put into place by major funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health, and to a lesser extent by scientific journals, appear to be meeting the goal of increasing the sharing of scientific resources among life science investigators.

09/22/2014: Mass. General study reveals gene expression patterns in pancreatic circulating tumor cells

Analysis of circulating tumor cells in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of CTCs, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to the ability to generate metastases and prove to be targets for improved treatment of the deadly tumor.

09/16/2014: Point-of-care CD4 testing is economically feasible for HIV care in resource-limited areas

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, working in collaboration with colleagues in Mozambique and South Africa, indicates that routine point-of-care CD4 testing at the time of HIV diagnosis could be cost effective in countries where health care and other resources are severely limited.

09/11/2014: A non-toxic strategy to treat leukemia

A study comparing how blood stem cells and leukemia cells consume nutrients found that cancer cells are far less tolerant to shifts in their energy supply than their normal counterparts. The results suggest that there could be ways to target leukemia metabolism so that cancer cells die but other cell types are undisturbed.

09/03/2014: Digital mammography system developed at Mass. General Hospital receives FDA approval

A digital mammography system developed based on concepts originally tested at MGH has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

09/03/2014: One Fund Center Launches in September to Offer Ongoing Care for those affected by the Marathon Bombings

The One Fund Boston, Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary today announced the creation of the One Fund Center, a collaboration that will offer ongoing care to those affected by the often invisible, yet persistent, injuries sustained in the Boston Marathon bombings.

09/02/2014: Cannabis withdrawal symptoms common among adolescents treated for substance use disorder

Although cannabis – commonly known as marijuana – is broadly believed to be nonaddictive, a study by MGH investigators found that 40 percent of cannabis-using adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for substance use disorder experienced symptoms of withdrawal, which are considered a hallmark of drug dependence.

08/28/2014: Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells

Circulating tumor cell clusters – clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream – appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the MGH Cancer Center.

08/26/2014: Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk

Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression.

08/19/2014: Repeat ED visits for acute heart failure suggest need for better outpatient care

Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments in Florida and California during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care.

08/19/2014: Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge

An MGH program described in the August 20 issue of JAMA increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent.

08/18/2014: Mass. General-developed device monitors key step in development of tumor metastases

A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a fundamental change in cellular characteristics that has been associated with the ability of tumor cells to migrate and invade other sites.

08/13/2014: Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models

An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death.

08/12/2014: Grants announced for Building a Healthier Charlestown

Massachusetts General Hospital’s Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI) and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital recently announced the distribution of $118,628 in grant funding through Building a Healthier Charlestown to two Charlestown collaboratives.

08/06/2014: Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

In a New England Journal of Medicine article and a issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund, two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians and their co-authors outline best practices in complex care management, discuss barriers to wider adoption of the approach and describe potential strategies to surmount those barriers.

07/31/2014: Innovative “genotype first” approach uncovers protective factor for heart disease

Extensive sequencing of DNA from thousands of individuals in Finland has unearthed scores of mutations that destroy gene function and are found at unusually high frequencies. Among these are two mutations in a gene called LPA that may reduce a person’s risk of heart disease.

07/28/2014: Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia

Stimulating one of two dopamine-producing regions in the brain was able to arouse animals receiving general anesthesia with either isoflurane or propofol.

07/28/2014: Non-endoscopic migraine surgery provides significant symptom relief in Mass. General patients

A revised version of a surgical procedure to treat severe chronic migraine headaches led to significant symptom relief more than 90 percent of the time in a group of patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital.

07/19/2014: Drug that reduces abdominal fat in HIV patients also may reduce fat in liver

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients.

07/10/2014: Cultured circulating tumor cells reveal genetic profile, potential drug susceptibility of breast cancer cells

Circulating tumor cells captured with a microchip-based device developed at the MGH Center for Engineering in Medicine and the MGH Cancer Center can be cultured to establish cell lines that accurately reflect a tumor’s genetic mutation over time and changing susceptibility to therapeutic drugs.

07/08/2014: Siblings may have a greater influence than parents on a child’s obesity risk

A new report led by an investigator at the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH finds that the risk associated with having an obese sibling is more than twice as great as that of having an obese parent and is even stronger among siblings of the same gender.

07/01/2014: MGH ARCH Program Partners with the John F. Kennedy Family Center

For more than a decade, the MGH ARCH Program has partnered with organizations in the community to meet their needs for high-quality health information and resources. There have been eight projects since 2000.

06/30/2014: Studies provide important new information on genetic risk of sudden cardiac death

Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with MGH and the Broad Institute, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias.

06/29/2014: Mass. General-developed protocol could greatly extend preservation of donor livers

A system developed by investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine allowed successful transplantation of rat livers after preservation for as long as four days, more than tripling the length of time organs currently can be preserved.

06/19/2014: UV-induced beta-endorphin production causes addiction-like symptoms in mice

A new study from MGH investigators adds important support to the theory that ultraviolet light can actually be addictive, finding that chronic UV exposure raises circulating levels of beta-endorphin in mice and that UV-habituated mice exhibit withdrawal symptoms if beta-endorphin activity is blocked.

06/18/2014: Broken gene found to protect against heart disease

By scouring the DNA of thousands of patients, researchers have discovered four rare gene mutations that not only lower the levels of triglycerides but also significantly reduce a person’s risk of coronary heart disease

06/15/2014: Bionic pancreas successfully controls blood sugar levels in adults, adolescents with type 1 diabetes

The latest version of a bionic pancreas device has been successfully tested in two five-day clinical trials – one in adults, the other in adolescents – that imposed minimal restrictions on patient activities.

06/11/2014: MGH/Ragon Institute study finds how protein blocks HIV life cycle in elite controllers

Investigators from MGH and the Ragon Institute have learned more about one way the immune systems of elite controllers – those rare individuals able to control HIV infection without drug treatment – block a key step in the virus’s life cycle.

06/10/2014: International team unearths strong genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Latin American populations

In the largest study of its kind published to date, an international team of researchers in Mexico and the United States has discovered a strong genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes that primarily affects Latin American patients, but is rare elsewhere.

05/29/2014: Activation of brain region can change a monkey's choice

Artificially stimulating a brain region believed to play a key role in learning, reward and motivation induced monkeys to change which of two images they choose to look at.

05/28/2014: Massachusetts General Hospital and CBS Cares collaborate to encourage safe sex among sexually active senior citizens.

As STD rates for seniors soar, a new PSA campaign encourages children and grandchildren to discuss safe sex with their single parents and grandparents.

05/27/2014: MGH Announces Initiative to Develop Implantable Device to Treat PTSD and TBI

New research initiative is designed to treat PTSD TBI, and other neurological and psychiatric disorders.

05/27/2014: Skin grafts from genetically modified pigs may offer alternative for treatment of serious burns

A specially-bred strain of miniature swine lacking the molecule responsible for the rapid rejection of pig-to-primate organ transplants may provide a new source of skin grafts to treat seriously burned patients.

05/21/2014: Pulsed electrical fields destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria infecting burn injuries

Application of a technology currently used to disinfect food products may help to get around one of the most challenging problems in medicine today, the proliferation of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.

05/19/2014: Chronic insufficient sleep increases obesity, overall body fat in children

One of the most comprehensive studies of the potential link between reduced sleep and childhood obesity finds compelling evidence that children who consistently received less than the recommended hours of sleep during infancy and early childhood had increases in both obesity and in adiposity or overall body fat at age 7.

05/16/2014: Transgenic mice produce both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on carbohydrate diet

MGH investigators have developed a transgenic mouse that synthesizes both the omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids within its tissues on a diet of carbohydrates or saturated fats. Significant evidence suggest that the ratio of dietary omega-6 to omega-3 has important implications for human health.

05/16/2014: Herpes-loaded stem cells used to kill brain tumors

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have a potential solution for how to more effectively kill tumor cells using cancer-killing viruses.

05/09/2014: Study identifies mechanism by which intestinal enzyme maintains microbial balance

MGH investigators have identified the mechanism by which an enzyme produced in the intestinal lining helps to maintain a healthy population of gastrointestinal microbes.

05/06/2014: Donor livers preserved and improved with room-temperature perfusion system

A system developed by investigators at the MGH Center for Engineering in Medicine and the MGH Transplant Center has the potential to increase both the supply and the quality of donor organs for liver transplantation.

04/30/2014: In recognizing speech sounds, the brain does not work the way a computer does

How does the brain decide whether something is correct? When it comes to the processing of spoken language, the theory has been that the brain applies a set of rules to determine which combinations of sounds are permissible. Now the work of MGH investigators suggests that the brain decides based on the words that are already known.

04/25/2014: New genome-editing platform significantly increases accuracy of CRISPR-based systems

A next-generation genome editing system developed by MGH investigators substantially decreases the risk of producing unwanted, off-target gene mutations.

04/24/2014: Use of frozen material for fecal transplant successful in treating C. difficile infection

A pilot study by Massachusetts General Hospital MGH investigators may lead to greater availability and acceptability of an unusual treatment for a serious medical problem – use of fecal material from healthy donors to treat recurrent diarrhea caused by C. difficile bacteria.

04/24/2014: Genomics' daunting challenge: Identifying variants that matter

While the latest genome sequencing technologies can generate detailed catalogs of genomic variants, researchers face an ongoing challenge of distinguishing variants that cause disease from those that do not.

04/23/2014: Study Shows Aspirin Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risks for Those with Specific Gene

Researchers from MGH, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine have shown that aspirin’s previous reported ability to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer applies only to individuals with high levels of a specific gene product in their colons.

04/21/2014: Fast, simple-to-use assay reveals the ‘family tree’ of cancer metastases

A simple assay developed by an MGH research team can reveal the evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within a patient, information that may someday help with treatment planning.

04/15/2014: Casual marijuana use changes brain structures involved in reward, emotion and motivation

Even casual use of marijuana appears to cause significant structural changes in key brain structures of young adults, a new study finds. Researchers from MGH and Northwestern University have found differences between casual users of marijuana and non-users in the size, shape, and structure of brain regions involved with motivation, emotion and reward.

04/14/2014: Long-term study supports detrimental effects of television viewing on sleep in young children

A study following more than 1,800 children from ages 6 months to nearly 8 years found a small but consistent association between increased television viewing and shorter sleep duration.

04/10/2014: Researchers identify transcription factors distinguishing glioblastoma stem cells

The activity of four transcription factors appears to distinguish the small proportion of glioblastoma cells responsible for the aggressiveness and treatment resistance of the deadly brain tumor. The findings identify molecular circuits that may be targeted by new therapeutic approaches

04/09/2014: Study confirms impact of clinician-patient relationship on health outcomes

A meta-analysis of studies that investigated measures designed to improve health professionals’ interactions with patients confirms that such efforts can produce health effects just as beneficial as taking a daily aspirin to prevent heart attack.

04/03/2014: An ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3-D microtissue engineering

A team of researchers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital have demonstrated a new nanoscale matrix biomaterial assembly that can maintain liver cell morphology and function in microfluidic devices for longer times than has been previously been reported in microfluidic devices.

03/28/2014: EAST BOSTON RESIDENTS ASKED TO COMPLETE QUALITY OF LIFE SURVEY FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ASSESSMENT

East Boston residents have a chance to improve their community by completing the East Boston Quality of Life Survey. Residents are urged to complete the survey to describe the most important health issues that affect East Boston residents today. All answers are anonymous.

03/26/2014: New drug successfully treats crizotinib-resistant, ALK-positive lung cancer

A new drug called ceritinib appears to be effective against advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer, both in tumors that have become resistant to crizotinib and in those never treated with the older drug.

03/23/2014: Mass. General study identifies path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer

MGH investigators may have found a way to solve a problem that has plagued a group of drugs called ligand-mimicking integrin inhibitors, which have the potential to treat conditions ranging from heart attacks to cancer metastasis.

03/21/2014: Food insecurity linked to cost-related medication underuse in chronically ill Americans

Chronically ill adults who reported not having consistent access to food due to financial instability were significantly more likely to report taking less than prescribed doses of medication because of cost concerns.

03/12/2014: Newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients show imbalance in intestinal microbial population

A multi-institutional study led by investigators from MGH and the Broad Institute has identified how the intestinal microbial population of newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients differs from that of individuals free of inflammatory bowel disease.

03/11/2014: Patients with repeat ED visits for opioid overdose more likely to be hospitalized, require respiratory support

A study conducted by MGH investigators found that patients brought to hospital emergency departments more than once in a year for treatment of opioid drug overdoses are more likely to be hospitalized for overdose and to need respiratory support with a mechanical ventilator. The study also identified factors that increased the risk of subsequent overdoses requiring emergency department visits.

03/05/2014: Novel cancer vaccine holds promise against ovarian cancer, mesothelioma

A novel approach to cancer immunotherapy may provide a cost-effective weapon against some of the most deadly tumors, including ovarian cancer and mesothelioma. A protein engineered by MGH investigators to combine a molecule targeting a tumor antigen with an immune-function stimuating protein prolonged survival in animal models of both tumors.

02/27/2014: High-calorie feeding may slow progression of ALS

Increasing the number of calories consumed by patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be a relatively simple way of extending their survival. A phase 2 clinical trial led by Massachusetts General Hospital physicians found that ALS patients receiving a high-calorie, high-carbohydrate tube-feeding formula lived longer with fewer adverse events than participants who received a standard formula designed maintain their weight.

02/24/2014: Specialized cognitive behavioral therapy improves blood sugar control in depressed patients with type 2 diabetes

A program of cognitive behavioral therapy that addresses both mood and diabetes self-care led to improved blood sugar control and produced faster relief of depression in patients with poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes.

02/20/2014: Survey finds rural primary care physicians as committed to professionalism, quality improvement as their urban counterparts

A new study finds few meaningful differences between rural and urban primary care physicians on key measures of professionalism, including their attitudes about participation in quality care improvement.

02/12/2014: Pregabalin effectively treats restless leg syndrome, less likely than dopamine drugs to worsen symptoms

A year-long study has found that pregabalin – FDA-approved to treat nerve pain and seizures – was effective in reducing symptoms of restless leg syndrome and, with long-term treatment, was less likely than pramipexole – which activates the dopamine neurotransmission system and is FDA approved for RLS treatment – to cause worsening of symptoms.

02/07/2014: First Huntington disease prevention trial shows treatment safety, suggests slowing of presymptomatic progression

The first clinical trial of a drug intended to delay the onset of symptoms of Huntington disease reveals that high-dose treatment with the nutritional supplement creatine was safe and well tolerated by most study participants. In addition, neuroimaging provided evidence that creatine might slow the progression of presymptomatic disease.

02/03/2014: Gene mutation defines brain tumors that benefit from aggressive surgery

A new study has found that patients with malignant astrocytoma – the most common malignant brain tumor – whose tumors carry a specific genetic mutation benefit greatly from surgical removal of the largest possible amount of tumor.

01/26/2014: Shortening guide RNA markedly improves specificity of CRISPR-Cas nucleases

MGH investigators have found that adjusting the length of the the guide RNA component of the gene-editing tools called CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases can substantially reduce the occurrence of DNA mutations at off-target sites.

01/17/2014: Mass. General researcher Gary Ruvkun a co-recipient of 2014 Wolf Prize

MGH investigator Gary Ruvkun, PhD, has been named a co-recipient of the 2014 Wolf Prize in Medicine, along with Victor Ambros, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Nahum Sonenberg, PhD of McGill University. Ruvkun and Ambros are being honored for discovering that tiny molecules of RNA control the activity of other genes that encode proteins in animals.

01/15/2014: 'Barcode' profiling enables analysis of hundreds of tumor marker proteins at once

A new technology developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Systems Biology allows simultaneous analysis of hundreds of cancer-related protein markers from miniscule patient samples gathered through minimally invasive methods.

01/15/2014: Mass. General, Broad Institute and Amgen Will Work to Discover New Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Massachusetts General Hospital, the Broad Institute, and Amgen announced today that they have launched a strategic collaboration to jointly discover and validate new therapeutic targets and develop novel therapies for inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic disorder that affects millions worldwide.

01/12/2014: MGH/Ragon Institute study identifies population of stem-like cells where HIV persists in spite of treatment

Investigators from MGH and the Ragon Institute may have found where HIV persists in the body in spite of antiviral treatment – in a small group of recently identified T cells with stem-cell-like properties.

01/12/2014: Multi-institutional team finds targetable mutation in rare brain tumor

A team led by investigators from MGH, Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Broad Institute has found that a gene mutation associated with several types of cancer also may be responsible for a rare but debilitating brain tumor called papillary craniopharyngioma.

01/09/2014: Mass. General research could expand availability of hand, face transplants

Making an important step towards greater availability of hand and face transplants, MGH investigators have shown that a procedure developed to induce immune tolerance to organ transplants can induce tolerance to a model limb transplant in miniature swine.

01/07/2014: Longer-term varenicline treatment improves tobacco abstinence for people with serious mental illness

Extended treatment with the smoking cessation drug varenicline significantly improved the ability of individuals with serious mental illness to maintain abstinence from tobacco after a standard 12-week course of treatment.

01/07/2014: Researchers discover molecule behind the benefits of exercise

While it's clear that exercise can improve health and longevity, the changes that occur in the body to facilitate these benefits are less clear. Now MGH researchers have discovered a molecule that is produced during exercise and contributes to the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolism.

01/07/2014: "Traffic light" food labels, prominent positioning of healthy items produce lasting purchase choice changes

The use of color-coded "traffic light" food labels and changes in the way popular items are displayed appear to have produced a long-term increase in the choice of more healthful food items among customers in a large hospital cafeteria.

01/06/2014: Tiny Technology Enables Improved Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

The ability to detect circulating tumor cells as they travel through the blood can play an important role in early diagnosis, characterization of cancer subtypes, treatment monitoring and metastasis.

12/23/2013: Inosine treatment safely elevates urate levels in Parkinson disease patients

A clinical trial assessing the potential of the nutritional supplement inosine to treat Parkinson disease has found that the studied dosages successfully raised participants' levels of the antioxidant urate without producing serious side effects.

12/20/2013: New genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes revealed

An international team of researchers in Mexico and the United States has uncovered a new genetic clue that contributes to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly the elevated risk among Mexican and other Latin American populations.

12/16/2013: Physicians who prefer hospice care for themselves more likely to discuss hospice with patients

Although the vast majority of physicians participating in a multiregional study indicated that they would personally enroll in hospice care if they received a terminal cancer diagnosis, less than one-third would discuss hospice care early in the course of treating a terminally ill cancer patient.

12/13/2013: Differences in plaque composition, immune activation may explain elevated cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected women

An MGH research team has discovered a possible mechanism behind the elevated risk of cardiovascular disease in women infected with HIV, a risk even higher than that of HIV-infected men.

12/11/2013: Boston Hospital Trio Awarded $25 Million NIH Grant to Study Critical Limb Ischemia

A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Medical Center and MGH has been awarded $25 million by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a clinical trial comparing traditional bypass surgery with a less invasive treatment alternative for patients with critical limb ischemia.

12/11/2013: Brief laser-light treatment may significantly improve effectiveness of influenza vaccines

Pretreating the site of intradermal vaccination – vaccine delivered into the skin rather than to muscles beneath the skin – with a particular wavelength of laser light may substantially improve vaccine effectiveness without the adverse effects of chemical additives currently used to boost vaccine efficacy.

12/06/2013: Clinical waste may prove valuable for monitoring treatment response in ovarian cancer

MGH investigators have developed a microchip-based device that can isolate and identify tumor cells found in ascites – an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen that often occurs in abdominal cancers – potentially simplifying the monitoring of treatment response in ovarian cancer and other malignancies.

12/04/2013: Study Highlights Massive Benefits of HIV Treatment in South Africa

Antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection has saved 2.8 million years of life in South Africa since 2004 and is projected to save an additional 15.1 million years of life by 2030, according to a new study published online in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

11/28/2013: Researchers find a missing component in effort to create primitive, synthetic cells

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators working to create "protocells" – primitive synthetic cells consisting of a nucleic acid strand encased within a membrane-bound compartment – have accomplished an important step towards their goal, finding a solution to the potential incompatibility between a chemical requirement of RNA copying and the stability of the protocell membrane.

11/24/2013: Study identifies protein essential for innate immune recognition, response to viral infection

An MGH-led research team has identified an immune cell protein that is critical to setting off the body's initial response against viral infection. The report describes finding that a protein called GEF-H1 is essential to the ability of macrophages – major contributors to the innate immune system – to respond to viral infections like influenza.

11/22/2013: Mass General study analyzes unicycle injuries in the United States.

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has identified, for the first time, the types of injuries incurred in unicycle accidents in the United States.

11/20/2013: Current practice may over-diagnose vitamin D deficiency

The current "gold standard" test for measuring vitamin D status may not accurately diagnose vitamin D deficiency in black individuals.

11/20/2013: Study reveals how variant forms of APOE protein impact risk of Alzheimer's disease

A study led by MGH investigators shows that even low levels of the Alzheimer's-associated APOE4 protein can increase toxic amyloid beta brain plaques and the characteristic neuronal damage in mouse models of the disease. Introducing APOE2, a rare, potentially protective variant, reduced amyloid deposits and associated damage.

11/20/2013: Tiny antisense molecules increase 'good cholesterol' levels in obese primates

A strategy developed by MGH-based investigators to increase levels of beneficial high-density lipoprotein has been shown for the first time to be effective in non-human primates.

11/19/2013: Gift supports MGH drug development, patient and family support for rare and deadly tumor

New program to create a more hopeful and supportive future for patients with the rare cancer mesothelioma.

11/19/2013: Age Affects Short-term Quality of Life After Breast Biopsy

Breast biopsies can adversely affect short-term quality-of-life, and the effects are more pronounced in younger patients, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

11/19/2013: Study Finds Altered Brain Connections in Epilepsy Patients

Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

11/15/2013: Blocking signal-transmitting cellular pores may prevent kidney damage from diabetes, other conditions

A group of MGH investigators has identified a molecule that plays a key role in the breakdown of the kidney filter, presenting a potential therapeutic target for stopping the type of kidney damage associated with diabetes before it becomes irreversible.

11/14/2013: Mass. General study identifies genes uniquely expressed by the brain's immune cells

MGH investigators have identified a group of genes used by the brain's immune cells – called microglia – to sense pathogenics, toxins or damaged cells that require their response. Identifying these genes should lead to better understanding of the role of microglia in normal brains and in neurodegenerative disorders.

11/08/2013: Repurposed drug may be first targeted treatment for serious kidney disease

A drug approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may also turn out to be the first targeted therapy for one of the most common forms of kidney disease, a condition that almost inevitably leads to kidney failure.

11/06/2013: Postoperative pain may increase risk of temporary problems with learning, memory

The pain caused by a surgical incision may contribute to the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, a sometimes transient impairment in learning and memory that affects a small but significant number of patients in the days following a surgical procedure.

11/06/2013: Postoperative pain may increase risk of temporary problems with learning, memory

The pain caused by a surgical incision may contribute to the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, a sometimes transient impairment in learning and memory that affects a small but significant number of patients in the days following a surgical procedure.

11/05/2013: Pleasure and pain brain signals disrupted in fibromyalgia patients

New research indicates that a disruption of brain signals for reward and punishment contributes to increased pain sensitivity, known as hyperalgesia, in fibromyalgia patients.

11/04/2013: Imaging studies may predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic drugs

Advanced imaging techniques may be able to distinguish which patients' tumors will respond to treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs and which will not.

10/31/2013: Automated system promises precise control of medically induced coma

Putting patients with severe head injuries in induced comas requires constant monitoring of brain activity and manual adjustment of drug dosage. Now a computer-controlled system promises to automate the process, making it more precise and efficient and opening the door to more advanced control of anesthesia.

10/31/2013: Legal Initiative For Children (LINC) celebrates 10 years at MGH

Many immigrant and refugee families come to Chelsea from poor countries torn by civil war. They are war-weary and wary of authority figures. Many do not know that they have the right to complain about unsanitary rental apartments and the right to appeal from denial of public benefits. Thanks to a medical-legal partnership funded by the MGH Center for Community Health Improvement, these families can get help exercising those rights.

10/30/2013: Early HIV antiviral treatment found to be cost-effective in South Africa, India

"Treatment as prevention" – early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals with uninfected sexual partners to prevent viral transmission – appears to make economic sense, along with meeting its clinical goals of helping infected patients stay healthy and reducing transmission.

10/29/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital researchers identify identify biomarker to predict diabetes risk

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care and Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute have found a chemical biomarker in blood that can predict diabetes risk more than a decade before the onset of the disease.

10/24/2013: Genetic analysis reveals novel insights into the genetic architecture of obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome

An international research consortium led by investigators at MGH and the University of Chicago has answered several questions about the genetic background of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome, providing the first direct confirmation that both are highly heritable and also revealing major differences between the underlying genetic makeup of the disorders.

10/22/2013: Hydrogel implant enables light-based communication with cells inside the body

As researchers develop novel therapies based on inducing specific cells to do specific things, getting the right message to the right group of cells at the right time remains a major challenge. Now researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at MGH have developed a way to deliver a light signal to specific tissues deep within the body.

10/17/2013: "Traffic-light" labeling increases customer's attention to nutritional quality of their food choices

A simple, color-coded system for labeling food items in a hospital cafeteria appears to have increased customer's attention to the healthiness of their food choices, along with encouraging purchases of the most healthy items.

10/08/2013: Combination of anemia and high altitudes significantly increases risk of poor outcomes in children with pneumonia

Pneumonia is the leading cause of death of young children around the world, and a new study now finds that the risk of poor outcomes – including persistent pneumonia, secondary infections, organ failure or death – in children who contract pneumonia is four times higher in those who also have anemia and live at high altitudes.

10/07/2013: Incentive program helps Mass. General's physicians organization reach quality-improvement goals

A program offering modest financial incentives to salaried Massachusetts General Hospital-affiliated physicians who achieve specific quality improvement targets has helped the organization meet goals related to the adoption of electronic health technology, improved quality and efficiency, and communication with patients and other providers.

10/02/2013: Does a High Statin Dose Reduce Periodontal Inflammation?

New data showing that high-dose atorvastatin can reduce periodontal inflammation in as little as four weeks suggests a new mechanism of action for statins.

10/01/2013: Blood-pressure drug may help improve cancer treatment

Use of existing, well-established hypertension drugs could improve the outcome of cancer chemotherapy by opening up collapsed blood vessels in solid tumors.

09/25/2013: How difficult are diagnostic and screening tests for patients?

Medical tests with greater morbidity are less likely to be completed by patients, and this lack of health maintenance adherence has implications for future health outcomes.

09/24/2013: Study confirms that rare mutations increase risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

MGH researchers have identified and validated two rare gene mutations that appear to cause the common form of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that strikes after the age of 60. The two mutations occur in a gene called ADAM10, which now becomes the second pathologically-confirmed gene for late-onset AD and the fifth AD gene overall.

09/23/2013: CDC, Mass. General study reveals that preventing malaria in travelers to West Africa reduces health costs

Not only do U.S. travelers to West Africa who consult health providers before they leave and take prescribed preventive medications substantially reduce their risk of contracting malaria, they also reduce costs to their health insurance providers and, in most cases, to themselves.

09/21/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital Receives the Extracorproeal Life Support Organization Award for Excellence in Life Support

Massachusetts General Hospital has been designated as a Center of Excellence by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO), an international consortium of health care professionals and scientists who are dedicated to the development and evaluation of novel therapies for support of failing organ systems.

09/18/2013: Study shows colonoscopy better than sigmoidoscopy in protecting against colorectal cancer

A new study finds that colonoscopy appears to reduce the risk of developing or dying from colorectal cancer more powerfully than does sigmoidoscopy, a similar procedure that examines only a portion of the colon. The investigation also identifies molecular features that may help explain tumors that are diagnosed despite an individual's having recently undergone colonoscopy.

09/18/2013: Appalachian Mountain Club and MGHfC Team Up to Help Families Live a Healthier Lifestyle

The Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) and MassGeneral Hospital for Children have joined forces to launch “Outdoors Rx,” an innovative new AMC program that gives healthcare professionals the dedicated resources for prescribing regular outdoor physical activity to children.

09/16/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital offers specialized operation to remove chronic blood clots from pulmonary arteries

Massachusetts General Hospital offers pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE), a highly specialized operation to remove chronic blood clots in the lungs. Without surgery, patients who have this life-threatening disease will likely develop progressive shortness of breath so severe that it leads to heart failure.

09/11/2013: Testosterone deficiency not the only cause of age-associated changes in men

A study by MGH researchers finds that some of the symptoms often seen in middle-aged men – changes in body composition, energy, strength and sexual function – are caused not only by decreases in testosterone production but also by reduced levels of estrogen.

09/11/2013: Gene-expression-based biomarker predicts long-term risk of breast cancer recurrence

A comparison of three methods of predicting recurrence risk in women treated for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer finds that only the breast cancer index – a biomarker based on the expression levels of seven tumor-specific genes – accurately identifies patients who continue to be at risk after five years of estrogen-blocking treatment.

09/10/2013: Improved adherence to preventive antiretroviral therapy may reduce transmission of HIV

A recently completed substudy of a larger clinical trial found that pre-exposure prophylaxis – a new strategy to prevent HIV infection by prescribing a daily antiretroviral drug to at-risk individuals – can be a powerful tool when participants take their medications.

09/09/2013: In-home intervention improves routines that reduce risk of childhood obesity

A new study appearing in JAMA Pediatrics describes how a home-based program that helped at-risk families improve household routines was able to slow weight gain in a group of young children.

08/29/2013: Assay shown to be effective in measuring levels of mutant huntingtin protein

An assay designed to measure normal and abnormal forms of the huntingtin protein – the mutated form of which causes Huntington's disease – was successful in detecting levels of the mutant protein in a large multicenter study of individuals at risk for the devastating neurological disorder.

08/21/2013: Use of tPA for ischemic stroke nearly doubled from 2003 to 2011

Use of the "clot-busting" drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to treat patients with strokes caused by a blockage of blood flow nearly doubled between 2003 and 2011, but not all eligible patients are receiving the potentially life-saving therapy.

08/18/2013: New MR analysis technique reveals brain tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy

A new way of analyzing data acquired in MR imaging appears to be able to identify whether or not tumors are responding to anti-angiogenesis therapy, information that can help physicians determine the most appropriate treatments and discontinue ones that are ineffective.

08/11/2013: Macrophage proliferation appears to drive progression of atherosclerosis

New insights into the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques could lead to better treatment or prevention of heart attacks and strokes.

08/02/2013: FDA Sets New Food Safety Regulations for Gluten-Free Foods

The FDA has released its definition of "gluten free" to be used by food manufacturers. The long-awaited regulations stem from research conducted by the Center for Celiac Research.

07/30/2013: Study finds evidence of nerve damage in around half of fibromyalgia patients

About half of a small group of patients with fibromyalgia – a common syndrome that causes chronic pain and other symptoms – was found to have damage to nerve fibers in their skin and other evidence of a disease called small-fiber polyneuropathy, a disorder that sometimes can be treated.

07/29/2013: Playing college football linked with high blood pressure risk

College football players, especially linemen, may develop high blood pressure over the course of their first season, according to a small study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

07/23/2013: Digital PCR technology detects brain-tumor-associated mutation in cerebrospinal fluid

MGH researchers and their colleagues have used digital versions of a standard molecular biology tool to detect a common tumor-associated mutation in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain tumors.

07/15/2013: Researchers generate long-lasting blood vessels from reprogrammed human cells

MGH researchers have used vascular precursor cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells to generate, in an animal model, functional blood vessels that lasted as long as nine months.

07/03/2013: Genetic signals reflect the evolutionary impact of cholera

An international research team has used a novel approach to identify genetic factors that appear to influence susceptibility to cholera. The findings indicate the importance of pathways involved in regulating water loss in intestinal cells and of the innate immune system in the body's response to the bacteria that causes cholera.

07/01/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital combines two minimally invasive procedures to treat atrial fibrillation

A new clinical trial is now underway at the Massachusetts General Hospital to investigate whether combining two endovascular catheter-based procedures will improve the long-term outcome in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. Mass General is the first hospital in New England – and only the second in the nation – to pair renal artery sympathetic denervation with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension.

07/01/2013: Lack of immune cell receptor impairs clearance of amyloid beta protein from the brain

Identification of a protein that appears to play an important role in the immune system's removal of amyloid beta protein from the brain could lead to a new treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

06/28/2013: Biomarker predicts risk of breast cancer recurrence after tamoxifen treatment

A biomarker reflecting expression levels of two genes in tumor tissue may be able to predict which women treated for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer should receive a second estrogen-blocking medication after completing tamoxifen treatment.

06/24/2013: Pediatric practices can offer smoking cessation assistance to parents of their patients

Finally some good news for parents who smoke: you may now be able to get help quitting from an unlikely source, your child’s doctor. A study in the journal Pediatrics, which has been posted online, shows that it is feasible for pediatric practices to incorporate into their normal routine efforts to inform patients' parents about services available to help them quit smoking.

06/23/2013: Powerful gene-editing tool appears to cause off-target mutations in human cells

MGH researchers have found a significant limitation to the use of a new gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas RGNs, production of unwanted DNA mutations at sites other than the desired target. Their findings indicate the need to improve the precision of the technology.

06/20/2013: Mass. General Center Joins JDRF Consortium Following Groundbreaking Diabetes Research

The Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (VIC), has joined with 24 other institutions as part of the first-ever JDRF Encapsulation Consortium in the fight against type 1 diabetes

06/19/2013: Restoring appropriate movement to immune cells may save lives of patients with serious burns

A device that measures the movement of key immune cells, developed by MGH investigators, may help determine which patients with serious burns are at risk for septic complications, and a novel treatment that directly addresses the cause of those complications could prevent many associated deaths.

06/17/2013: Rare genomic mutations found in 10 families with early-onset, familial Alzheimer's disease

MGH researchers have discovered a type of mutation known as copy-number variants – deletions, duplications, or rearrangements of human genomic DNA – in affected members of 10 families with early-onset Alzheimer's. These are the first new early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease gene mutations to be reported since 1995.

06/17/2013: Study finds significant racial and ethnic disparities in usage of specialty services for children with autism

A study from investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children found that African-American or Hispanic children diagnosed with autism were significantly less likely than white children to have received subspecialty care or procedures related to conditions that often accompany autism spectrum disorders.

06/03/2013: MGH-led studies shed new light on targeted lung cancer therapy

Research teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center investigators are publishing two important studies regarding use of the targeted cancer drug crizotinib for treatment of advanced lung cancer driven by specific genetic mutations.

06/03/2013: Early-life risk factors account for racial and ethnic disparities in childhood obesity

A research team reports in JAMA Pediatrics that the known prevalence of obesity and overweight among black and Hispanic children can largely be explained by risk factors such as rapid infant weight gain, early introduction of solid foods and a lack of exclusive breast feeding.

05/22/2013: Survey points out deficiencies in addictions training for medical residents

A 2012 survey of internal medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital found that more than half rated the training they had received in addiction and other substance use disorders as fair or poor. In response to the findings the MGH has increased residents' training in addiction medicine.

05/20/2013: Genetic diversity within tumors predicts outcome in head and neck cancer

A new measure of the heterogeneity – the variety of genetic mutations – of cells within a tumor appears to predict treatment outcomes of patients with the most common type of head and neck cancer.

05/16/2013: Women with Chronic Physical Disabilities Are No Less Likely to Bear Children

A new study finds that women with chronic physical disabilities are about as likely as nondisabled women to say they are currently pregnant, after age and other sociodemographic factors are taken into account.

05/15/2013: Study finds disagreement on the role of primary care nurse practitioners

A New England Journal of Medicine study finds that, while primary care physicians and nurse practitioners agree that nurse practitioners "should be able to practice to the full extent of their education and training," they significantly disagree about some proposed changes to the scope of nurse practitioners' responsibilities.

05/14/2013: Treatment with two osteoporosis drugs better at increasing bone density than single-drug therapy

A combination of two FDA-approved osteoporosis drugs with different mechanisms of action was found to increase bone density better than treatment with either drug alone in a small clinical trial.

05/13/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital Receives Highest Nursing Credential With Prestigious Magnet® Recognition … Again

The Massachusetts General Hospital has again attained Magnet® recognition as part of the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. This voluntary credentialing program for hospitals recognizes excellence in nursing. This credential is the highest honor an organization can receive for professional nursing practice.

05/08/2013: Mass. General, Duke study identifies two genes that combine to cause rare syndrome

Researchers from MGH and Duke University have identified genetic mutations that appear to underlie a rare but devastating syndrome combining reproductive failure with cerebellar ataxia – a lack of muscle coordination – and dementia.

05/05/2013: Portable device provides rapid, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis, other bacterial infections

A handheld diagnostic device that MGH investigators first developed to diagnose cancer has been adapted to rapidly diagnose tuberculosis and other important infectious bacteria.

05/02/2013: Gene variant appears to predict weight loss after gastric bypass

MGH researchers have identified a gene variant that helps predict how much weight an individual will lose after gastric bypass surgery, a finding with the potential both to guide treatment planning and to facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches to treating obesity and related conditions like diabetes.

05/01/2013: Study identifies genes, pathways altered during relaxation response practice

A new study from investigators at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind/Body Medicine at MGH and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center finds that elicitation of the relaxation response produces immediate changes in the expression of genes involved in immune function, energy metabolism and insulin secretion.

04/25/2013: Alzheimer's risk gene presents potential treatment target

MGH investigators have determined that one of the recently identified genes contributing to the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease regulates the clearance of the toxic amyloid beta (A-beta) protein that accumulates in the brains of patients with the disease.

04/18/2013: Three Mass. General researchers among recipients of Top 10 Clinical Research Achievement awards

Three projects led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have been named among the Clinical Research Forum's Top 10 Clinical Research Achievements of 2012.

04/15/2013: Gene-expression signature may signify risk for recurrence, metastasis in prostate cancer

A team led by MGH researchers has identified a genetic signature that may reflect the risk of tumor recurrence or spread in men surgically treated for prostate cancer. If confirmed, the genetic risk index also may help distinguish tumors that require aggressive treatment from those that can safely be monitored.

04/14/2013: Mass. General team develops implantable, bioengineered rat kidney

Bioengineered rat kidneys developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators successfully produced urine both in a laboratory apparatus and after being transplanted into living animals.

04/12/2013: Mass. General Neurological Clinical Research Institute and Prize4Life receive Bio-IT World Award for creation of ALS data platform

The MGH Neurological Clinical Research Institute and Prize4Life, an organization dedicated to accelerating discovery of treatments and a cure for ALS, received a Best Practices Award at the 2013 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo for their creation of PRO-ACT ,the largest database of information from ALS clinical trials and patient care.

04/09/2013: Google searches about mental illness follow seasonal patterns

A new study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that Google searches for information across all major mental illnesses and problems followed seasonal patterns, suggesting mental illness may be more strongly linked with seasonal patterns than previously thought.

04/08/2013: Adding intestinal enzyme to diets of mice appears to prevent, treat metabolic syndrome

Feeding an intestinal enzyme to mice kept on a high-fat diet appears to prevent the development of metabolic syndrome – a group of symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and fatty liver – and to reduce symptoms in mice that already had the condition.

04/07/2013: Next-generation PI3 Kinase Inhibitor Demonstrated Early Efficacy, Safety

GDC-0032, a potent, next-generation PI3 kinase inhibitor, demonstrated early signs of efficacy for patients with cancers driven by mutations in the PI3 kinase alpha gene, according to first in-human results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013.

04/03/2013: Third-generation device significantly improves capture of circulating tumor cells

A new system for isolating rare circulating tumor cells – living solid tumor cells found at low levels in the bloodstream – shows significant improvement over previously developed devices and does not require prior identification of tumor-specific target molecules.

04/03/2013: Phase 1 ALS trial is first to test antisense treatment of neurodegenerative disease

The initial clinical trial of a novel approach to treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – blocking production of a mutant protein that causes an inherited form of the progressive neurodegenerative disease – may be a first step towards a new era in the treatment of such disorders.

03/27/2013: Changes in gastrointestinal microbes may produce some benefits of gastric bypass

Changes in the microbial population of the gastrointestinal tract may underlie some of the benefits of gastric bypass surgery, reports a team of researchers from MGH and Harvard University. The investigators also found that post-bypass alterations in the microbial population of mice can induce weight loss in animals that did not have surgery.

03/20/2013: Mass General receives top honor for stroke patients’ quality of care

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has received a top honor from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) for its commitment to improving its quality of care to stroke patients. The “2013 Stroke Collaborative Reaching for Excellence (SCORE) Defect-Free Care Award” recognizes the MGH for providing defect-free care to more than 80 percent of patients admitted with stroke over the course of a year

03/12/2013: Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits

An analysis of data from the Framingham Offspring Study confirms that the health benefits of quitting smoking far exceed any negative effects of weight gained after smoking cessation

03/11/2013: Nerve damage may underlie widespread, unexplained chronic pain in children

Study finds that most of a group of young patients seen at Mass General for chronic, unexplained pain had test results indicating small-fiber polyneuropathy, a condition not previously reported in children.

03/08/2013: BRAF inhibitor treatment causes melanoma cells to shift how they produce energy

A multi-institutional study has revealed that BRAF-positive metastatic malignant melanomas develop resistance to treatment with drugs targeting the BRAF/MEK growth pathway through a major change in metabolism. The findings suggest a strategy to improve the effectiveness of currently available targeted therapies.

03/06/2013: Folate and vitamin B12 supplementation reduces disabling schizophrenia symptoms in patients with specific gene variants

Adding the dietary supplements folate and vitamin B12 to treatment with antipsychotic medication improved a core symptom component of schizophrenia in a study of more than 100 patients.

03/05/2013: EEG patterns indicate when patients lose, regain consciousness under propofol anesthesia

MGH investigators have identified specific EEG signatures that indicate when patients lose and regain consciousness under the general anesthetic drug propofol. The findings should lead to better ways of monitoring awareness and tracking other aspects of the brain states of patients under anesthesia.

02/28/2013: Study identifies growth factor essential to the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor

A multi-institutional team led by MGH researchers has identified a molecular pathway that appears to be essential for the growth and spread of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children.

02/25/2013: Extremely high estrogen levels may underlie serious complications affecting single-birth IVF pregnancies

MGH researchers have identified what may be a major factor behind the increased risk of two adverse outcomes in IVF pregnancies – extremely high estrogen levels at the time of embryo transfer. They describe a protocol that reduced the risk of infants born small for their gestational age and the risk of preeclampsia in a small group of patients.

02/13/2013: Probiotic-Derived Treatment Offers New Hope for Premature Babies

Chemicals secreted by "good" bacteria that typically live in the intestines of babies could reduce the frequency and severity of a common and often-lethal disease of premature infants.

02/13/2013: Cellular renewal process may underlie benefits of omega fatty acids

A search for genes that change their levels of expression in response to starvation has uncovered potential clues to the mechanism behind the health benefits of omega fatty acids. MGH researchers report that omega-6 fatty acids may activate a cellular renewal process called autophagy, which may be deficient in several important diseases of aging.

02/11/2013: Mouse models fail to reproduce inflammatory genomic response to serious injuries

Existing mouse models do not appear to accurately reproduce the human genomic response to serious traumatic injury, including major burns.

02/06/2013: Brain research provides clues to what makes people think and behave differently

Differences in the physical connections of the brain are at the root of what make people think and behave differently from one another. Researchers reporting in the February 6 issue of Neuron shed new light on the details of this phenomenon, mapping the exact brain regions where individual differences occur.

02/05/2013: Benefits of CT Outweigh Cancer Risks in Young Adults

The underlying medical conditions facing young adults who undergo computed tomography (CT) exams represent a significantly greater health risk than that of radiation-induced cancer from CT.

02/05/2013: European restrictions on working hours have 'profound' effect on medical care and education

In the February 6 issue of JAMA, investigators from MGH and Harvard Medical School describe what is known about the impact on medical care and resident training of the European Working Time Directive and its implications for postgraduate medical education in the U.S.

01/31/2013: Transition in cell type parallels treatment response, disease progression in breast cancer

A process that normally occurs in developing embryos – the changing of one basic cell type into another – has also been suspected of playing a role in cancer metastasis. Now a study from MGH Cancer Center researchers has associated this process, called epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with disease progression and treatment response in breast cancer patients.

01/29/2013: Physicians' brain scans indicate that doctors can feel their patients' pain – and their pain relief

In a novel investigation in which physicians underwent brain scans while they believed they were actually treating patients, researchers have provided the first scientific evidence indicating that doctors truly can feel their patients’ pain – and can also experience their relief following treatment.

01/29/2013: Mass. General study clarifies antidepressant contribution to arrhythmia risk

An analysis of the medical records of more than 38,000 patients by MGH investigators clarifies the contribution of citalopram and other antidepressants to lengthening of the QT interval, an aspect of the heart's electrical activity that – when prolonged – may increase the risk of dangerous arrhythmias.

01/24/2013: Center for Celiac Research Joins MassGeneral Hospital for Children

The Center for Celiac Research, under the leadership of Alessio Fasano, MD, has moved from Baltimore to Massachusetts General Hospital for Children (MGHfC) in Boston.

01/24/2013: Neuroinflammation may be behind general-anesthesia-associated learning disabilities

Two studies in mice suggest that several factors may combine to induce impairments in learning and memory, accompanied by the inflammation of brain tissue, in young mammals receiving general anesthesia and that the offspring of animals that received general anesthesia during pregnancy may show the same effects.

01/23/2013: New imaging method facilitates research into cystic fibrosis and other pulmonary diseases

Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and MGH have developed a new imaging method that promises to provide fast, accurate images of the human airway to enhance research into new treatments and medications for diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

01/15/2013: Advanced Airway Procedures for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Associated With Poorer Neurological Outcomes

In patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation with advanced airway management was a significant predictor of poor neurological outcome compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation.

01/14/2013: Drug overdose now the leading cause of death among homeless adults in Boston

Investigators from MGH and the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program compared rates and causes of death among those served by BHCHP between 2003 to 2008 with data from a 1997 study and found that, while drug overdose had replaced HIV as the leading cause of death, overall mortality rates had not changed.

01/14/2013: Generic HIV treatment strategy could save nearly $1 billion annually but may be less effective

Replacing the combination of brand-name, antiretroviral drugs currently recommended for control of HIV infection with soon-to-be-available generic medications could save the U.S. health care system almost $1 billion a year but may diminish the effectiveness of HIV treatment.

01/14/2013: Impaired coordination of brain activity in autism involves local, as well as long-range, signaling

A new study finds that local functional connectivity of the brain – the extent to which activity within a small brain region appears to be coordinated – is reduced in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. It had been believed that local connectivity was increased in the brains of autistic individuals while long-range connectivity was reduced.

01/13/2013: Pill-sized device provides rapid, detailed imaging of esophageal lining

Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an imaging system enclosed in a capsule about the size of a multivitamin pill that creates detailed, microscopic images of the esophageal wall.

01/07/2013: Looming Malpractice

The length of time it takes to resolve a malpractice claim places stress on patients, physicians and the legal system. The time spent with open claims may be even more distressing for physicians than the financial costs of the claims.

01/07/2013: Many physicians often fulfill patient requests for brand-name drugs instead of equivalent generics

More than a third of U.S. physicians responding to a national survey indicated they often or sometimes prescribed brand-name drugs when appropriate generic substitutes were available simply because patients requested the brand-name drug. Respondents who had marketing relationships with industry were more likely to fulfill such requests.

12/18/2012: Immediate Health Risk Must Be Weighed Against Radiation-Induced Cancer Risk

The lifetime risks of cancer from medical radiation may be overemphasized relative to more immediate health risks, according to a new study.

12/17/2012: Genetic manipulation of urate alters neurodegeneration in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

A study by MGH researchers adds further support to the possibility that increasing levels of urate may protect against Parkinson's disease. The investigators report that mice with a genetic mutation increasing urate levels were protected against Parkinson's-like neurodegeneration, while the damage was worse in animals with abnormally low urate.

12/13/2012: Intestinal immune cells play an unexpected role in immune surveillance of the bloodstream

A type of immune cell found in the small intestine plays a previously unsuspected role in monitoring antigens circulating in the bloodstream. Disruption of the newly discovered regulatory system may lead to the development of autoimmune disorders, inflammatory bowel disease or food allergies.

12/10/2012: Educational video helps terminal cancer patients decide whether to receive CPR

Patients with terminal cancer who viewed a brief video demonstrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were less likely than patients who only listened to a verbal description of the procedure to indicate a preference for receiving CPR in the event of an in-hospital cardiac arrest.

12/06/2012: Combining two genome analysis approaches supports immune system contribution to autism

Researchers using novel approaches and methodologies of identifying genes that contribute to the development of autism have found evidence that disturbances in several immune-system-related pathways contribute to development of autism spectrum disorders.

12/06/2012: Protein controlling glucose metabolism also a tumor suppressor

A protein known to regulate how cells process glucose also appears to be a tumor suppressor, adding to the potential that therapies directed at cellular metabolism may help suppress tumor growth.

12/05/2012: Women and men appear to benefit in different ways from AA participation

A new study finds differences in how participation in Alcoholics Anonymous helps men and women maintain sobriety. For men, avoiding companions and situations that encourage drinking had more powerful effects, while increased confidence in the ability to avoid drinking in response to feelings of sadness or depression was more important for women.

11/29/2012: Defining career paths in health systems improvement

Training the next generation of experts dedicated to improving the quality of the U.S. health care system will require a new framework for career development, according to three physicians writing in the January 2013 issue of Academic Medicine.

11/29/2012: Enzyme inhibition protects against Huntington's disease damage in two animal models

Treatment with a novel agent that inhibits the activity of SIRT2, an enzyme that regulates many important cellular functions, reduced neurological damage, slowed the loss of motor function and extended survival in two animal models of Huntington's disease.

11/28/2012: Men with Belly Fat at Risk for Osteoporosis

Visceral, or deep belly, obesity is a risk factor for bone loss and decreased bone strength in men, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

11/26/2012: Newly insured patients may have trouble finding primary care physicians

A study by MGH researchers finds that many of the primary care physicians likely to be asked to care for patients newly insured under the Affordable Care Act may be not be accepting new patients. Strategies designed to increase and support these "safety-net" physicians could help ensure that newly covered patients have access to primary care.

11/20/2012: Novel Breast Screening Technology Increases Diagnostic Accuracy

The addition of three-dimensional breast imaging—a technology called tomosynthesis—to standard digital mammography significantly increases radiologists' diagnostic accuracy while reducing false positive recall rates, according to the results of a multi-center study.

11/19/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches Online National Emergency Room Locator

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) announced the launch of EDMaps.org, a national emergency room locator which provides the most accurate and up-to-date information on emergency departments in the United States.

11/13/2012: Glutamate neurotransmission system may be involved with depression risk

Researchers using a new approach to identifying genes associated with depression have found that variants in a group of genes involved in transmission of signals by the neurotransmitter glutamate appear to increase the risk of depression.

11/12/2012: Smoking parents often expose children to tobacco smoke in their cars

MassGeneral Hospital for Children study suggests that parents may not recognize the dangers of smoking in their cars with a child present.

11/12/2012: Meditation appears to produce enduring changes in emotional processing in the brain

A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. The researchers also found differences in those effects based on the specific type of meditation practiced.

11/11/2012: Detection, analysis of 'cell dust' may allow diagnosis, monitoring of brain cancer

A novel miniature diagnostic platform using nuclear magnetic resonance technology is capable of detecting minuscule cell particles known as microvesicles in a drop of blood. Detecting microvesicles shed by cancer cells could prove a simple means for diagnosing cancer or monitoring treatment response.

11/05/2012: MGH/MIT study discovers how brain activity changes when anesthesia induces unconsciousness

Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have identified for the first time a pattern of brain activity that appears to signal exactly when patients lose consciousness under general anesthesia.

11/05/2012: Study examines smoking by inpatients during hospital stay

A study of smokers admitted to a large urban teaching hospital in Massachusetts found that 18.4 percent reported smoking during their hospitalization.

11/01/2012: Combining antiangiogenesis and anti-HER2 drugs may improve survival of breast cancer patients with brain metastases

Adding an angiogenesis inhibitor to treatment with a HER2-inhibiting drug could improve outcomes for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who develop brain metastases.

10/31/2012: Unexpected factor contributes to melanoma risk in red-haired, fair-skinned individuals

The elevated risk of melanoma among people with red hair and fair skin may be caused by more than just a lack of natural protection against ultraviolet radiation. Resarchers at the MGH Cutaneous Biology Research Center and Cancer Center have found that the type of skin pigment predominantly found in red-haired, fair-skinned individuals may itself contribute to the development of melanoma.

10/31/2012: New genetic links for inflammatory bowel disease uncovered

A study by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and dozens of other organizations identifies new genes associated with inflammatory bowel disease, many appear to be associated with the immune response against both pathogenic and harmless microbes.

10/28/2012: Prostate cancer patients report better quality of life in early follow-up after proton beam radiation therapy versus two other common modalities

Patients undergoing treatment for prostate cancer using proton beam therapy reported a higher quality of life in early follow-up with similar QOL scores at two years compared to two other forms of radiation therapy.

10/23/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches Angelman Syndrome Clinic

The Angelman Syndrome Clinic, one of only two in the country, will work to reduce the frequency and severity of Angelman syndrome symptoms, particularly seizures, and to develop dietary regimens for individuals that further assist in the reduction of symptoms.

10/18/2012: $5.4 Million Awarded for Research to Guide Alzheimer's Drug Development

Understanding who is most susceptible to Alzheimer's disease and developing early detection models, effective therapies and possibly a cure, is the goal of the largest single private scientific grant ever invested in Alzheimer's Whole Genome Sequencing focused on families afflicted with the disease.

10/16/2012: Many options available to help smokers kick the habit

Smokers today have many options to help them quit, and those who think they have "tried it all" usually have not.

10/16/2012: Drugs used to immobilize patients during surgery raise risk of respiratory complications

MGH researchers have found that medications currently used to immobilize patients during surgery can increase the risk of postoperative respiratory complications.

10/10/2012: Criteria used to diagnose sports head injuries found to be inconsistent

A study of sports programs at three major universities finds that the way the injury commonly called concussion is usually diagnosed – largely based on athletes' subjective symptoms – varies greatly and may not be the best way to determine who is at risk for future problems.

10/01/2012: Study questions association between common heartburn drugs and risk of pneumonia

Studies associating the use of popular anti-heartburn medications with an increased incidence of pneumonia may not have found a true cause-and-effect relationship. A new report also outlines a strategy for determining when the results of such observational studies may have been distorted by unmeasured factors.

09/30/2012: Phase III trial shows crizotinib superior to single-agent chemotherapy for ALK-positive lung cancer

The results of a new phase III trial show that crizotinib, a targeted therapy, is a more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy for patients with advanced, ALK-positive lung cancer.

09/29/2012: Combination of targeted treatment drugs delays resistance in melanoma patients

Combined treatment with two drugs targeting different points in the same growth-factor pathway delayed the development of treatment resistance in patients with BRAF-positive metastatic malignant melanoma.

09/26/2012: Inadequate cellular rest may explain effects of aging on muscles

Is aging inevitable? What factors make older tissues less able to maintain and repair themselves? A new study from MGH investigators and collaborators at King's College London describes how muscle repair is impaired during aging and a strategy that may rejuvenate aging tissue by manipulating the environment of muscle stem cells.

09/20/2012: Taming physical forces that block cancer treatment

An MGH research team has identified factors that contribute to solid stress within tumors, suggesting possible ways to alleviate it, and has developed a simple way to measure such pressures.

09/13/2012: Puberty Turned on by Brain during Deep Sleep

Slow-wave sleep, or ‘deep sleep’, is intimately involved in the complex control of the onset of puberty, according to a recent stud.

09/10/2012: Study Shows That Placebo Response Occurs at Nonconscious Level

With the discovery that the unconscious mind plays a key role in the placebo effect, researchers have identified a novel mechanism that helps explain the power of placebos and nocebos.

09/10/2012: More pregnant women taking high blood pressure drugs, yet safety unclear

Nearly 5 percent of pregnant women are prescribed drugs to treat high blood pressure, including some drugs that aren’t considered safe for mothers or their babies.

08/30/2012: Kidney stenting lowers blood pressure in patients with severe hypertension

Patients with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension saw a significant improvement in their blood pressure with renal artery stent deployment.

08/30/2012: State tax incentives do not appear to increase the rate of living organ donation

The policies that several states have adopted giving tax deductions or credits to living organ donors do not appear to have increased donation rates, finds a study in the August issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

08/20/2012: Vitamin D supplementation can decrease risk of respiratory infections in children

A study conducted in Mongolian schoolchildren, all of whom had low blood levels of vitamin D at the start of the study, found that vitamin D supplementation cut the risk of respiratory infections in half.

08/14/2012: First genome-wide association studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome published

Two papers that will appear in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, both receiving advance online release, may help identify gene variants that contribute to the risks of developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or Tourette syndrome.

08/08/2012: Clinical trial results support strategy for reversing type 1 diabetes

A phase I clinical trial has confirmed that use of a generic vaccine to raise levels of an immune system modulator can cause the death of autoimmune cells targeting the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas and temporarily restore insulin secretion in human patients with type 1 diabetes.

08/07/2012: Color-coded labels improve healthy food choices in employees from all backgrounds

A program designed to encourage more healthful food choices through simple color-coded labels and the positioning of items in display cases was equally successful across all categories of employees in the MGH cafeteria.

08/06/2012: Behavioral intervention can reduce tics in adults with Tourette syndrome

Specially designed comprehensive behavioral therapy is more effective than sessions offering patient support and education in helping adults with Tourette syndrome manage their tics – sudden, repetitive motions or vocalizations – according to a new study.

08/01/2012: HIV-infected T cells help transport the virus throughout the body

A new study has discovered one more way that HIV exploits the immune system. Not only does the virus infect and destroy CD4 T cells – which normally direct and support the infection-fighting activities of other immune cells – the virus also appears to use those cells to travel through the body and infect other CD4 T cells.

08/01/2012: Mass. General and MassGeneral Hospital for Children launch new Down syndrome program

New Down syndrome program offers multiple clinics each week tailored to meet the unique medical and psychosocial needs of patients of all ages.

07/31/2012: MGH First & Only Hospital in New England to Offer LINX Procedure for Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

New, less invasive treatment using a flexible bracelet of magnetic beads may bring relief with fewer side effects than traditional surgery

07/26/2012: Do ovaries continue to produce eggs during adulthood?

A compelling new genetic study tracing the origins of immature egg cells, or 'oocytes', from the embryonic period throughout adulthood adds new information to a growing controversy.

07/26/2012: Controlling monkey brains and behavior with light

Researchers have shown for the first time that they can control the behavior of monkeys by using pulses of blue light to very specifically activate particular brain cells.

07/25/2012: CT angiography speeds emergency diagnosis of heart disease in low-risk patients

Incorporating coronary CT angiography into the initial evaluation of low-risk patients coming to hospital emergency departments with chest pain appears to reduce the time patients spend in the hospital without incurring additional costs or exposing patients to significant risks.

07/23/2012: Aspirin protects against Barrett's esophagus

Aspirin use appears to reduce the risk of Barrett's esophagus, the largest known risk factor for esophageal cancer.

07/22/2012: Increased cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients may relate to arterial inflammation

The elevated risk of cardiovascular disease seen in patients infected with HIV appears to be associated with increased inflammation within the arteries, according to a study in a special issue of JAMA published in conjunction with the International AIDS Conference.

07/18/2012: Mouse with human immune system may revolutionize HIV vaccine research

Researchers from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard report that a mouse model with a human immune system accurately reflects the human immune response to HIV infection and has the potential to reduce significantly the time and costs required to test candidate vaccines.

07/17/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Ranked #1 in the Nation on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Massachusetts General Hospital has moved into the number one spot on the 2012-13 U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Hospitals” list.

07/09/2012: Choice to use drug-eluting stents has little relation to patients' probable benefit

A new study finds that the use of drug-eluting stents after angioplasty bears little relationship to patients' predicted risk of restenosis (reblockage) of the treated coronary artery, the situation the devices are designed to prevent.

07/04/2012: Tumor microenvironment helps skin cancer cells resist drug treatment

New research by a team from the Broad Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Massachusetts General Hospital suggests that how cancer evade drug treatment may depend on the interplay between tumor cells and their healthy counterparts.

07/01/2012: Potential treatment target identified in an animal model of pancreatic cancer

Detailed analysis of genes expressed in circulating tumor cells – cells that break off from solid tumors and travel through the bloodstream – has identified a potential treatment target in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

06/27/2012: Immune response to heart attack worsens atherosclerosis, increases future risk

A heart attack doesn't just damage heart muscle tissue by cutting off its blood supply, it also sets off an inflammatory cascade that worsens underlying atherosclerosis, actively increasing the risk for a future heart attack, a new study finds.

06/26/2012: Tiny magnetic coils modulate neural activity, may be safer for deep-brain implants

Magnetic fields generated by microscopic devices implanted into the brain may be able to modulate brain-cell activity and reduce symptoms of several neurological disorders.

06/24/2012: Brain structure helps guide behavior by anticipating changing demands

A study from MGH researchers finds that a structure deep within the brain, believed to play an important role in regulating conscious control of goal-directed behavior, helps to optimize responses to changing conditions by predicting how difficult upcoming tasks will be.

06/12/2012: In the Hospital, the Noisy Hospital, the Patient Sleeps Tonight?

According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, MGH and Cambridge Health Alliance, certain noises in a common hospital setting can disrupt sleep and negatively affect brain activity and cardiovascular function.

06/11/2012: Brain area identified that determines distance from which sound originates

Researchers at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a portion of the brain responsible for determining how far away a sound originates, a process not relying solely on how loud the sound is.

06/10/2012: Natural HIV control may rely on sequence of T cell receptor protein

The rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection with their immune system alone appears to depend – at least partially – on specific qualities of the immune system's killer T cells and not on how many of those cells are produced.

06/06/2012: Analysis tracks how health care value has changed over 200 years

An analysis of records from the 200-year history of Massachusetts General Hospital reveals trends in the value of health care since the early 19th century.

06/04/2012: Mass General Hospital Opens New Sports Performance Center

This state-of-the-art facility combines the most advanced 3-D biomechanical imaging technology with the clinical expertise of Massachusetts General Hospital.

05/24/2012: New clues about cancer cell metabolism emerge

Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital have produced the first large-scale atlas of cancer metabolism, which points to a key role for the smallest amino acid, glycine, in cancer cell proliferation.

05/23/2012: Study supports urate protection against Parkinson's disease, hints at novel mechanism

Use of the antioxidant urate to protect against the neurodegeneration caused by Parkinson's disease appears to rely on more than urate's ability to protect against oxidative damage.

05/21/2012: Donor aortic graft improves reconstruction after partial laryngectomy

MGH surgeons have developed a new technique for reconstructing the larynx after surgery for advanced cancer. The approach uses cryopreserved aortas from deceased donors to replace removed larynx tissue and allows some patients to avoid a permanent tracheotomy and maintain voice and swallowing function.

05/21/2012: Study finds surgical residents often fatigued

A study involving 27 orthopedic surgery residents suggests that surgical residents are often fatigued during their awake time, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Surgery, a JAMA Network publication.

05/16/2012: People with paralysis control robotic arms using brain-computer interface

A new study in Nature reports that two people with tetraplegia were able to reach for and grasp objects in three-dimensional space using robotic arms that they controlled directly with brain activity.

05/16/2012: The "2012 Run-Walk to Home Base Presented By New Balance" At Fenway Takes Place This Sunday

The "2012 Run-Walk to Home Base Presented By New Balance"starts and ends at Fenway Park, with a timed finish at the iconic Green Monster and “photo finish” crossing home plate.

05/16/2012: Raising HDL not a sure route to countering heart disease

A new paper published online in The Lancet challenges the assumption that raising a person’s HDL — the so-called “good cholesterol” — will necessarily lower the risk of a heart attack.

05/15/2012: All cancer cells are not created equal

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers suggests that specific populations of tumor cells have different roles in the process by which tumors make new copies of themselves and grow.

05/14/2012: Laxative-free colon screening procedure may be as accurate as standard colonoscopy in detecting high-risk polyps

A CT-scan-based form of virtual colonoscopy that does not require laxative preparation appears to be as effective as standard colonoscopy in identifying the intestinal polyps most likely to become cancerous.

05/07/2012: Brief training program improves resident physicians’ empathy with patients

Resident physicians' participation in a brief training program designed to increase empathy with their patients produced significant improvement in how patients perceived their interactions with the residents.

04/19/2012: Researchers discover new genes contributing to autism, genetic links between neurodevelopment and psychiatric disorders

A new approach to investigating hard-to-find chromosomal abnormalities has identified 33 genes associated with autism and related disorders, 22 for the first time. Several of these genes also appear to be altered in different ways in individuals with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

04/16/2012: Adolescents can benefit from 12-step involvement

An assessment of 12-step meetings and recommended activities has found that attendance, participation, and finding a sponsor promote greater abstinence among adolescents.

04/12/2012: Research teams discover cellular system for detecting and responding to poisons and pathogens

Two MGH-based research teams, along with a group from the University of California at San Diego, have discovered that animals have a previously unknown system for detecting and responding to pathogens and toxins.

04/09/2012: Rapid method of assembling new gene-editing tool could revolutionize genetic research

Development of a new way to make a powerful tool for altering gene sequences should greatly increase the ability of researchers to knock out or otherwise alter the expression of any gene they are studying.

04/09/2012: Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines

Combining two strategies designed to improve the results of cancer treatment – antiangiogenesis drugs and nanomedicines – may only be successful if the smallest nanomedicines are used.

04/05/2012: Recovery from propofol anesthesia may be sped by use of common stimulant

The ability of the commonly used stimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) to speed recovery from general anesthesia appears to apply both to the inhaled gas isoflurane, as previously reported, and to the intravenous drug propofol.

04/05/2012: Big advance against cystic fibrosis

MGH researchers have taken a critical step in making possible the discovery in the relatively near future of a drug to control cystic fibrosis, a fatal lung disease that claims about 500 lives each year, with 1,000 new cases diagnosed annually.

04/04/2012: DNA sequencing consortium unveils patterns of mutations in autism

A consortium led by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and six other organizations has taken a step toward addressing the genetic component of autism by searching for mutations in the fraction of the human genome that codes for proteins.

03/30/2012: First Patient Treated in New England in Ventana U.S. Clinical Trial

Vascular surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) treated the first patient in New England in the Ventana U.S. Clinical Trial last week. MGH is one of 25 sites in the U.S. chosen to participate in this prospective, multicenter research study approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Ventana™ Fenestrated System for the endovascular repair of juxtarenal (JAA) and pararenal (PAA) aortic aneurysms.

03/30/2012: Study supports using virtual environment to teach mind/body techniques

A small study from MGH researchers found that online virtual communities may be an effective way to train patients in meditation and other mind/body techniques. The ability to learn and practice approaches that elicit the relaxation response in a virtual environment could help surmount several barriers that can restrict participation.

03/29/2012: Mass. General-led study reveals simple structure underlying complexity of the primate brain

An MGH research team has discovered a remarkably simple organizational structure in the brains of humans and other primates, finding that the pathways carrying neural signals through the brain are arranged not in a disorganized tangle but in a curved, three-dimensional grid

03/28/2012: The path to personalized cancer treatment

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have profiled genetic changes in cancer with drug sensitivity in order to develop a personalized approach to cancer treatments.

03/25/2012: Genetics of flu susceptibility

A genetic finding could help explain why influenza becomes a life-threating disease to some people while it has only mild effects in others.

03/20/2012: Taking vitamin E does not impact women’s heart failure risk

Taking vitamin E supplements does not increase or decrease heart failure risk among women, according to a study led by MGH physician Claudia Chae, MD.

03/08/2012: Deeper view of HIV reveals impact of early mutations

Mutations in HIV that develop during the first few weeks of infection may play a critical role in undermining a successful early immune response, a finding that reveals the importance of vaccines targeting regions of the virus that are less likely to mutate.

03/07/2012: Experimental drug reduces cortisol levels, improves symptoms in Cushing's disease

A new investigational drug significantly reduced urinary cortisol levels and improved symptoms of Cushing's disease in the largest clinical study of this endocrine disorder ever conducted.

03/07/2012: Diabetes drug halts atherosclerosis progression in HIV-infected patients

Treatment with the common diabetes drug metformin appears to prevent progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV.

03/01/2012: Study reveals how anesthetic isoflurane induces Alzheimer's-like changes in mammalian brains

The association of the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane with Alzheimer's-disease-like changes in mammalian brains may by caused by the drug's effects on mitochondria, the structures in which most cellular energy is produced.

02/29/2012: Ragon Institute study finds HIV-specific CD4 cells that control viral levels

A subpopulation of the immune cells targeted by HIV may play an important role in controlling viral loads after initial infection, potentially helping to determine how quickly infection will progress.

02/26/2012: Mass. General researchers isolate egg-producing stem cells from adult human ovaries

MGH researchers have isolated egg-producing stem cells from the ovaries of reproductive age women and shown these cells can produce what appear to be normal egg cells or oocytes.

02/21/2012: Study finds some insulin production in long-term type 1 diabetes

Massachusetts General Hospital research has found that insulin production may persist for decades after the onset of type 1 diabetes. Beta cell functioning also appears to be preserved in some patients years after apparent loss of pancreatic function.

02/16/2012: MGH Cancer Center team identifies potential treatment target for KRAS-mutated colon cancer

Researchers from the MGH Cancer Center have identified a new potential strategy for treating colon tumors driven by mutations in the KRAS gene, which usually resist both conventional and targeted treatments.

02/14/2012: Vitamin D treatment not found to reduce cardiovascular abnormalities in kidney disease patients

Almost a year's treatment with a vitamin D compound did not alleviate key structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with kidney disease and cardiac enlargement.

02/10/2012: EEG pattern reflects brain's shift into low-energy, protective mode

A distinctive pattern of brain activity associated with conditions including deep anesthesia, coma and congenital brain disorders appears to represent the brain's shift into a protective, low-activity state in response to reduced metabolic energy.

02/08/2012: Some physicians do not agree with, uphold standards on communication with patients

A significant minority of physicians responding to a national survey disagreed with or admitted not upholding accepted standards of professionalism for open and honest communication with patients.

02/06/2012: Mass. General, Jackson Laboratory researchers find clues to common birth defect in gene expression data

Researchers at MassGeneral Hospital for Children, The Jackson Laboratory and other institutes have uncovered 27 new candidate genes for congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a common and often deadly birth defect.

02/06/2012: Supporting the Mental Health of Veterans and Families

A series of 14 free, live, on-line trainings for primary care, VA, community mental health, and other providers begins Thursday, February 23, 2012.

02/01/2012: Blood test accurately distinguishes depressed patients from healthy controls

The initial assessment of a blood test to help diagnose major depressive disorder indicates it may become a useful clinical tool. A team including MGH researchers reports that analyzing levels of nine biomarkers accurately distinguished patients diagnosed with depression from control participants without significant false-positive results.

01/31/2012: Mass. General study defines a new genetic subtype of lung cancer

MGH Cancer Center investigators have defined the role of a recently identified gene abnormality – rearrangements in the ROS1 gene – in non-small-cell lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. They also show that these tumors can be treated with crizotinib and describe the remarkable response of one patient to such treatment.

01/19/2012: Color-coding, rearranging food products improves healthy choices in hospital cafeteria

A simple program involving color-coded food labeling and adjusting the way food items are positioned in display cases was successful in encouraging more healthful food choices in a large hospital cafeteria.

01/18/2012: Novel gene mutations associated with bile duct cancer

Investigators at the MGH Cancer Center have identified a new genetic signature associated with bile duct cancer, a usually deadly tumor for which effective treatment currently is limited.

01/16/2012: Combining two anti-HER2 drugs may provide better preoperative breast cancer treatment

Using two drugs that inhibit the growth factor HER2 for preoperative treatment of early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer appears to have better results than treatment with a single agent.

01/15/2012: Mass. General researchers find novel way to prevent drug-induced liver injury

MGH investigators have developed a novel strategy to protect the liver from drug-induced injury and improve associated drug safety. The team reports that inhibition of a type of cell-to-cell communication can protect against the damage caused by liver-toxic drugs such as acetaminophen.

01/12/2012: Newly identified type of immune cell may be important protector against sepsis

Investigators in the MGH Center for Systems Biology have discovered a previously unknown type of immune cell, a B cell that can produce the important growth factor GM-CSF, which stimulates many other immune cells. They also found that these novel cells may help protect against the overwhelming, life-threatening immune reaction known as sepsis.

01/11/2012: Participating in marathons, half-marathons not found to increase risk of cardiac arrest

A new study finds that participating in these races actually is associated with a relatively low risk of cardiac arrest, compared to other forms of athletics. The study also identifies bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation as a key factor in patient survival.

01/10/2012: How can pediatric HIV be eliminated in Zimbabwe?

Eliminating new infant HIV infections in Zimbabwe will require not only improved access to antiretroviral medications but also support to help HIV-infected mothers continue taking their medication and safely reduce or eliminate breastfeeding, according to study led by MGH investigators.

12/19/2011: What makes patients complex? Ask their primary care physicians

Being able to define and measure patient complexity has important implications for how care is organized, how physicians and health care systems are paid, and how resources are allocated. A study by MGH researchers finds that primary care physicians define patient complexity using more factors than are used in common approaches.

12/19/2011: Commentary calls for greater awareness of Internet pharmacies' role in prescription drug abuse

In a commentary in the December 20 Annals of Internal Medicine, investigators from MGH, the University of Southern California, and the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University describe the probable contribution of Internet pharmacies to prescription drug abuse and outline potential strategies for addressing the problem.

12/18/2011: Increased expression of regulatory enzyme may protect against neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease

Treatment that increases brain levels of an important regulatory enzyme may slow the loss of brain cells that characterizes Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

12/10/2011: Run to Home Base Presented by New Balance Adds a Walk Option for 2012 Event; Fenway Park’s Famed Home Plate is Finish Line in May

3rd Annual Run-Walk benefits Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Families Affected by Combat Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury

12/07/2011: Traumatic injury sets off a "genomic storm" in immune system pathways

Serious traumatic injuries, including major burns, set off a "genomic storm" in human immune cells, altering around 80 percent of the cells' normal gene expression patterns.

12/01/2011: Mass. General study finds amplification of multiple cell-growth genes in some brain tumors

A small percentage of the deadly brain tumors called glioblastomas, which usually resist treatment with drugs targeting mutations in cell-growth genes, appears to contain extra copies of two or three of these genes at the same time. The surprising discovery has major implications for the understanding of tumor biology and for targeted cancer therapies.

11/29/2011: Growth Hormone Increases Bone Formation in Obese Women

In a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, growth hormone replacement for six months was found to increase bone formation in abdominally obese women.

11/24/2011: Rebuilding the Brain’s Circuitry

Neuron transplants have repaired brain circuitry and substantially normalized function in mice with a brain disorder, an advance indicating that key areas of the mammalian brain are more reparable than was widely believed.

11/20/2011: Novel ALS drug slows symptom progression, reduces mortality in phase 2 trial

Treatment with dexpramipexole – a novel drug believed to prevent dysfunction of mitochondria, the subcellular structures that provide most of a cell's energy – appears to slow symptom progression in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also called Lou Gehrig's disease.

11/15/2011: Denosumab delays development of prostate cancer bone metastasis

An international clinical trial has found that treatment with a drug that suppresses the normal breakdown of bone can delay the development of bone metastases in men with prostate cancer.

11/13/2011: Newly identified gene mutation adds to melanoma risk

A major international study has identified a novel gene mutation that appears to increase the risk of both inherited and sporadic cases of malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. The identified mutation occurs in the gene encoding MITF, a transcription factor that induces the production of several important proteins in melanocytes, the cells in which melanoma originates.

11/06/2011: Combined arterial imaging technology reveals both structural and metabolic details

A new device that combines two microimaging technologies can reveal both the detailed anatomy of arterial linings and biological activities that, in coronary arteries, could indicate the risk of heart attacks or the formation of clots in arterial stents.

10/27/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital: 2011 Winner of American Association of Medical Colleges’Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service

The Association of American Medical Colleges, representing medical schools and teaching hospitals and health systems, has awarded MGH its 2011 Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. (Scroll down for video).

10/17/2011: Biomarker-guided heart failure treatment significantly reduces complications

Adding regular testing for blood levels of a biomarker of cardiac distress to standard care for the most common form of heart failure may significantly reduce the incidence of cardiovascular complications, a new MGH study finds.

10/09/2011: Novel technique uses RNA interference to block inflammation

MGH researchers – along with collaborators from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals – have found a way to block, in an animal model, the damaging inflammation that contributes to many disease conditions.

10/06/2011: Expression of pluripotency-associated gene marks many types of adult stem cells

Investigators at the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have found that Sox2 – one of the transcription factors used in the conversion of adult stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells – is expressed in many adult tissues where it had not been previously observed.

10/05/2011: Health Affairs article focuses on health care disparities facing people with disabilities

In the October issue of Health Affairs, Lisa Iezzoni, MD, director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH, analyzes available information on disparities affecting people with disabilities and highlights barriers that continue to restrict their access to health services.

10/03/2011: Biomarker for Huntington's disease identified

In a new research paper BWH and MGH researchers identify a transcriptional biomarker that may assist in the monitoring of Huntington's disease activity and in the evaluation of new medications.

09/27/2011: Saw palmetto no better than placebo in relieving prostate symptoms, even at high doses

Long-term administration of the dietary supplement saw palmetto, even at three times the usual dose, did not reduce symptoms of prostate enlargement significantly better than placebo in a large group of middle-aged men.

09/21/2011: Common stimulant may speed recovery from general anesthesia

Administration of the commonly used stimulant drug methylphenidate was able to speed recovery from general anesthesia in an animal study conducted at MGH. The report is the first demonstration in mammals of what could be a safe and effective way to induce arousal from general anesthesia.

09/20/2011: Christopher J. McDougle named director of the Lurie Center for Autism

Christopher J. McDougle, MD has been named director of the Lurie Center for Autism at Massachusetts General Hospital and MassGeneral Hospital for Children.

09/12/2011: Social contacts, self-confidence crucial to successful recovery through Alcoholics Anonymous

Among the many ways that participation in Alcoholics Anonymous helps its members stay sober, two appear to be most important – spending more time with individuals who support efforts towards sobriety and increased confidence in the ability to maintain abstinence in social situations.

09/11/2011: International study identifies new gene targets for hypertension treatment

A new report from MGH scientists and colleagues around the world finds that common variants in 28 regions of DNA are associated with blood pressure in human patients. Most of the identified regions were completely unsuspected, and several may lead to a totally new class of hypertension drugs.

09/05/2011: Study confirms that living with a smoker increases absenteeism in school children

Children who live in households where they are exposed to tobacco smoke miss more days of school than do children living in smoke-free homes. A report from MGH investigators also finds such children have higher rates of respiratory illnesses caused by second-hand smoke and details the probable economic costs of increased their school absences.

08/21/2011: Imaging probe allows noninvasive detection of dangerous heart-valve infection

A novel imaging probe developed by MGH investigators may make it possible to diagnose accurately a dangerous infection of the heart valves

08/17/2011: Most physicians will face malpractice claims, but risk of making payment is low

While most U.S. physicians will face a malpractice lawsuit at some time in their careers, a new study finds, the vast majority of those suits will not result in payment to a plaintiff. The report provides the most comprehensive analysis of the risk of malpractice claims by specialty in more than two decades.

08/10/2011: Could an 'ankle hotline' relieve strain on health care demands?

MGH investigators suggest that – since strains and sprains, which account for over a third of lower extremity injuries treated at emergency departments, are not life-threatening – telephone triage and scheduled care appointments might be a better use of precious emergency healthcare resources.

08/03/2011: Natural killer cells participate in immune response against HIV

A new study shows for the first time that natural killer cells, which are part of the body's first-line defence against infection, can contribute to the immune response against HIV. The findings may help develop new preventive or treatment strategies.

08/02/2011: Pilot study suggests new approach to treat preeclampsia

A novel therapy that reduces elevated blood levels of a potentially toxic protein in women with preeclampsia, a dangerous complication of pregnancy, may someday address the therapeutic dilemma posed by the condition – balancing life-threatening risks to the mother with the dangers that early delivery poses to an immature fetus.

07/15/2011: New guide helps doctors identify signs of trouble in military families

New tool is designed to help pediatricians and other clinicians identify and address the signs of deployment-related stress among children and families.

07/14/2011: Mass. General Hospital to Deploy Staff to Haiti in Response to Rising Cholera Cases

On Sunday, July 17, The MGH Center for Global Health will deploy 6 clinicians to Hospital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles, Haiti, in response to resurging cases of cholera.

07/13/2011: Taking out a cancer’s co-dependency

Scientists at the Broad Institute and MGH have discovered a novel compound that selectively blocks the ability of cancer cells to block the oxidative stress produced by rapid tumor growth, killing cancer cells more effectively than a currently used chemotherapy drug.

07/13/2011: Large clinical trial shows short-term hormone therapy plus radiation increases survival for men with early-stage prostate cancer

Short-term hormone therapy given in combination with radiation therapy for men with early-stage prostate cancer increases their chance of living longer and not dying from the disease, compared with patients who receive the same radiation therapy alone.

07/12/2011: Changes in family history of cancer can impact screening recommendations

A multi-institutional research team has found that details of a family history of cancer – which can affect recommendations for screening examinations such as colonoscopies and mammograms – frequently change in adults aged 30 to 50.

07/10/2011: High-resolution imaging technology reveals cellular details of coronary arteries

Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at MGH have developed a one-micrometer-resolution version of the intravascular imaging technology optical coherence tomography that can reveal cellular and subcellular features of coronary artery disease.

07/08/2011: Red Sox Foundation and Mass General Hospital Home Base Program wins national grant from McCormick Foundation and Major League Baseball to expand services

A $1.1 million competitive national grant from the McCormick Foundation and Major League Baseball will be used to support the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program to expand access to care for veterans with traumatic brain injury or combat stress and support services for their families.

07/07/2011: Study suggests new strategy to prevent infertility, birth defects

A strategy that has been shown to reduce age-related health problems in several animal studies may also combat a major cause of age-associated infertility and birth defects.

07/01/2011: Mass. General team identifies new class of antiangiogenesis drugs

MGH researchers have discovered the first of an entirely new class of antiangiogenesis drugs – agents that interfere with the development of blood vessels. The compound, derived from a South American tree, uses a novel mechanism to block blood vessel formation.

06/30/2011: Mass General Imaging brings 3D mammography to Worcester

Mass General Imaging - Worcester now introduces 3D mammography technology that promises to improve breast cancer detection.

06/24/2011: ICER Releases Comprehensive Appraisal of Management Options for Patients with Low Back Disorders

A comprehensive appraisal of management options for patients with low-back disorders was released today by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, based within the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment.

06/24/2011: Mass. General Hospital, Iacocca Foundation announce promising results of Phase I diabetes trial

Promising results of a Phase I clinical trial of the generic drug BCG to treat advanced type I diabetes are being announced today at the American Diabetes Association scientific sessions. An MGH research team is describing the apparent reproduction in human patients of a mechanism that reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model.

06/23/2011: Rare genetic disorder provides unique insight into Parkinson’s disease

MGH investigators may have found the mechanism behind a previously reported link between the rare genetic condition Gaucher disease and the common neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease.

06/21/2011: Scientists reveal HIV weakness

In a new finding that may allow vaccine designers to sidestep HIV's rapid mutation rate, researchers at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have identified sections of an HIV protein where mutations would actually undermine the virus’ fitness – its ability to survive and reproduce.

06/20/2011: Mental Health of Returning Veterans is Focus of 3rd Annual Boston Conference

Many of the nation’s top experts in mental health care for veterans gather in Boston to assist community-based healthcare professionals to effectively identify and treat returning veterans who suffer from psychological and physical wounds of deployment.

06/20/2011: Free Conference for Clergy and Spiritual Leaders Focuses on Mental Health of Returning Veterans Affected by Combat Stress

Clergy members and spiritual leaders of all denominations are invited to attend an innovative symposium that focuses on understanding and guiding the recovery of veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as their families.

06/17/2011: The Wonder of Lunder

Celebrating 200 years of medical innovation and advancement, Massachusetts General Hospital designates June 20-24, 2011, Lunder Dedication Week, to highlight the opening of the new 14-floor building that will expand clinical space at the heart of the main campus.

06/14/2011: Ride for our Heroes

New England-area motorcycle enthusiasts are kick starting their bikes and riding in the first Ride for Our Heroes on Saturday September 24. Ride for Our Heroes supports the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program’s services for veterans and families affected by combat stress and traumatic brain injury.

06/12/2011: Single GFP-expressing cell is basis of living laser device

Two investigators at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a living laser, in which a single cell genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein is used to amplify photons into nanosecond-long pulses of laser light

06/06/2011: Women's risk of heart disease after gestational diabetes differs by race

New research finds that gestational diabetes, or pregnancy-related diabetes, may not raise the risk of heart disease independent of other cardiovascular risk factors except in certain high-risk populations.

06/05/2011: Athletic girls more likely to have impaired bone structure if menstrual cycle stops

Young female athletes who have stopped menstruating have a weakening in the quality of their bone structure that may predispose them to breaking a bone, despite getting plenty of weight-bearing exercise, a new study finds.

06/04/2011: Anorexic girls have increased bone density after physiological estrogen treatment

Estrogen therapy improves low bone density in teenage girls with anorexia nervosa when given as a patch or at an oral dose close to the form or amount the body makes naturally.

06/01/2011: Physicians Call For New Approach To Address National “Epidemic Of Mass Incarceration”

The authors of a New England Journal of Medicine Perspective article link the U.S. “epidemic of mass incarceration” to inadequate treatment of addiction and mental illness.

05/31/2011: Long-term study data supports association between childhood ADHD and substance abuse risk

An analysis of more than 10 years of data confirms that ADHD alone significantly increases the risk of future cigarette smoking and substance abuse in both boys and girls.

05/25/2011: Mass General Imaging leads charge to reduce CT radiation with launch of research center, publication of clinical protocols

First-of-its-kind Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation devoted to achieving the lowest radiation dose for every patient. Availability of CT exam protocols gives radiology practitioners worldwide access to more than a decade’s worth of clinical expertise on reducing radiation exposure

05/22/2011: The Dance of the Cells: A Minuet or a Mosh?

The physical forces that guide how cells manage to get from place to place inside the living body are poorly understood. Now scientists have for the first time devised a way to measure these forces during collective cellular migration.

05/17/2011: Deer tick bacteria DNA in joint fluid not reliable marker of active lyme arthritis

New research shows that PCR testing for Borrelia burgdorferi DNA—the spirochetal bacteria transmitted by deer ticks—in joint fluid may confirm the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, but is not a reliable indicator for active joint infection in patients whose arthritis persists.

05/12/2011: Increase in Internet access parallels growth in prescription drug abuse

Increasing access to rogue online pharmacies that dispense medications without a doctor's prescription may be an important factor behind the rapid increase in the abuse of prescription drugs.

05/12/2011: African Americans and the General Public Support Banning Menthol in Cigarettes

According to a new study released online today, a majority of Americans, including most African Americans, stand together in support of banning menthol in cigarettes just as other cigarette flavorings have now been banned by the FDA.

05/11/2011: Mild obesity appears to improve survival in ALS patients

Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be an exception to the rule that being overweight is a health hazard. In a retrospective study of over 400 ALS patients, MGH researchers found that those who were mildly obese survived longer than patients who were normal weight, underweight or even overweight.

05/09/2011: Important step in breakdown of HIV proteins is critical to immune system recognition, destruction of infected cells

Researchers at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have found that – as HIV proteins are broken down within cells, a process that should help label infected cells for destruction – the stability of resulting protein segments varies greatly, variations that may change how well cells are recognized by the immune system.

05/05/2011: Combination of ADHD and poor emotional control runs in families

A subgroup of adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also exhibit excessive emotional reactions to everyday occurrences, and this combination of ADHD and emotional reactivity appears to run in families, an MGH study finds.

05/01/2011: Children held captive in smoky vehicles

Study led by MGHfC investigator Jonathan Winickoff, MD, MPH, finds that children of parents who smoke are often exposed to tobacco in their parent's cars.

04/21/2011: Meditation may help the brain "turn down the volume" on distractions

The positive effects of mindfulness meditation on pain and working memory may result from an improved ability to regulate a crucial brain wave called the alpha rhythm, which is thought to "turn down the volume" on distracting information.

04/19/2011: Severe obesity not seen to increase risk of depression in teens

According to a new study, severely obese adolescents are no more likely to be depressed than normal weight peers. The study, which has been released online in the Journal of Adolescent Health, did find that white adolescents may be somewhat more vulnerable to psychological effects of obesity.

04/13/2011: Differences in brain structure indicate risk for developing Alzheimer's disease

Subtle differences in brain anatomy among older individuals with normal cognitive skills may be able to predict both the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in the following decade and how quickly symptoms of dementia would develop.

04/04/2011: Special Military Discount and New Fundraising Prizes Announced for the 2011 Run to Home Base

In addition to crossing home plate, runners will be able to win terrific prizes including Green Monster tickets, New Balance gift cards and autographed Red Sox jerseys.

03/30/2011: Alzheimer's-like brain changes found in cognitively normal elders with amyloid plaques

Researchers using two brain-imaging technologies have found that apparently normal older individuals with brain deposits of amyloid beta – the primary constituent of the plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients – also had changes in brain structure similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

03/27/2011: Advanced technology reveals activity of single neurons during seizures

The first study to examine the activity of hundreds of individual human brain cells during seizures has found that seizures begin with extremely diverse neuronal activity, contrary to the classic view that they are characterized by massively synchronized activity.

03/24/2011: BrainGate neural interface system reaches 1,000-day performance milestone

An investigational implanted system being developed to translate brain signals toward control of assistive devices has allowed a woman with paralysis to accurately control a computer cursor at 2.7 years after implantation, providing a key demonstration that neural activity can be read out and converted into action for an unprecedented length of time.

03/23/2011: Mass. General study reveals how lung cancers evolve in response to targeted treatment

A detailed analysis of lung tumors that became resistant to targeted therapy drugs has revealed two previously unreported resistance mechanisms. The report also describes how the cellular nature of some tumors can change in response to treatment and finds how resistance-conferring mutations can disappear after treatment is discontinued.

03/23/2011: Epigenomic findings illuminate veiled variants

Genes make up only a tiny percentage of the human genome, but the rest may hold vital clues about the genetic origins of disease. Using a new mapping strategy, a research team has begun to assign meaning to the regions beyond our genes and has revealed how minute changes in these regions might be connected to common diseases.

03/21/2011: Most Parents Support Testing Children for Tobacco Smoke Exposure

A new study, to be published in the April 2011 issue of Pediatrics, shows that 60 percent of parents -- smoking and non-smoking -- indicate that they would like their children tested for tobacco smoke exposure during pediatric visits.

03/20/2011: Metabolite levels may be able to improve diabetes risk prediction

Measuring the levels of small molecules in the blood may be able to identify individuals at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes as much as a decade before symptoms of the disorder appear.

03/18/2011: Mass General publishes book outlining 200 years of medical care and progress

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) today celebrates the launch of its new history book, Something in the Ether: A Bicentennial History of Massachusetts General Hospital, 1811-2011, by local author Webster Bull and his daughter, Martha Bull. The 527-page hardcover volume commemorates 200 years of medicine, capturing the spirit of the nation’s third oldest general hospital as conveyed through work of some of the most captivating, colorful and inspiring characters in health care, past and present.

03/15/2011: Current projections greatly underestimate impact of Haitian cholera epidemic

A new mathematical model of the Haitian cholera epidemic, based on current knowledge about the transmission and course of the disease, finds that current projections regarding the size and extent of the epidemic may greatly underestimate the eventual number of cases.

03/14/2011: Tumor suppressor blocks viral growth in natural HIV controllers

Elevated levels of p21, a protein best known as a cancer fighter, may be involved in the ability of a few individuals to control HIV infection with their immune system alone.

03/09/2011: Aspirin's ability to protect against colorectal cancer may depend on risk-associated inflammatory pathways

The reduced risk of colorectal cancer associated with taking aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be limited to individuals already at risk because of elevations in a specific inflammatory factor in the blood.

03/07/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital is first in the nation to do mammography screening using 3D breast tomosynthesis

The Breast Imaging Program at Massachusetts General Hospital today welcomes its first patient to undergo three-dimensional breast tomosynthesis screening. Also known as 3D mammography, this technology promises to improve cancer detection and reduce false positives.

03/07/2011: Increased, mandatory screenings help identify more kids with emotional/behavioral problems

An MGHfC study published in the March 2011 Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine shows that Massachusetts' new court-ordered mental health screening and intervention program led to more children being identified as behaviorally and emotionally at risk.

03/06/2011: International collaborative identifies 13 new heart-disease-associated gene sites

An international research collaboration has identified 13 new gene sites associated with the risk of coronary artery disease and validated 10 sites found in previous studies. Several of the novel sites discovered do not appear to relate to known risk factors, suggesting previously unsuspected mechanisms for cardiovascular disease.

03/04/2011: MGH Orthopaedic Surgeon’s Breakthrough Findings Honored with Research Award

Dr. Young-Min Kwon honored with Kappa Delta Investigator Award for outstanding research in Orthopaedic surgery.

03/03/2011: Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

A new study finds that a brain rhythm considered the hallmark of wakefulness not only persists inconspicuously during sleep but also signifies an individual's vulnerability to disturbance by the outside world.

02/22/2011: Protective strategy shields primate ovaries from radiation-therapy-induced damage

A strategy developed by MGH researchers to shield the ovaries of female mammals from the damaging effects of radiation and chemotherapy has passed an important milestone with the report that brief pretreatment with an FDA-approved drug preserved the fertility of female rhesus monkeys exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation.

02/16/2011: Enzyme helps prepare lung tissue for metastatic development

An MGH study has identified a new role for an important enzyme in preparing lung tissue for the development of metastases. The findings may help development of strategies to slow or halt the process.

02/10/2011: Tumor microvesicles reveal detailed genetic information

The MGH research team that previously discovered tumor-associated RNA in tiny membrane-enclosed sacs released into the bloodstream by cancer cells has now found that these microvesicles also contain segments of tumor DNA, including so-called "jumping genes" that copy and insert themselves into other areas of the genome.

02/03/2011: Homeless people without enough to eat are more likely to be hospitalized

Homeless people who do not get enough to eat use hospitals and emergency rooms at very high rates, according to a new study from MGH and Boston Health Care for the Homeless.

02/02/2011: Generic drug may improve the effectiveness of cancer nanotherapies

Low doses of an inexpensive, FDA-approved hypertension medication may improve the results of nanotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment.

01/26/2011: Growth-factor-containing nanoparticles accelerate healing of chronic wounds

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a novel system for delivery of growth factors to chronic wounds such as pressure sores and diabetic foot ulcers.

01/21/2011: Mindfulness meditation training changes brain structure in 8 weeks

Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress.

01/21/2011: CT scanning aids rapid diagnosis, treatment planning for abdominal pain

The use of CT scanning to evaluate abdominal pain in emergency departments can help physicians arrive at a diagnosis quickly and decisively.

01/18/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital leading nationwide, comparative study of common bipolar medications

The Massachusetts General Hospital Bipolar Clinic and Research Program is launching a 10-site nationwide trial evaluating the real-world advantages and disadvantages of second generation mood stabilizing medications compared to lithium.

01/13/2011: Overexpression of repetitive DNA sequences discovered in common tumor cells

MGH Cancer Center researchers have discovered a previously unknown feature of common tumor cells – massive overexpression of satellite repeats, which are DNA sequences that do not code for proteins. The findings may improve understanding of tumor development and provide a new cancer biomarker.

01/10/2011: Statin risks may outweigh benefits for patients with a history of brain hemorrhage

A computer decision model suggests that for patients with a history of bleeding within the brain, the risk of recurrence associated with statin treatment may outweigh the benefit of the drug in preventing cardiovascular disease, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the May print issue of Archives of Neurology.

01/03/2011: Mass. General Hospital enters collaboration to develop new approach to capturing circulating tumor cells

MGH has entered into a collaborative agreement with Veridex LLC to establish a center of excellence in research on circulating tumor cell technologies.

12/29/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital celebrates 200 years in 2011

January 1, 2011, marks the start on Mass General's bicentennial anniversary. Find out how the hospital is celebrating this momentous milestone.

12/29/2010: Uncovering the neurobiological basis of general anesthesia

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, author of a New England Journal of Medicine review article, lays out a conceptual framework for understanding general anesthesia by discussing its relation to sleep and coma.

12/27/2010: Newborns with low vitamin D levels at increased risk for respiratory infections

Vitamin D levels of newborn babies appear to predict their risk of respiratory infections during infancy and the occurrence of wheezing during early childhood, but not the risk of developing asthma.

12/27/2010: Structure deep within the brain may contribute to a rich, varied social life

Scientists have discovered that the amygdala, a small almond shaped structure deep within the temporal lobe, is important to a rich and varied social life among humans.

12/22/2010: A Run Like No Other: Fenway Park’s Famed Home Plate is Finish Line for “2011 Run to Home Base Presented by New Balance” on Sunday, May 22, 2011

Thousands of fans who participate in the annual run will be able to experience the thrill of crossing home plate at Fenway Park while raising funds to support clinical treatment for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

12/22/2010: Mortality rates are an unreliable metric for assessing hospital quality, study finds

A comparative analysis found wide disparities in the results of four common measures of hospital-wide mortality rates, with competing methods yielding both higher- and lower-than-expected rates for the same hospitals during the same year.

12/16/2010: Mass. General Hospital's Warren Triennial Prize to honor pioneers of cellular reprogramming

The 2011 Warren Triennial Prize – the top scientific award presented by the MGH – will be awarded to Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, and Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, pioneers in developing methods to reprogram adult cells into pluripotent cells with the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells.

12/14/2010: The effects of spirituality in Alcoholics Anonymous on alcohol dependence

A new study shows that, as attendance at AA meetings increases, so do the participants' spiritual beliefs, especially in those individuals who had low spirituality at the beginning of the study.

12/13/2010: Apartment-dwelling children in nonsmoking units still exposed to tobacco

A new study from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and the University of Rochester Medical Center shows significant evidence of tobacco smoke exposure in the blood of children who live in multi-unit housing.

12/12/2010: MGH researchers develop faster method of engineering zinc-finger nucleases

A team led by MGH researchers has developed a faster way to engineer synthetic enzymes that target specific DNA sequences for inactivation, repair or alteration.

12/09/2010: Cholera strain in Haiti matches bacteria from South Asia

A team of researchers has determined that the strain of cholera erupting in Haiti matches bacterial samples from South Asia and not those from Latin America. The scientists conclude that the bacteria introduced into Haiti most likely came from an infected human, contaminated food or other item from outside of Latin America.

12/06/2010: Psychotic-like symptoms associated with poor outcomes in patients with depression

Among patients with depression, the presence of symptoms associated with bipolar disorder does not appear to be associated with treatment resistance, according to a study from MGH investigators. However, many patients with depression also report psychotic-like symptoms, such as hearing voices or believing they are being spied on or plotted against, and those patients are less likely to respond to treatment.

12/02/2010: Patriots and Mass General Hospital to raise awareness for colorectal cancer at Monday night's game

As part of the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation's season-long "Kick Cancer" initiative, and in partnership with Mass General Hospital, the Patriots will promote colorectal cancer awareness at the December 6 Monday night matchup at Gillette Stadium versus the New York Jets.

12/01/2010: Tumors bring their own support cells when forming metastases

A new study from MGH Cancer Center researchers finds that circulating tumor cells bring along from the original tumor site noncancerous cells that facilitate the development of metastases.

11/30/2010: Dr. Peter Slavin to chair AAMC council of teaching hospitals administrative board

MGH President Peter L. Slavin appointed chair of a council representing the interests of major teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada.

11/30/2010: Belly Fat Puts Women at Risk for Osteoporosis

A study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America found that having too much internal abdominal fat may have a damaging effect on bone health.

11/23/2010: Probiotics under study as treatment for IBS and depression

A new study will measure the ability of probiotic bacteria GanedenBC30 (Bacillus coagulans GB1-30, 6086) to help people diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and major depressive disorder (MDD).

11/22/2010: ICER Publishes Systematic Review of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography

A systematic review of the use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography for patients with suspected coronary artery disease found that the technology has high diagnostic accuracy but was unable to determine its effectiveness in supporting clinical decision-making or improving patient outcomes.

11/18/2010: Culturally sensitive treatment model helps bring depressed Chinese immigrants into treatment

A treatment model designed to accommodate the beliefs and concerns of Chinese immigrants increased the percentage of depressed patients entering treatment nearly sevenfold.

11/18/2010: ICER Launches RAPiD Initiative through Formation of New England Healthcare Advisory Council

With backing from a consortium of New England state health policy leaders, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review - the based at the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment - will spearhead the formation of a New England Healthcare Advisory Council to provide objective, independent guidance on the application of medical evidence to clinical practice and payer policy decisions across New England.

11/12/2010: Mathematical model of the life cycle of red blood cells may predict risk of anemia

An MGH physician-researcher and a Harvard University mathematician have collaborated to develop a mathematical model reflecting how red blood cells change during their four-month lifespan. The model uses data from routine blood tests and may be able to predict the development of anemia.

11/11/2010: MassGeneral Hospital for Children celebrates 10 years of excellence in pediatrics

MGH celebrates 100 years of comprehensive pediatric services, 50 years of pediatric surgery, and a decade as Mass General Hospital for Children.

11/10/2010: Romiplostim more effective than standard care for immune thrombocytopenia

A new study finds that an FDA-approved drug to treat the rare autoimmune disorder immune thromobocytopenia (ITP) is more effective than earlier medical therapies in helping patients avoid surgical treatment and significantly improving their quality of life.

11/09/2010: Combined Imaging Technologies May Better Identify Cancerous Breast Lesions

By combining optical and x-ray imaging, radiologists may be better able to distinguish cancer from benign lesions in the breast, according to an MGH study.

11/08/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health to Host Inaugural Symposium

Broadening the Response: The Role of Academic Medical Centers in Global Health, will bring together the foremost global health leaders and policy makers to discuss how best to build, strengthen and expand on global partnerships.

11/08/2010: Although less prevalent, physician-industry relationships remain common

A new survey finds that, while the number of physicians who report having relationships with pharmaceutical manufacturers or other industrial companies has dropped in recent years, the vast majority of them still maintain such relationships.

11/05/2010: President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists

President Obama today named 85 researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

11/04/2010: Small protein changes may make big difference in natural HIV control

Tiny variants in a protein that alerts the immune system to the presence of infection may underlie the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection without the need for medications.

11/03/2010: Half of those travelling internationally not aware of potential health risks

International travel is the primary way many infections traverse the world. Despite these potential risks, a recent study conducted by the Division of Infectious Diseases found that 46 percent of travelers to resource-limited countries did not seek health advice or vaccinations prior to departure.

10/28/2010: Tighter ethics rules have reduced industrial relationship of NIH scientists

The 2005 ethics rules that govern relationships between researchers within the National Institutes of Health and pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other industrial companies have significantly reduced the prevalence of such collaborations without affecting standard measures of research productivity.

10/28/2010: Study identifies flaws in Medicare prescription drug program

Millions of Medicare recipients have been forcibly reassigned to different prescription drug plans because Part D reimbursements to insurance companies covering low-income patients are lower than the actual costs incurred, according to a study from the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH.

10/27/2010: New targeted lung cancer drug produces 'dramatic' symptom improvement

A clinical trial of a potential new targeted treatment drug has provided powerful evidence that it can halt or reverse the growth of lung tumors characterized by alterations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene.

10/18/2010: Intestinal enzyme helps maintain population of beneficial bacteria

An enzyme that keeps intestinal bacteria out of the bloodstream may also play an important role in maintaining the normal microbial population of the gastrointestinal system.

10/18/2010: EACH and ICER Launch Prostate Cancer Decision Aid Website

The Employers Action Coalition on Healthcare and the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, part of the Massachusetts General Hospital’s Institute for Technology Assessment, are launching a new website designed to give patients recently diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer objective information about treatment choices.

10/15/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital launches $1.5 billion fundraising campaign

Massachusetts General Hospital today formally launched the largest fundraising campaign in its history and the most ambitious capital campaign ever among health care institutions in New England.

10/15/2010: Health care education collaboration builds on relationships between Maine health care providers, patients and Massachusetts General Hospital

A new educational collaboration between Maine and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) seeks to expand the range of health care education programs, materials and opportunities available to providers, patients, families and veterans throughout the state of Maine.

10/14/2010: Molecular switch controls melanin production, may allow true sunless tanning

Discovery of a molecular switch that turns off the natural process of skin pigmentation may lead to a novel way of protecting the skin – activating the tanning process without exposure to cancer-causing UV radiation.

10/12/2010: Second-generation device more effective in capturing circulating tumor cells

A redesigned version of the CTC-Chip – a microchip-based device for capturing rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – appears to be more effective and should be easier to manufacture than the original. Called the HB-(herringbone) Chip, the new device also may provide more comprehensive and easily accessible data from captured tumor cells.

10/10/2010: Studies provide new insights into the genetics of obesity and fat distribution

An international consortium has made significant inroads into uncovering the genetic basis of obesity by identifying 18 new gene sites associated with overall obesity and 13 that affect fat distribution. The studies include data from nearly a quarter of a million participants, the largest genetic investigation of human traits to date.

09/30/2010: ICER Completes Comprehensive Appraisal of Common Strategies for Atrial Fibrillation Management

A comprehensive appraisal of the management options for the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, prepared by the MGH-based Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, details the comparative clinical effectiveness and value of several strategies for restoring rhythm control and preventing stroke.

09/27/2010: The Patriots Aim to Kick Cancer

Nearly 70,000 fans pack the stands at Gillette Stadium for every Patriots home game and, statistically, far too many of them will develop cancer in their lifetimes. With support from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital – the founding hospitals of Partners HealthCare – and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation has launched Kick Cancer, a season-long initiative to increase cancer awareness among Patriots fans.

09/24/2010: Disparities in heart attack treatment may begin in the emergency room

The well-documented disparities in cardiac care may begin almost as soon as patients arrive at hospital emergency rooms, Mass. General investigators find.

09/15/2010: $40 million awarded to trace human brain's connections

The National Institutes of Health has awarded grants totaling $40 million to map the human brain's connections in high resolution. Better understanding of such connectivity promises improved diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders.

09/14/2010: Present imperfect: Doctors in training work even when ill

Researchers report that three out of five resident physicians responding to a survey came to work in the previous year while sick, possibly exposing their patients and colleagues to suboptimal performance and, in many cases, communicable disease.

09/07/2010: Quality measurement programs could shortchange physicians caring for at-risk patients

Evaluating the quality of care delivered by individual physicians without accounting for such factors as their patients' socioeconomic status or insurance coverage risks undervaluing the work of those caring for a higher proportion of vulnerable patients.

08/31/2010: Driver's education for the brain teaches social and emotional competency in the classroom

The Massachusetts General Hospital School Psychiatry Program announces the creation of an educational curriculum to help teachers train their students' brains. Doctors say such efforts could curb bullying by helping students develop core social and emotional skills.

08/30/2010: Microfluidic device allows collection, analysis of hard-to-handle immune cells

A team led by MGH scientists has developed a new microfluidic tool for quickly and accurately isolating neutrophils – the most abundant type of white blood cell – from small blood samples, an accomplishment that could provide information essential to better understanding the immune system's response to traumatic injury.

08/25/2010: Targeted drug leads to rapid regression of metastatic melanoma in patients with mutated BRAF gene

Use of an experimental targeted drug to treat metastatic melanoma tumors with a specific genetic signature was successful in more than 80 percent of patients in a phase 1 clinical trial.

08/25/2010: Grapefruit's bitter taste holds a sweet promise for diabetes therapy

A team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Massachusetts General Hospital report that the antioxident naringenin seems to mimic the actions of other drugs including the anti-diabetic rosiglitazone.

08/24/2010: Cognitive behavior therapy improves symptom control in adult ADHD

Adding cognitive behavioral therapy – an approach that teaches skills for handling life challenges and revising negative thought patterns – to pharmaceutical treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder significantly improved symptom control in adult patients.

08/18/2010: Lung cancer patients receiving palliative care had improved quality of life, extended survival

Integrating palliative care early in the treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer not only improved their mood and quality of life, it also extended their lives.

08/12/2010: Merlin protein found to control liver stem cells, prevent tumor development

A protein known to be involved in a rare hereditary cancer syndrome may have a role in the regulation of liver stem cells and the development of liver cancer.

08/09/2010: Brain rhythm predicts ability to sleep through a noisy night

People who have trouble sleeping in noisy environments often resort to strategies like earplugs or noise-canceling headphones that muffle the sound, but a new study from MGH investigators may lead to ways to block disturbing sounds within the brain.

08/04/2010: Sorting out the genetic and biological links between cholesterol and coronary heart disease

Two papers in the current issue of Nature describe 95 gene variations that contribute to cholesterol and triglyceride levels and reveal the unexpected role of a metabolic pathway in lipid metabolism.

08/04/2010: New drug shown safe, effective in treating hereditary angioedema

Clinical trials from two international research teams have shown that icatibant, a new drug that blocks the action of an inflammatory protein known as bradykinin, is safe and effective in treating acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, a potentially life-threatening condition.

08/04/2010: MicroRNA molecule increases number of blood stem cells, may help improve cancer treatment

MGH investigators have identified a new mechanism that controls the number of the stem cells that give rise to all blood and immune system cells, an advance that may improve treatment of blood system cancers.

07/29/2010: Resting brain activity associated with spontaneous fibromyalgia pain

A recent study from researchers at Mass. General and University of Michigan provides the first direct evidence of linkage between elevated intrinsic (resting-state) brain connectivity and spontaneous pain intensity in patients with fibromyalgia.

07/27/2010: CTC screening for colorectal cancer not cost-effective when reimbursed at same rate as colonoscopy

Computed tomographic colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, is not cost-effective if reimbursed at the same rate as colonoscopy, according to a study from the Institute for Technology Assessment at MGH.

07/19/2010: Reprogrammed cells 'remember,' retain characteristics of their cells of origin

Investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine have confirmed that induced pluripotent stem cells retain some characteristics of the cells from which they were derived, something that could both assist and impede potential clinical and research uses.

07/15/2010: Largest study of genomes and cancer treatments releases first results

The largest study to correlate genetics with response to cancer drugs releases its first results today. The researchers behind the study, based at the MGH Cancer Center and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, describe the responses of 350 cancer samples to 18 anticancer therapeutics.

07/15/2010: Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's ranked on U.S. News National Honor Roll

Massachusetts General Hospital ranks third on the U.S. News & World Report annual 2010-11 Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals.

07/14/2010: Researchers Identify Possible New Treatment for Severe Vasculitis

Investigators have made a major advance in treating people with a rare but devastating disease of blood vessels.

07/13/2010: Many physicians do not accept responsibility to report incompetent, impaired colleagues

More than one-third of surveyed U.S. physicians did not agree that physicians should always report colleagues who are incompetent or impaired by conditions such as substance abuse or mental health disorders. Many also felt unprepared to report or otherwise deal with impaired or incompetent colleagues.

07/09/2010: Universal HIV testing and immediate treatment could reduce but not eliminate HIV/AIDS epidemic

Implementing universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral treatment for infected individuals could have a major impact on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Washington, DC but not halt the epidemic, which a previous report had projected.

07/05/2010: Study finds higher STD rates among users of erectile dysfunction drugs

An analysis of insurance records of more than 1.4 million U.S. men over 40 found that those who used ED drugs were more likely to have sexually transmitted diseases than were non-users.

06/30/2010: When food intake stops, enzyme turns off production of fats, cholesterol

MGH investigators have found that an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism also helps to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol under conditions of fasting. The findings could lead to new approaches to treating conditions involving elevated cholesterol and lipid levels.

06/28/2010: Mass. General Hospital, Iacocca Foundation announce completion of Phase I diabetes trial

MGH and the Iacocca Foundation announce today the completion of the Phase I BCG clinical trial in type 1 diabetes, as well as the submission of all safety reports to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the MGH data safety monitoring boards.

06/28/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches iPhone App to Locate Emergency Rooms

FindER uses the iPhone’s global positioning system to quickly direct patients to emergency rooms anywhere within the United States.

06/23/2010: Radiology Offers Opposing Views on Mammography Guidelines

The July issue of Radiology contains an editorial by MGH radiologist Daniel B. Kopans, MD, challenging the recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for mammography screening and asserting that the task force ignored important scientific evidence when making its recommendations.

06/16/2010: Puffing in public housing poses serious health risks to tenants

In an effort to protect children from harmful tobacco smoke exposure, health and medical professionals are pushing for a ban on smoking in public housing in a report appearing in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine.

06/16/2010: Defects in immune system enzyme may increase risk of autoimmune disorders

A multi-institutional research team has found that rare variants in the gene coding an enzyme that controls the activity of a key immune cell occur more frequently in individuals with autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

06/15/2010: Combined BRAF-targeted and immunotherapy shows promise for melanoma treatment

Combined targeted therapy against the BRAF/MAPK pathway with immunotherapy shows promise as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of melanoma, according to results of a preclinical study by MGH researchers.

06/14/2010: Study finds heart and circulation ultrasound can better determine heart disease risk in obese women

Researchers found that heart and circulation ultrasounds are an important tool in assessing the risk of heart disease in women who are obese or have metabolic syndrome.

06/14/2010: Novel ultrasound technique can help doctors detect heart muscle damage in chemotherapy patients

Mass General researchers unveiled a non-invasive ultrasound technique to help detect heart muscle damage in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

06/13/2010: Mass. General researchers develop functional, transplantable rat liver grafts

A team led by researchers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a technique that someday may allow growth of transplantable replacement livers.

06/09/2010: Heart Attacks Declined 24 Percent in Kaiser Permanente Northern California Since 2000

Heart attacks declined by 24 percent within a large, ethnically diverse, community-based population since 2000, and the relative incidence of serious heart attacks that do permanent damage declined by 62 percent, according to a study in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

06/09/2010: Genome-wide study identifies factors that may affect vitamin D levels

An international research consortium has identified four common gene variants that are associated with blood levels of vitamin D and with an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency.

06/08/2010: New type of human stem cell may be more easy to manipulate

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine and Harvard Stem Cell Institute have a developed a new type of human pluripotent stem cell that can be manipulated more readily than currently available stem cells. The new cells could be used as better disease models and eventually to repair disease-associated mutations.

06/03/2010: Study finds epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells

A detailed analysis of the epigenetics – factors controlling when and where genes are expressed – of Wilms tumor reveals striking similarities to stem cells normally found in fetal kidneys. These findings by MGH Cancer Center researchers reveal new cellular pathways critical for Wilms tumor development that may apply to other pediatric cancers.

05/26/2010: Study finds “law-like” patterns in human preference behavior

In a study appearing in the journal PLoS ONE, MGH scientists describe finding mathematical patterns underlying the way individuals unconsciously distribute their preferences regarding approaching or avoiding objects in their environment.

05/26/2010: Detailed metabolic profile gives "chemical snapshot" of the effects of exercise

Using a system that analyzes blood samples with unprecedented detail, a team led by MGH researchers has developed the first "chemical snapshot" of the metabolic effects of exercise.

05/25/2010: Simple Change Results in Fewer Unnecessary Imaging Exams for Patients

A new rule preventing medical support staff from completing orders for outpatient imaging exams that were likely to be negative resulted in a marked decrease in low-yield exams for patients, according to a study appearing in the June issue of Radiology.

05/21/2010: Over 2000 Runners Cross Home Plate this Sunday

Fans Race to Help Wounded Veterans at Fenway Park in Run to Home Base presented by New Balance

05/17/2010: New study characterizes cognitive and anatomic differences in Alzheimer’s disease gene carriers

In the most comprehensive study to date, neurologists have clearly identified significant differences in the ways that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects patients with and without the apolipoprotein E ε4 gene, a known genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disease.

05/14/2010: Homeless adults have significant unmet health care needs

The vast majority of homeless adults surveyed in a national study had trouble accessing at least one type of needed health care service in the preceding year, according to what may be the first broad-based national study of factors related to unmet health needs among homeless people.

05/13/2010: MicroRNA and host gene play key role in regulating cholesterol pathways

MGH researchers have identified tiny segments of RNA that may play an important role in the body's regulation of cholesterol and lipids.

05/11/2010: Many pregnant women not getting enough Vitamin D

Seven out of every ten pregnant women in the United States are not getting enough Vitamin D according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado Denver and MGH.

05/10/2010: Studies document risks associated with common acid-suppressing medications

Proton pump inhibitors, medications that suppress acid in the stomach, appear to be associated with fractures in postmenopausal women and bacterial infections in many patients.

05/05/2010: New insights into the mystery of natural HIV immunity

Researchers from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard discover how a genetic factor increases the immune system's ability to control HIV.

05/03/2010: Are poor workspace ergonomics causing radiologists pain?

A lack of attention to workspace ergonomics could be to blame for radiologists' musculoskeletal symptoms, including lower back pain, wrist pain, shoulder pain, neck pain, and headaches, according to a study to be presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society 2010 Annual Meeting.

04/27/2010: Long-term anabolic steroid use may weaken heart more than previously thought

Long-term anabolic steroid use may weaken the heart more than previously thought and may increase the risk of heart failure, according to a study led by MGH investigator Aaron Baggish, MD.

04/26/2010: Patients, clinicians favor disclosure of financial ties to industry

MGH investigator Eric Campbell comments on study finding that patients, research participants and journal readers believe financial relationships between medicine and industry should be disclosed.

04/25/2010: Gene silencing may be responsible for induced pluripotent stem cells' limitations

Investigators from the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have found that an important cluster of genes is inactivated in induced pluripotent stem cells — cells generated from adult tissue that have many characteristics of embryonic stem cells — that do not have the full development potential of embryonic stem cells.

04/19/2010: Patients with acne may get electronic follow-up care

Follow-up visits conducted via a secure Web site may result in similar clinical outcomes as in-person visits among patients with acne, according to a report from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

04/18/2010: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cancer Detection and Treatment: What’s On the Horizon

Cancer is a multifaceted disease that requires multiple approaches to diagnosis and management. At the American Association for Cancer Research 101st Annual Meeting 2010, scientists and clinicians will present more than 6,300 abstracts dealing with innovative aspects of biology, technology and emerging therapies.

04/14/2010: Novel artificial pancreas successfully controls blood sugar more than 24 hours

An artificial pancreas system that closely mimics the body's blood sugar control mechanism was able to maintain near-normal glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia in a small group of patients.

04/06/2010: Electronic health record alone may have limited ability to improve quality, costs of care

The implementation of electronic health record systems may not be enough to significantly improve health quality and reduce costs.

04/01/2010: Treatment resistance in some cancer cells may be reversible

The ability of cancer cells to resist treatment with either targeted drug therapies or traditional chemotherapy may, in some cases, result from a transient state of reversible drug "tolerance."

03/31/2010: Improved device provides more rapid, comprehensive analysis of circulating tumor cells

Technical improvements to a microchip-based device for detecting and analyzing tumor cells in the bloodstream are revealing cellular differences that may reflect a tumor's aggressiveness and long-term response to treatment.

03/31/2010: Even highly qualified women in academic medicine paid less than equally qualified men

Women conducting research in the life sciences continue to receive lower levels of compensation than their male counterparts, even at the upper levels of academic and professional accomplishment, according to a study conducted by the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital.

03/25/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital to create international registry for coronary optical coherence tomography

Mass General researchers are spearheading an international effort to study optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging technology that could help doctors identify the vulnerable coronary plaques that cause heart attacks.

03/22/2010: Blacks less likely than whites, Hispanics to get evidence-based stroke care

Blacks hospitalized with the most common type of stroke are less likely than white or Hispanic patients to receive evidence-based stroke care, according to a new study in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

03/21/2010: "Good" cells can go "bad" in a "bad neighborhood"

A new study by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital indicates that “good” cells can become cancerous because of exposure to a “bad” environment within the body — similarly to the way a “good boy” may turn to crime when exposed to the pressures of life in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

03/16/2010: Increased radiation dose does not increase long-term side effects for prostate cancer patients

Boosting the radiation dose given to prostate cancer patients to a level that cut recurrence in half did not increase the severity of side effects reported by patients up to a decade later. Patients also found the impact of continuing side effects on their quality of life to be less bothersome than would be expected, based on earlier studies.

03/02/2010: Alzheimer's-associated protein may be part of the innate immune system

Amyloid-beta protein – the primary constituent of the plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients – may be part of the body's first-line system to defend against infection. In their report in the March 3 issue of PLoS One, a team led by MGH researchers describe their evidence that amyloid-beta protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

03/02/2010: Mass. General Researchers Seek Participants for Parkinson’s Disease Clinical Trial

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are seeking recently diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to participate in a clinical trial investigating whether inosine taken to raise the body’s level of urate — a naturally occurring antioxidant — can be used to slow the progress of PD.

03/01/2010: Adding ECG to health exams may prevent sudden cardiac death in young athletes

A new study by researchers at the MGH Heart Center found the addition of electrocardiogram testing to the standard medical history and physical examination for young athletes may better identify key cardiovascular abnormalities responsible for sports-related sudden death.

03/01/2010: Different fat types can help or hinder obese girls' bone health

According to a new study accepted for publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, obese teenage girls with a greater ratio of visceral fat (fat around internal organs) to subcutaneous fat (fat found just beneath the skin) are likely to have lower bone density than peers with a lower ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat.

02/25/2010: Proton beam therapy shows encouraging long-term outcome for patients with locally advanced sinonasal cancers

Proton beam radiation therapy shows encouraging results for patients with locally advanced sinonasal malignancies, according to a study led by Annie Chan, MD, a radiation oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital.

02/23/2010: Study Should Prove Helpful in Quest for Safer, More Effective Blood Substitutes

A study published in the March 2010 issue of the journal Anesthesiology gives researchers new insights in how to better understand and control a severe side effect of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, often referred to as "artificial blood."

02/23/2010: Combined Mammography and Breast MRI Useful for Some High-Risk Women

Annual breast cancer screening with both mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is likely to be a cost-effective way to improve life expectancy in women with an increased risk of breast cancer.

02/21/2010: Common gene variant may increase risk for a type of cardiac arrhythmia

An international research team has identified a common gene variant associated with a form of the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that is seen in younger individuals with no other heart disease.

02/16/2010: A Race Like No Other - Fans Race in Honor of Veterans

This May, some 3,500 Red Sox fans will be able to know the thrill of running across home plate at America’s Most Beloved Ballpark, while at the same time raising funds to support services for local veterans with deployment-related stress disorders and traumatic brain injuries.

02/16/2010: Rates of childhood obesity, chronic health problems increase, but conditions may not persist

A new study confirms that rates of obesity and other chronic health problems have risen in American children in recent years, but it also shows that many children's conditions will improve or resolve over time.

02/14/2010: Shifting cellular energy metabolism may help treat cardiovascular disease

Drugs that target the way cells convert nutrients into energy could offer new approaches to treating a range of conditions including heart attack and stroke. Using a new way to screen for potential drugs, a team of researchers has identified several FDA-approved agents that can shift cellular energy metabolism processes in animals.

02/05/2010: Study finds screening for spinal muscular atrophy not cost effective

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, researchers will unveil findings that show it is not cost effective to screen for spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality and the second most common inherited autosomal recessive disorder.

02/04/2010: Dr. Michael R. Jaff invited to chair a California health task force

Dr. Michael R. Jaff named chairman and moderator of a task force aimed at increasing awareness of peripheral artery disease.

02/01/2010: Children more likely to visit the dentist if their parents do too

Whether or not children receive regular dental care is strongly associated with their parents' history of seeking dental care. A new report to appear in the journal Pediatrics, which has been released online, is the first to analyze the relationship between parents' and childrens' dental visits in a nationally represntative sample.

01/28/2010: Attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous meetings may reduce depression symptoms

One of many reasons that attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings helps people with alcohol use disorders stay sober appears to be alleviation of depression. A team of researchers has found that study participants who attended AA meetings more frequently had fewer symptoms of depression – along with less drinking – than did those with less AA participation.

01/27/2010: Workers' Compensation Patients Get Less Benefit from Back Surgery

Surgery provides better results than nonsurgical treatment for most patients with back pain related to a herniated disk - but not for those receiving workers' compensation for work-related injuries, according to a study in the journal Spine.

01/27/2010: Biochemical profile may help diagnose, determine aggressiveness of prostate cancer

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy – which analyzes the biochemistry rather than the structure of tissues – may someday be able both to pinpoint the precise location of prostate cancer and to determine the tumor's aggressiveness, information that could help guide treatment planning.

01/21/2010: Lack of cellular enzyme triggers switch in glucose processing

A study investigating how a cellular enzyme affects blood glucose levels in mice provides clues to pathways that may be involved in processes including the regulation of longevity and the proliferation of tumor cells.

01/19/2010: Combination therapy may benefit patients with specific genetic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer

Even when their tumors are shrinking in response to therapy, some non-small cell lung cancer patients have a scattering of cancer cells that are undeterred by the drug, causing the tumor to resume its growth.

01/17/2010: New gene variants associated with glucose, insulin levels, some with diabetes risk

A major international study with leadership from MGH researchers has identified 10 new gene variants associated with blood sugar or insulin levels. Two of these novel variants and three that earlier studies associated with glucose levels were also found to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

01/13/2010: Words used to describe substance-use patients can alter attitudes, contribute to stigma

Changing the words used to describe someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction may significantly alter the attitudes of health care professionals, even those who specialize in addiction treatment.

01/07/2010: Study finds increased presence, severity of coronary artery plaques in HIV-infected men

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found that relatively young men with longstanding HIV infection and minimal cardiac risk factors had significantly more coronary atherosclerotic plaques - some involving serious arterial blockage - than did uninfected men with similar cardiovascular risk.

01/05/2010: ICER Report Suggests Similar Levels of Effectiveness among Management and Treatment Options for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

A comprehensive appraisal of the management and treatment options for low-risk prostate cancer found that the rates of survival and tumor recurrence are similar among the most common treatment approaches, although costs can vary considerably.

12/17/2009: Scientists discover natural flu-fighting protein in human cells

Researchers have identified a small family of flu-fighting proteins that somehow increases natural resistance to viral infection. The proteins block most virus particles from infecting the cell at the earliest stage in the virus lifecycle.

12/16/2009: New Web Tool May Help Predict Risk of Second Stroke

Scientists have developed a new web-based tool that may better predict whether a person will suffer a second stroke within 90 days of a first stroke.

12/15/2009: Smaller is Better for Finger Sensitivity

People who have smaller fingers have a finer sense of touch, according to new research in the Dec. 16 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This finding explains why women tend to have better tactile acuity than men, because women on average have smaller fingers.

12/14/2009: Study finds increased risk of death, stroke in postmenopausal women taking antidepressants

Women participating in the Women's Health Initiative study who reported taking an antidepressant drug had a small but statistically significant increase in the risk of stroke and of death compared with participants not taking antidepressants.

12/14/2009: Connecting the Dots

A team of researchers led by Daniel Haber, MD, PhD, director of the MGH Cancer Center, recently announced that they have revealed a unique molecular mechanism that might control the growth of cancer cells.

12/08/2009: Possible ovarian cancer treatment target identified

A multi-institutional study has identified a potential personalized treatment target for the most common form of ovarian cancer.

12/02/2009: Videos can help cancer patients choose level of care they prefer

Patients with terminal brain cancer who watched a brief video illustrating options for end-of-life care were significantly more likely to indicate a preference for comfort measures only than were patients who listened to a verbal description of treatment choices.

11/13/2009: Nicotine vaccine to be tested at Massachusetts General Hospital

People tackling the daunting task of trying to quit smoking could find help through a novel approach being tested at MGH.

11/09/2009: Discussing adverse events with patients improves how they rate their hospital care

A survey of patients had who experienced some sort of adverse event during their hospitalization found that, although caregivers discussed the event with patients less than half the time, those patients to whom the adverse event had been disclosed rated the quality of their care higher than did patients whose caregivers did not address the problem.

11/06/2009: Psychiatric impact of torture could be amplified by head injury

Depression and other emotional symptoms in survivors of torture and other traumatic experiences may be exacerbated by the effects of head injuries, according to a study from the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma, based at Massachusetts General Hospital.

11/03/2009: Industry support of academic life science research may be declining

While more than half the academic life science researchers responding to a 2007 survey indicated having some relationship with industrial entities, the prevalence of such relationships – particularly direct funding for research studies – appears to be dropping.

10/28/2009: A Decade Later, Lifestyle Changes or Metformin Still Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Intensive lifestyle changes aimed at modest weight loss reduced the rate of developing type 2 diabetes by 34 percent compared with placebo in people at high risk for the disease, researchers conclude based on 10 years of data.

10/21/2009: Sexual problems rarely addressed by internists caring for cancer survivors

More than half the internists responding to a survey indicated they rarely or never discussed sexual problems with their patients who had survived cancer.

10/19/2009: Clots traveling from lower veins may not be the cause of pulmonary embolism in trauma patients

A report from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital physicians calls into question the longstanding belief that pulmonary embolism – the life-threatening blockage of a major blood vessel in the lungs – is caused in trauma patients by a blood clot traveling from vessels deep within the legs or lower torso.

10/15/2009: From stem cells to functioning strip of heart muscle

A team of Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital and collaborators at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has taken a giant step toward the possibility of using human stem cells to repair damaged hearts.

10/12/2009: Study supports possible role of urate in slowing Parkinson’s disease progression

By examining data from a 20-year-old clinical trial, a research team based at the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Harvard School of Public Health, has found evidence supporting the findings of their 2008 study – that elevated levels of the antioxidant urate may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

10/08/2009: NHLBI supports consortium exploring stem-cell-based tools and treatments

Two teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, also members of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, are among 18 groups receiving National Heart Lung and Blood Institute grants for the development of stem-cell based tools and treatments to understand and treat cardiovascular and blood disorders. The Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium will consist of nine research hubs, each involving multidiscplinary teams from two academic medical centers.

10/07/2009: Genome-wide study of autism published in Nature

In one of the first studies of its kind, an international team of researchers has uncovered a single-letter change in the genetic code that is associated with autism.

10/05/2009: Jack W. Szostak, PhD – 2009 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine

Prestigious prize honors Mass General scientist for role in discovery of telomerase, enzyme that protects chromosome tips

09/21/2009: Vitamin D and Elderly Health

A new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Denver and Massachusetts General Hospital shows vitamin D plays a vital role in reducing the risk of death associated with older age.

09/17/2009: Red Sox Foundation, Mass General Team Up to Help Veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq Wars

The Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital today will announce a multifaceted initiative aimed at helping veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who are affected by post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

09/15/2009: Comprehensive cardiac CT scan may give clearer picture of significant heart disease

A team of researchers led by Massachusetts General Hospital radiologists has developed a computed-tomography-based protocol that identifies both narrowing of coronary arteries and areas of myocardial ischemia - restricted blood flow to heart muscle tissue - giving a better indication of clinically significant coronary artery disease.

09/11/2009: David Ortiz Committed to Helping Critically Ill Children

The Red Sox great is officially partnering his David Ortiz Children’s Fund with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to serve critically ill children in New England and the northeast.

09/09/2009: MassGeneral Hospital for Children study explains some mysteries of neonatal seizures

A study led by MassGeneral Hospital for Children investigators is providing new insight into the mechanism of neonatal seizures, which have features very different from seizures in older children and adults.

09/04/2009: Cardiac biomarker levels strongly predict outcome of bypass surgery

Levels of a biomarker used in the diagnosis of heart attacks are almost universally elevated in patients who have undergone coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) and, when markedly elevated, powerfully predict the risk of complications.

09/03/2009: Large-scale study probes how cells fight pathogens

Scientists have deciphered a key molecular circuit that enables the body to distinguish viruses from bacteria and other microbes, providing a deep view of how immune cells in mammals fend off different pathogens. The research offers a practical approach for unraveling the circuits that underpin other important biological systems.

09/02/2009: A breath of fresh air could improve drug toxicity screening

A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers has developed an innovative way to culture liver cells for drug toxicity screening.

09/01/2009: New assessment quantifies risks and benefits of warfarin treatment for atrial fibrillation

Warfarin therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation - the most common type of significant heart rhythm disorder - appears to be most beneficial for the oldest patients, those who have had a prior stroke and for patients with multiple risk factors for stroke.

09/01/2009: New report describes types of research conducted at academic medical centers

A study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Health Policy gives the first detailed look at the types of research currently being conducted within U.S. academic medical centers - medical schools and their affiliated hospitals.

08/27/2009: Blood thinner causes stroke in some dialysis patients

The blood thinner warfarin can prevent strokes in most individuals with abnormal heart rhythms but may have the opposite effect in kidney disease patients on dialysis, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology.

08/24/2009: Twitter and health care - can a tweet a day keep the doctor away?

Twitter, the increasingly popular social networking tool that was at first merely a convenient way to stay in touch with friends and family, is emerging as a potentially valuable means of real-time, health care communication.

08/14/2009: NIH renews Harvard Center for AIDS Research grant for another five years

The National Institutes of Health has renewed for five years - and $18.1 million - the funding for the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (Harvard CFAR). Harvard is one of only 20 NIH CFAR sites in the U.S. and first received the designation in 2004.

08/11/2009: Denosumab increases bone density, cuts fracture risk in prostate cancer survivors

Twice-yearly treatment with denosumab, a new targeted therapy to stop bone loss, increased bone density and prevented spinal fractures in men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

08/11/2009: Postdiagnosis aspirin use reduces risk of dying from colorectal cancer

Regular use of aspirin after colorectal cancer diagnosis may reduce the risk of cancer death, report investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

07/30/2009: Unexpected reservoir of monocytes discovered in the spleen

Mass. General researchers discovered an unexpected reservoir of the immune cells called monocytes in the spleen and showed that these cells are essential to recovery of cardiac tissue in an animal heart attack model.

07/27/2009: Intensive Glucose Control Halves Complications of Longstanding Type 1 Diabetes

Near-normal control of glucose beginning as soon as possible after diagnosis would greatly improve the long-term prognosis of type 1 diabetes, concludes a study published in the July 27, 2009, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, which updates information about the clinical course of type 1 diabetes.

07/22/2009: Mass. General-based research center will investigate why immune system fails to control hepatitis C

A research consortium based at Massachusetts General Hospital has been awarded $15 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate how the hepatitis C virus resists suppression and clearance by the immune system.

07/22/2009: Recovery Act Funding Supports 23 Fellowships for Early Career Scientists

Mass. General investigator Joseph Tucker, MD, is among recipients of NIH Early Career Scientist fellowships.

07/20/2009: Study suggests earlier HIV antiviral treatment saves lives and is cost effective, even in areas of limited resources

Early initiation of lifesaving antiretroviral therapies should be the standard of care for all HIV-infected patients, even those in countries with limited medical and financial resources, according to a study led by researchers at MGH and the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, South Africa.

07/15/2009: MGH study identifies first molecular steps to childhood leukemia

A Massachusetts General Hospital-based research team has identified how a chromosomal abnormality known to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia – the most common cancer in children – initiates the disease process.

07/13/2009: Differences in immune response may explain why HIV-1 disease progresses faster in women than in men with same viral load

A research team based at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has found a gender-based difference in the response of a first-line immune cell to HIV that may explain why the infection usually progresses faster in women than in men with the same viral loads.

07/08/2009: Antiangiogenesis treatment improves hearing in some NF2 patients

Treatment with the angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab improved hearing and alleviated other symptoms in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). The study by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) represents the first report of a successful NF2 treatment not involving surgery or radiation.

07/01/2009: Human cardiac master stem cells identified

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified the earliest master human heart stem cell from human embryonic stem cells - ISL1+ progenitors - that give rise to a family of cells that form the essential portions of the human heart.

07/01/2009: Large study strongly supports many common genetic contributions to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder

An international research consortium has discovered that many common genetic variants contribute to a person’s risk of schizophrenia and are also involved in bipolar disorder.

06/30/2009: Study provides greater understanding of Lyme disease-causing bacteria

A new study finds that a particular strain of the bacteria that causes Lyme disease may be more virulent, leading to increased inflammation in joints that persists after antibiotic treatment.

06/30/2009: Biomarkers’ ability to improve prediction of cardiovascular risk is modest

Measurement of known biomarkers of cardiovascular disease slightly improves the ability to predict future heart attack or stroke in healthy individuals, but not enough to change preventive therapies.

06/23/2009: Common ECG finding may indicate serious cardiac problems

A common electrocardiogram finding that has largely been considered insignificant may actually signal an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, the future need for a permanent pacemaker and an increased risk for premature death.

06/23/2009: Biomarkers Predict Brain Tumor’s Response to Therapy

A report in Cancer Research highlights a new biomarker that may be useful in identifying patients with recurrent glioblastoma who would respond better to antiangiogenesis therapy.

06/22/2009: Intensive in-hospital support doubles likelihood of smoking cessation in heart patients

Patients admitted to hospital with coronary artery disease are twice as likely to quit smoking after receiving intensive smoking cessation support compared to minimal support.

06/11/2009: Depression Medications May Reduce Male Fertility

As many as half of all men taking the antidepressant medication paroxetine (trade names Seroxat, Paxil) may have increased sperm DNA fragmentation — a predictor of compromised fertility. The study also found that the changes are reversible with normal levels of sperm returning after discontinuation of the drug.

06/10/2009: Brain-computer interface begins new clinical trial for paralysis

Scientists at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have initiated the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial to expand restorative neurotechnology research for some patients with paralysis.

06/07/2009: Recruitment of reproductive features into other cell types may underlie extended lifespan in animals

MGH researchers have found that certain genetic mutations known to extend the lifespan of the C. elegans roundworm induce 'mortal' somatic cells to express some of the genes that allow the 'immortality' of reproductive germline cells.

06/02/2009: Joren C. Madsen inducted as president of American Transplantation Society

Joren C. Madsen, MD, D.Phil, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center, was inducted president of the American Society of Transplantation during the 2009 American Transplant Congress.

06/01/2009: Hitting where it hurts

A new study uncovers a gene expression signature that reliably identifies cancer cells whose survival is dependent on a common signaling pathway, even when the cells contain multiple other genetic abnormalities. The study from MGH Cancer Center researchers identifies critical molecular vulnerabilities, thereby revealing promising therapeutic targets for a common and notoriously treatment resistant cancer.

05/28/2009: Video can help patients make end-of-life decision

Viewing a video showing a patient with advanced dementia interacting with family and caregivers may help elderly patients plan for end-of-life care, according to a study led by MGH researchers.

05/26/2009: Mass. General’s Rudy Tanzi a “Rock Star of Science”

Alzheimer’s disease researcher Rudolph Tanzi, PhD, of Massachusetts General Hospital adds another distinction to his scientific career when he joins Aerosmith’s Joe Perry and other rock celebrities in a designer menswear photo shoot as a “Rock Star of Science” in the June issue of GQ Magazine.

05/21/2009: Automated analysis of MR images may identify early Alzheimer’s disease

Analyzing MRI studies of the brain with software developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Mass. General Hospital may allow diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and of mild cognitive impairment, a lesser form of dementia that precedes the development of Alzheimer's by several years.

05/21/2009: Genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk may be greatly underutilized

Although a test for gene mutations known to significantly increase the risk of hereditary breast or ovarian cancer has been available for more than a decade, a new study finds that few women with family histories of these cancers are even discussing genetic testing with their physicians or other health care providers.

05/19/2009: Study suggests TB screening needs to be targeted for maximum public health benefit

New estimates of the likelihood that a latent case of tuberculosis will become active have resulted in a roughly 50 percent increase over previous estimates of the number of people needed to be screened to prevent an active infection.

05/18/2009: Study examines trends in gallbladder cancer over 4 decades

Overall prognosis for gallbladder cancer appears to be improving, although many patients still have incurable disease and poor survival rates.

05/15/2009: Study finds virtual doctors visits satisfactory for both patients and clinicians

Someday, even doctor visits could be among the conveniences offered via the Internet. In a comparison of desktop videoconferencing to conventional face-to-face general medical evaluations, patients found virtual visits similar to face-to-face visits on most measures. This study suggests that both patients and physicians could benefit if virtual visits were used as an alternative method of accessing primary care services.

05/12/2009: Enriched environment improves wound healing in rats

Improving the environment in which rats are reared can significantly strengthen the physiological process of wound healing, according to a report in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. MGH researchers found that giving rats living in isolation the opportunity to build nests led to faster and more complete healing of burn injuries.

05/10/2009: International study identifies potential treatment targets for hypertension

Scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), as part of a major international research collaboration, have associated common variants in eight regions of DNA with blood pressure levels in human patients. Six of the identified regions have not previously been implicated in blood pressure regulation.

05/08/2009: Videoconferencing can increase patient access to stroke specialists

High-quality videoconferencing can increase patient access to stroke specialists; and a transient ischemic attack, once known as a “mini” or “warning” stroke, should be treated with the same urgency as a full-blown stroke, according to two separate statements published today in Stroke.

04/29/2009: Researchers Develop New Technique For Modifying Plant Genes

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Massachusetts General Hospital have used a genome engineering tool they developed to make a model crop plant herbicide-resistant without significant changes to its DNA.

04/23/2009: Non-invasive test accurately identifies gynecologic malignancies

Diffusion weighted MR can accurately identify benign from malignant pelvic lymph nodes in patients with gynecologic malignancy, according to an MGH study.

04/06/2009: Simple bedside test improves diagnosis of chronic back pain, could guide treatment

A simple and inexpensive method of assessing pain, developed by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, is better than currently used techniques for distinguishing neuropathic pain – pain caused by damage to the nervous system – from other types of chronic back pain.

04/03/2009: Model tissue system reveals cellular communication via amino acids

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine has found the first evidence of cell-to-cell communication by amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, rather than by known protein signaling agents such as growth factors or cytokines.

04/02/2009: Modification of mutant huntingtin protein increases its clearance from brain cells

A new study has identified a potential strategy for removing the abnormal protein that causes Huntington’s disease from brain cells, which could slow the progression of the devastating neurological disorder.

03/30/2009: Intestinal parasites alter immunity in cholera patients

Results of the study from a collaborative team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh suggest that parasitic infection could reduce the immune response to cholera, which may compromise the effectiveness of cholera vaccines.

03/30/2009: Angiogenesis inhibitor improves brain tumor survival by reducing edema

The beneficial effects of anti-angiogenesis drugs in the treatment of the deadly brain tumors called glioblastomas appear to result primarily from reduction of edema – the swelling of brain tissue – and not from any direct anti-tumor effect.

03/26/2009: HHMI Gives 50 Early Career Scientists a Jump on Their Next Big Idea

Two MGH investigators – Bradley E. Bernstein, MD, PhD, and Konrad Hochedlinger, PhD – are among 50 receipients of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist Awards.

03/25/2009: Policies regarding IRB members’ industry relationships often lacking

At a time of heightened concern about conflicts of interest posed by relationships between academic medical researchers and commercial firms, a new study finds that a significant number of academic institutions do not have clear policies covering the industrial relationships of members of Institutional Review Boards, committees charged with ensuring that clinical studies uphold patient rights and follow ethical guidelines.

03/25/2009: Intensive summer program helps physicians build clinical research careers

Graduates of the Program in Clinical Effectiveness, which has trained almost 1,900 physicians to be clinical investigators since 1986, have achieved significant success in receiving grant support from the National Institutes of Health and other funders, along with other accomplishments considered key to establishing a research career.

03/23/2009: Common gene variants influence risk factor for sudden cardiac death

A new study has identified several common genetic variants related to a risk factor for sudden cardiac death. The report receiving early online release in the journal Nature Genetics identifies variants in genes, some known and some newly discovered, that influence the QT interval measured on the electrocardiogram (EKG) performed routinely in doctors’ offices.

03/20/2009: HHS Names David Blumenthal as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology

The Department of Health and Human Services today announced the selection of David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P. as the Obama Administration’s choice for National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.

03/19/2009: New Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV Research Created in South Africa

A groundbreaking partnership between the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa will establish an international research center focused on the worldwide effort to control the devastating co-epidemic of tuberculosis and HIV.

03/18/2009: Study identifies human genes required for hepatitis C viral replication

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers are investigating a new way to block reproduction of the hepatitis C virus – targeting not the virus itself but the human genes the virus exploits in its life cycle.

03/06/2009: Both Latino and non-Latino women likely to accept HPV vaccination for selves and children

Most women responding to a survey conducted at MGH clinics indicated they would be willing to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus and to have their daughters and even sons vaccinated in order to prevent cancer in their children. The report also found that Latino women are just as likely, if not more so, to accept HPV vaccine as non-Latinos.

03/02/2009: Patient-Physician "Connectedness" Affects Quality of Care

A new study finds that patients who are connected to a specific primary care physician are more likely to receive guideline-consistent care than those who are connected to a practice but not a physician.

02/26/2009: International collaboration identifies new gene associated with ALS

A collaborative research effort spanning nearly a decade between researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and King’s College London has identified a novel gene for inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease).

02/26/2009: Alzheimer’s-associated plaques may have impact throughout the brain

The impact of the amyloid plaques that appear in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease may extend beyond the deposits’ effects on neurons– the cells that transmit electrochemical signals throughout the nervous system.

02/25/2009: HIV is evolving to evade human immune responses

HIV is evolving rapidly to escape the human immune system, an international study has shown. The findings demonstrate the challenge of developing an HIV vaccine that keeps pace with the changing nature of the virus.

02/23/2009: Vitamin D deficiency may increase risk of colds, flu

Vitamin D may be an important way to arm the immune system against disorders like the common cold, report investigators from the University of Colorado Denver (UC Denver) School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Children’s Hospital Boston.

02/18/2009: A Compass for Navigating the Mental Health Journey in Troubled Times

Although many people affected by the economic downturn could benefit from mental health treatment and services, two factors typically discourage them from seeking help: the stigma often associated with mental health conditions, and the feeling of not knowing how to find the right mental health care providers, information, and services. A web site (www.moodandanxiety.org) recently re-launched by Massachusetts General Hospital’s Department of Psychiatry addresses both of these issues.

02/15/2009: Common gene variants increase risk of hypertension, finding may lead to new therapies

A new study has identified the first common gene variants associated with an increased incidence of hypertension – a significant risk factor for heart attack, stroke and kidney failure.

02/09/2009: Stroke Therapy Window Might Be Extended Past Nine Hours for Some

Some patients who suffer a stroke as a result of a blockage in an artery in the brain may benefit from a clot-busting drug nine or more hours after the onset of symptoms.

02/08/2009: International study identifies gene variants associated with early heart attack

The largest study ever completed of genetic factors associated with heart attacks has identified nine genetic regions - three not previously described - that appear to increase the risk for early-onset myocardial infarction.

01/29/2009: MGH Cancer Center now offers pencil-beam proton therapy treatment

The MGH Cancer Center has added pencil-beam scanning to the radiation therapy modalities offered at the hospital’s Burr Proton Therapy Center.

01/19/2009: Virtual communities may provide valuable support for psoriasis patients

Online support communities appear to offer both a valuable educational resource and a source of psychological and social support for individuals with psoriasis, according to a report from the Center for Connected Health at Partners HealthCare System.

01/14/2009: Hospital pilot sites demonstrate surgical safety checklist drops deaths and complications by more than one third

A group of hospitals in eight cities around the globe has successfully demonstrated that the use of a simple surgical checklist during major operations can lower the incidence of deaths and complications by more than one third.

01/14/2009: New model system may better explain regulation of body weight

A new mathematical model of the physiological regulation of body weight suggests a potential mechanism underlying the difficulty of losing weight, one that includes aspects of two competing hypotheses of weight regulation.

01/05/2009: Nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord sense pain caused by physical insult

Mass. General researchers and the colleagues add to understanding of the role of the protein COX2 in pain associated with inflammation.

12/17/2008: Researchers compile ‘molecular manual’ for hundreds of inherited diseases

An international research team has compiled the first catalogue of tissue-specific pathologies underlying hundreds of inherited diseases.

12/17/2008: Supply of board-certified emergency physicians unlikely to meet projected needs

The number of physicians with board certification in emergency medicine is unlikely to meet the staffing needs of U.S. emergency departments in the foreseeable future, if ever; according to a study from a research team based at Massachusetts General Hospital

12/10/2008: Hormone therapy for prostate cancer does not appear to increase cardiac deaths

Treating prostate cancer patients with drugs that block hormonal activity does not appear to increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a study led by MGH researchers

12/09/2008: Research team explores causes of death on Mount Everest

In the first detailed analysis of deaths during expeditions to the summit of Mt. Everest, a research team led by MGH investigators has conducted found that most deaths occur during descents from the summit in the so-called “death zone” above 8,000 meters and identified factors associated with a greater risk of death.

12/05/2008: Some blood-system stem cells reproduce more slowly than expected

MGH investigators have found a subpopulation of hematopoietic stem cells, the source of all blood and immune system cells, that reproduce much more slowly than previously anticipated. Use of these slow-cycling cells may improve the outcome of stem-cell transplants for the treatment of leukemia and other bone-marrow-based diseases.

12/03/2008: Robotic Technology Improves Stroke Rehabilitation

MGH scientists have used a novel, hand-operated robotic device and functional MRI to track the rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients, showing that the brain can continue to regain function even six months or more after a stroke.

11/30/2008: Combining targeted therapy drugs may treat previously resistant tumors

A team of cancer researchers from several Boston academic medical centers has discovered a potential treatment for tumors driven by mutations in the K-Ras gene, which have resisted previous targeted therapy approaches.

11/30/2008: Discoveries May Help Scientists Understand Why Disease Turns Soft Tissue Into Bone

Scientists have created a new mouse model that may help researchers explain how a rare disease causes otherwise supple soft tissue and joints to turn into bone.

11/24/2008: Sealing off portion of intestinal lining treats obesity, resolves diabetes in animal model

Lining the upper portion of the small intestine with an impermeable sleeve led to both weight loss and restoration of normal glucose metabolism in an animal model of obesity-induced diabetes.

11/19/2008: Genetic screening no better than traditional risk factors for predicting type 2 diabetes

Screening for a panel of gene variants associated with the risk for type 2 diabetes can identify adults at risk for the disorder but is not significantly better than assessment based on traditional risk factors.

11/17/2008: Great story here

brief description of what the story is

11/17/2008: Technology gives three-dimensional view of human coronary arteries

For the first time researchers are getting a detailed look at the interior of human coronary arteries, using an optical imaging technique developed at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.

11/16/2008: Tiny sacs released by brain tumor cells carry information that may guide treatment

MGH researchers have found that tiny membrane-covered sacs released from glioblastoma cells contain molecules that may help guide treatment of the deadly brain tumor.

11/12/2008: Common anesthetic induces Alzheimer’s-associated changes in mouse brains

For the first time researchers have shown that a commonly used anesthetic can produce changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of living mammals, confirming previous laboratory studies.

11/07/2008: Interaction between gene variants may alter brain function in schizophrenia

A collaborative study led by investigators from MGH is giving what may be the first look at how interactions between genes underlie a key symptom of schizophrenia, impaired working memory.

10/31/2008: While prevalent, sexual problems in women not always associated with distress

The largest such study ever published finds that, while about 40 percent of women surveyed report having sexual problems, only 12 percent indicate that those issues are a source of significant personal distress

10/30/2008: Gene scan of Alzheimer’s families identifies four new suspect genes

The first family-based genome-wide association study in Alzheimer’s disease has identified the sites of four novel genes that may significantly influence risk for the most common late-onset form of the devastating neurological disorder.

10/27/2008: Meta-analysis examines cardiovascular effects of diabetes medications

The diabetes medication metformin may be associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis of previously published studies in the October 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

10/21/2008: ADHD appears to increase level of nicotine dependence in smokers

Young people with ADHD are not only at increased risk of starting to smoke cigarettes, they also tend to become more seriously addicted to tobacco and more vulnerable to environmental factors such as having friends or parents who smoke.

10/16/2008: Gene therapy restores vision to mice with retinal degeneration

MGH researchers have used gene therapy to restore useful vision to mice with degeneration of the light-sensing retinal rods and cones, a common cause of human blindness.

10/13/2008: Intensive support programs can help hospitalized smokers stay smoke-free

Hospital-sponsored stop-smoking programs for inpatients that include follow-up counseling for longer than one month significantly improve patients’ ability to stay smoke-free.

10/08/2008: Study finds abnormalities in cerebral cortex of cocaine addicts

A brain imaging study carried out at MGH reveals abnormalities in the cerebral cortex – the outer surface of the brain – of cocaine addicts that appear to correlate with dysfunction in areas responsible for attention and for reward-based decision-making.

10/06/2008: ADHD stimulant treatment may decrease risk of substance abuse in adolescent girls

MGH researchers have found that treatment with stimulant drugs does not increase and appears to significantly decrease the risk that girls with ADHD will begin smoking cigarettes or using alcohol or drugs.

10/01/2008: New Questions Raised About Lung Cancer Screening

In response to new concerns about a study supporting the use of CT screening to detect early-stage lung cancer in smokers and other people at risk, the Editor-in-Chief of "The Oncologist" has called for an independent audit of the research data.

10/01/2008: Thompson Reuters Predicts the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Since 1989, Thomson Reuters has developed a list of likely winners in medicine, chemistry, physics, and economics. Those chosen are named Thomson Reuters Scientific Laureates.

09/30/2008: Extra copies of EGFR gene signal poor prognosis for vulvar cancer

MGH researchers report that women with vulvar carcinoma whose tumors have extra copies of the EGFR gene are at increased risk of dying from their cancer, information that could indentify patients who should be treated with targeted therapy drugs.

09/25/2008: New approach to gene therapy may shrink brain tumors, prevent their spread

MGH researchers are investigating a new approach to gene therapy for brain tumors – delivering a cancer-fighting gene to normal brain tissue around the tumor to keep it from spreading.

09/23/2008: Hospital residents report patient-handoff problems common, can lead to patient harm

A significant percentage of resident physicians report that patient handoffs – transfer of responsibility for a hospitalized patient from one resident to another – contributed to incidents in which harm was done to patients.

09/22/2008: NIH extends commitment to transformative research with 2008 Pioneer, New Innovator Awards

The National Institutes of Health announced today that it has increased its support of high-impact research with 2008 NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards to 47 scientists, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers.

09/22/2008: Proton therapy lowers chance of later cancers

Treating cancer patients with proton therapy instead of standard photon radiation decreases the risk of developing a secondary cancer by two-fold

09/22/2008: Study confirms benefit of combination therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

Treatment with Alzheimer’s disease drugs can significantly slow the rate at which the disorder advances, and therapy with two different classes of drugs is even better at helping patients maintain their ability to perform daily activities.

09/19/2008: Cathy E. Minehan elected chair of the MGH Board of Trustees

Cathy E. Minehan, managing director of Arlington Advisory Partners, today was named chair of the Massachusetts General Hospital Board of Trustees, succeeding Edward P. Lawrence, Esq.

09/18/2008: More than skin deep

There may be no such thing as a 'safe' tan based on ultraviolet (UV) radiation, according to a series of papers published in the October issue of Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research.

09/16/2008: Mixed Results for Personal Health Record System

An online personal health record system that allowed people with diabetes to check their lab results and get guidance about medication proved to be of only limited use in improving their health outcomes, researchers found.

09/13/2008: MGH researcher Gary Ruvkun named a co-recipient of the Lasker Award

MGH investigator Gary Ruvkun, PhD, is one of three co-recipients of the 2008 Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. The scientists are being honored for discovering that tiny molecules of RNA can control the activity of critical genes in animals and plants.

09/10/2008: Mass. General’s Warren Triennial Prize honors discoverers of microRNAs

Two investigators who helped to uncover a previously unsuspected world of tiny RNA molecules will be recognized next month by Massachusetts General Hospital with its highest award for research.

09/09/2008: Advanced blood analysis may speed diagnosis of heart attacks

Someday doctors may be able to use a blood test to confirm within minutes, instead of hours, if a patient is having a heart attack, allowing more rapid treatment that could limit damage to heart muscle.

08/28/2008: Risk of fracture is significantly higher in HIV-infected patients

As antiviral treatment for HIV infection allows patients to live longer, many will be confronted with additional health challenges. A new study shows for the first time that one of these may be significantly increased risk of bone fractures.

08/25/2008: Potential diabetes treatment selectively kills autoimmune cells from human patients

In experiments using blood cells from human patients with diabetes and other autoimmune disorders, MGH researchers have confirmed the mechanism behind a potential new therapy for type 1 diabetes

08/20/2008: Bone marrow stem cells may help control inflammatory bowel disease

MGH investigators have found that infusions of a particular bone marrow stem cell appeared to protect gastrointestinal tissue from autoimmune attack in a mouse model.

08/19/2008: Obese prostate cancer patients may benefit more from brachytherapy

Brachytherapy, also called seed implants, may be a more beneficial treatment than surgery or external beam radiation therapy for overweight or obese prostate cancer patients.

08/19/2008: Prostate Cancer Foundation Commits $4.3 Million to Young Investigators

The Prostate Cancer Foundation today announced 19 Young Investigators Awards for 2008.

08/18/2008: Largest Study of Its Kind Implicates Gene Abnormalities in Bipolar Disorder

The largest genetic analysis of its kind to date for bipolar disorder has implicated machinery involved in the balance of sodium and calcium in brain cells.

08/18/2008: Expanding the exam room

In the first study of its kind, researchers find both patients and physicians react positively to real-time, virtual check-ups using videoconferencing technology.

08/07/2008: Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers create 20 disease-specific stem cell lines

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researcher George Q. Daley, has with HSCI colleagues Chad Cowan and Konrad Hochedlinger of Massachusetts General Hospital produced a robust new collection of disease-specific stem cell lines, all of which were developed using the new induced pluripotent stem cell technique.

08/06/2008: Study finds connections between genetics, brain activity and preference

A team of MGH researchers has used brain imaging, genetics and experimental psychology techniques to identify a connection between brain reward circuitry, a behavioral measurement of preference and a gene variant that appears to influence both.

08/06/2008: Hormone level may reflect mortality risk among dialysis patients

A new study suggests that monitoring levels of a hormone called fibroblast growth factor 23 may provide information crucial to the treatment of patients with kidney failure.

08/03/2008: Growth hormone reduces abdominal fat, cardiovascular risk factors in HIV patients on antiviral therapy

Low-dose growth hormone treatment reduced abdominal fat deposits and improved blood pressure and triglyceride levels but also appeared to increase blood sugar levels in a group of patients with HIV lipodystrophy.

08/01/2008: Pediatricians Help Parents CEASE Smoking

The, Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure (CEASE) program aims to teach pediatricians to help parents quit smoking and establish and enforce no-smoking rules in the home and car.

07/30/2008: MGH receives $8.5 million grant from Schwartz Foundation to expand HIV/AIDS work in Africa

MGH today announced plans to greatly expand its HIV/AIDS clinical and research efforts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa – often considered the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic – and establish a state-of-the-art academic and research facility in Uganda.

07/30/2008: MGH study shows how amyloid plaques may damage brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Using an advanced imaging technique that reveals how brain cells are functioning, researchers from the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease have found that levels of intracellular calcium are significantly elevated in neurons close to plaques in the brains of an Alzheimer’s mouse model.

07/30/2008: Large study uncovers surprisingly diverse genome alterations that contribute to schizophrenia

A multinational group of investigators has discovered that people suffering from schizophrenia are far more likely to carry rare chromosomal structural changes of all types, particularly those that have the potential to alter gene function.

07/24/2008: Consortium develops new method enabling routine targeted gene modification

A multi-institutional team led by MGH investigators has developed a powerful new tool for genomic research and medicine – a robust method for generating synthetic enzymes that can target particular DNA sequences for inactivation or repair.

07/21/2008: Viral recombination another way HIV fools the immune system

When individuals infected with HIV become infected with a second strain of the virus, the two viral strains can exchange genetic information, creating a third, recombinant strain of the virus. Now a study from the Partners AIDS Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital shows that how and where viral strains swap DNA may be determined by the immune response against the original infecting strain.

07/14/2008: Patient reports can add to efforts to identify, reduce adverse events in hospitals

A study by a group of Massachusetts researchers finds that surveying patients about their experiences can add important information to hospital efforts to improve patient safety.

07/10/2008: Middle Eastern families yield intriguing clues to autism

Research has implicated a half-dozen new genes in autism and strongly supports the idea that autism stems from disruptions in the brain's ability to form new connections in response to experience.

07/02/2008: Circulating tumor cells can reveal genetic signature of dangerous lung cancers

An MGH-developed, microchip-based device that detects and analyzes tumor cells in the bloodstream can be used to determine the genetic signature of lung tumors, facilitating targeted therapies and monitoring genetic changes that occur during therapy.

07/01/2008: CIMIT Names Recipients of Young Clinician Research Awards

CIMIT is pleased to announce that six bright and promising medical professionals have been named recipients of the Young Clinician Award for 2008.

07/01/2008: Depression Ups Risk of Complications Following Heart Attack

People who suffer from severe depression following a heart attack might be more likely to experience cardiac complications while hospitalized, according to a new study.

07/01/2008: Relaxation response can influence expression of stress-related genes

A new study finds that eliciting the relaxation response – a physiologic state of deep rest – influences the activation patterns of genes associated with the body’s response to stress.

06/29/2008: International team identifies 21 new genetic risk factors for Crohn’s disease

An international consortium of Crohn’s disease researchers has combined data from three independent studies to identify 21 new genetic variants associated with the inflammatory bowel disorder, bringing the total number of risk factors to 32.

06/20/2008: Cardiovascular risk assessment, treatment vital for HIV patients on therapy

Antiretroviral medications have dramatically reduced the overall death rate among patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but those same patients may now face an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

06/18/2008: Physician Adoption of Electronic Health Records Still Extremely Low, But Medicine May be at a Tipping Point

Despite the promises it offers health care and quality improvement, only a small minority of U.S. physicians have embraced electronic health records (EHR) as a routine part of practice, says a study in the June 19 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

06/16/2008: Hormone disorder may contribute to lack of menstruation in teenage athletes

Researchers from MGH have found a way to predict which teenage female athletes will stop menstruating, an important risk factor for bone thinning, according to a preliminary study.

06/10/2008: CT Lung Cancer Screening No Cure-All for Smokers

Screening for lung cancer with computed tomography (CT) may help reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, but it won't protect them from other causes of death associated with smoking.

06/04/2008: Simple membranes could have allowed nutrients to pass into primitive cells

An MGH research team has found that the sort of very simple membrane that may have been present on primitive cells can easily allow small molecules – including the building blocks of RNA and DNA – to pass thorough.

06/02/2008: NARSAD Researchers Identify Specific Genes and Family Traits Linked to Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder and Depression

New findings from research conducted by Harvard-affiliated scientists are providing important clues into how genes work to impair various aspects of attention, memory and perception -- the behaviors associated with many psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.

06/02/2008: Report confirms increased risk of smoking, substance abuse in bipolar adolescents

An MGH study - the largest and first controlled such investigation - supports previous reports that adolescents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for smoking and substance abuse.

09/03/2014: Digital mammography system developed at Mass. General Hospital receives FDA approval

A digital mammography system developed based on concepts originally tested at MGH has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

08/12/2014: Grants announced for Building a Healthier Charlestown

Massachusetts General Hospital’s Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI) and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital recently announced the distribution of $118,628 in grant funding through Building a Healthier Charlestown to two Charlestown collaboratives.

07/01/2014: MGH ARCH Program Partners with the John F. Kennedy Family Center

For more than a decade, the MGH ARCH Program has partnered with organizations in the community to meet their needs for high-quality health information and resources. There have been eight projects since 2000.

05/28/2014: Massachusetts General Hospital and CBS Cares collaborate to encourage safe sex among sexually active senior citizens.

As STD rates for seniors soar, a new PSA campaign encourages children and grandchildren to discuss safe sex with their single parents and grandparents.

03/28/2014: EAST BOSTON RESIDENTS ASKED TO COMPLETE QUALITY OF LIFE SURVEY FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ASSESSMENT

East Boston residents have a chance to improve their community by completing the East Boston Quality of Life Survey. Residents are urged to complete the survey to describe the most important health issues that affect East Boston residents today. All answers are anonymous.

01/15/2014: Mass. General, Broad Institute and Amgen Will Work to Discover New Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Massachusetts General Hospital, the Broad Institute, and Amgen announced today that they have launched a strategic collaboration to jointly discover and validate new therapeutic targets and develop novel therapies for inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic disorder that affects millions worldwide.

11/19/2013: Gift supports MGH drug development, patient and family support for rare and deadly tumor

New program to create a more hopeful and supportive future for patients with the rare cancer mesothelioma.

10/31/2013: Legal Initiative For Children (LINC) celebrates 10 years at MGH

Many immigrant and refugee families come to Chelsea from poor countries torn by civil war. They are war-weary and wary of authority figures. Many do not know that they have the right to complain about unsanitary rental apartments and the right to appeal from denial of public benefits. Thanks to a medical-legal partnership funded by the MGH Center for Community Health Improvement, these families can get help exercising those rights.

10/07/2013: Incentive program helps Mass. General's physicians organization reach quality-improvement goals

A program offering modest financial incentives to salaried Massachusetts General Hospital-affiliated physicians who achieve specific quality improvement targets has helped the organization meet goals related to the adoption of electronic health technology, improved quality and efficiency, and communication with patients and other providers.

09/18/2013: Appalachian Mountain Club and MGHfC Team Up to Help Families Live a Healthier Lifestyle

The Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) and MassGeneral Hospital for Children have joined forces to launch “Outdoors Rx,” an innovative new AMC program that gives healthcare professionals the dedicated resources for prescribing regular outdoor physical activity to children.

09/16/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital offers specialized operation to remove chronic blood clots from pulmonary arteries

Massachusetts General Hospital offers pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE), a highly specialized operation to remove chronic blood clots in the lungs. Without surgery, patients who have this life-threatening disease will likely develop progressive shortness of breath so severe that it leads to heart failure.

08/02/2013: FDA Sets New Food Safety Regulations for Gluten-Free Foods

The FDA has released its definition of "gluten free" to be used by food manufacturers. The long-awaited regulations stem from research conducted by the Center for Celiac Research.

07/01/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital combines two minimally invasive procedures to treat atrial fibrillation

A new clinical trial is now underway at the Massachusetts General Hospital to investigate whether combining two endovascular catheter-based procedures will improve the long-term outcome in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. Mass General is the first hospital in New England – and only the second in the nation – to pair renal artery sympathetic denervation with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension.

05/13/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital Receives Highest Nursing Credential With Prestigious Magnet® Recognition … Again

The Massachusetts General Hospital has again attained Magnet® recognition as part of the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. This voluntary credentialing program for hospitals recognizes excellence in nursing. This credential is the highest honor an organization can receive for professional nursing practice.

03/20/2013: Mass General receives top honor for stroke patients’ quality of care

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has received a top honor from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) for its commitment to improving its quality of care to stroke patients. The “2013 Stroke Collaborative Reaching for Excellence (SCORE) Defect-Free Care Award” recognizes the MGH for providing defect-free care to more than 80 percent of patients admitted with stroke over the course of a year

01/24/2013: Center for Celiac Research Joins MassGeneral Hospital for Children

The Center for Celiac Research, under the leadership of Alessio Fasano, MD, has moved from Baltimore to Massachusetts General Hospital for Children (MGHfC) in Boston.

11/19/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches Online National Emergency Room Locator

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) announced the launch of EDMaps.org, a national emergency room locator which provides the most accurate and up-to-date information on emergency departments in the United States.

11/12/2012: Smoking parents often expose children to tobacco smoke in their cars

MassGeneral Hospital for Children study suggests that parents may not recognize the dangers of smoking in their cars with a child present.

10/23/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches Angelman Syndrome Clinic

The Angelman Syndrome Clinic, one of only two in the country, will work to reduce the frequency and severity of Angelman syndrome symptoms, particularly seizures, and to develop dietary regimens for individuals that further assist in the reduction of symptoms.

08/01/2012: Mass. General and MassGeneral Hospital for Children launch new Down syndrome program

New Down syndrome program offers multiple clinics each week tailored to meet the unique medical and psychosocial needs of patients of all ages.

07/31/2012: MGH First & Only Hospital in New England to Offer LINX Procedure for Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

New, less invasive treatment using a flexible bracelet of magnetic beads may bring relief with fewer side effects than traditional surgery

07/17/2012: Massachusetts General Hospital Ranked #1 in the Nation on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Massachusetts General Hospital has moved into the number one spot on the 2012-13 U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Hospitals” list.

06/06/2012: Analysis tracks how health care value has changed over 200 years

An analysis of records from the 200-year history of Massachusetts General Hospital reveals trends in the value of health care since the early 19th century.

06/04/2012: Mass General Hospital Opens New Sports Performance Center

This state-of-the-art facility combines the most advanced 3-D biomechanical imaging technology with the clinical expertise of Massachusetts General Hospital.

05/16/2012: The "2012 Run-Walk to Home Base Presented By New Balance" At Fenway Takes Place This Sunday

The "2012 Run-Walk to Home Base Presented By New Balance"starts and ends at Fenway Park, with a timed finish at the iconic Green Monster and “photo finish” crossing home plate.

03/30/2012: First Patient Treated in New England in Ventana U.S. Clinical Trial

Vascular surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) treated the first patient in New England in the Ventana U.S. Clinical Trial last week. MGH is one of 25 sites in the U.S. chosen to participate in this prospective, multicenter research study approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Ventana™ Fenestrated System for the endovascular repair of juxtarenal (JAA) and pararenal (PAA) aortic aneurysms.

02/06/2012: Supporting the Mental Health of Veterans and Families

A series of 14 free, live, on-line trainings for primary care, VA, community mental health, and other providers begins Thursday, February 23, 2012.

12/10/2011: Run to Home Base Presented by New Balance Adds a Walk Option for 2012 Event; Fenway Park’s Famed Home Plate is Finish Line in May

3rd Annual Run-Walk benefits Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans and Families Affected by Combat Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury

10/27/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital: 2011 Winner of American Association of Medical Colleges’Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service

The Association of American Medical Colleges, representing medical schools and teaching hospitals and health systems, has awarded MGH its 2011 Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service. (Scroll down for video).

09/20/2011: Christopher J. McDougle named director of the Lurie Center for Autism

Christopher J. McDougle, MD has been named director of the Lurie Center for Autism at Massachusetts General Hospital and MassGeneral Hospital for Children.

07/15/2011: New guide helps doctors identify signs of trouble in military families

New tool is designed to help pediatricians and other clinicians identify and address the signs of deployment-related stress among children and families.

07/14/2011: Mass. General Hospital to Deploy Staff to Haiti in Response to Rising Cholera Cases

On Sunday, July 17, The MGH Center for Global Health will deploy 6 clinicians to Hospital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles, Haiti, in response to resurging cases of cholera.

07/08/2011: Red Sox Foundation and Mass General Hospital Home Base Program wins national grant from McCormick Foundation and Major League Baseball to expand services

A $1.1 million competitive national grant from the McCormick Foundation and Major League Baseball will be used to support the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program to expand access to care for veterans with traumatic brain injury or combat stress and support services for their families.

06/30/2011: Mass General Imaging brings 3D mammography to Worcester

Mass General Imaging - Worcester now introduces 3D mammography technology that promises to improve breast cancer detection.

06/20/2011: Mental Health of Returning Veterans is Focus of 3rd Annual Boston Conference

Many of the nation’s top experts in mental health care for veterans gather in Boston to assist community-based healthcare professionals to effectively identify and treat returning veterans who suffer from psychological and physical wounds of deployment.

06/20/2011: Free Conference for Clergy and Spiritual Leaders Focuses on Mental Health of Returning Veterans Affected by Combat Stress

Clergy members and spiritual leaders of all denominations are invited to attend an innovative symposium that focuses on understanding and guiding the recovery of veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as their families.

06/17/2011: The Wonder of Lunder

Celebrating 200 years of medical innovation and advancement, Massachusetts General Hospital designates June 20-24, 2011, Lunder Dedication Week, to highlight the opening of the new 14-floor building that will expand clinical space at the heart of the main campus.

06/14/2011: Ride for our Heroes

New England-area motorcycle enthusiasts are kick starting their bikes and riding in the first Ride for Our Heroes on Saturday September 24. Ride for Our Heroes supports the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program’s services for veterans and families affected by combat stress and traumatic brain injury.

06/01/2011: Physicians Call For New Approach To Address National “Epidemic Of Mass Incarceration”

The authors of a New England Journal of Medicine Perspective article link the U.S. “epidemic of mass incarceration” to inadequate treatment of addiction and mental illness.

05/12/2011: African Americans and the General Public Support Banning Menthol in Cigarettes

According to a new study released online today, a majority of Americans, including most African Americans, stand together in support of banning menthol in cigarettes just as other cigarette flavorings have now been banned by the FDA.

04/04/2011: Special Military Discount and New Fundraising Prizes Announced for the 2011 Run to Home Base

In addition to crossing home plate, runners will be able to win terrific prizes including Green Monster tickets, New Balance gift cards and autographed Red Sox jerseys.

03/18/2011: Mass General publishes book outlining 200 years of medical care and progress

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) today celebrates the launch of its new history book, Something in the Ether: A Bicentennial History of Massachusetts General Hospital, 1811-2011, by local author Webster Bull and his daughter, Martha Bull. The 527-page hardcover volume commemorates 200 years of medicine, capturing the spirit of the nation’s third oldest general hospital as conveyed through work of some of the most captivating, colorful and inspiring characters in health care, past and present.

12/29/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital celebrates 200 years in 2011

January 1, 2011, marks the start on Mass General's bicentennial anniversary. Find out how the hospital is celebrating this momentous milestone.

12/22/2010: A Run Like No Other: Fenway Park’s Famed Home Plate is Finish Line for “2011 Run to Home Base Presented by New Balance” on Sunday, May 22, 2011

Thousands of fans who participate in the annual run will be able to experience the thrill of crossing home plate at Fenway Park while raising funds to support clinical treatment for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

12/16/2010: Mass. General Hospital's Warren Triennial Prize to honor pioneers of cellular reprogramming

The 2011 Warren Triennial Prize – the top scientific award presented by the MGH – will be awarded to Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, and Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, pioneers in developing methods to reprogram adult cells into pluripotent cells with the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells.

11/30/2010: Dr. Peter Slavin to chair AAMC council of teaching hospitals administrative board

MGH President Peter L. Slavin appointed chair of a council representing the interests of major teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada.

11/18/2010: ICER Launches RAPiD Initiative through Formation of New England Healthcare Advisory Council

With backing from a consortium of New England state health policy leaders, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review - the based at the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment - will spearhead the formation of a New England Healthcare Advisory Council to provide objective, independent guidance on the application of medical evidence to clinical practice and payer policy decisions across New England.

11/11/2010: MassGeneral Hospital for Children celebrates 10 years of excellence in pediatrics

MGH celebrates 100 years of comprehensive pediatric services, 50 years of pediatric surgery, and a decade as Mass General Hospital for Children.

11/08/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health to Host Inaugural Symposium

Broadening the Response: The Role of Academic Medical Centers in Global Health, will bring together the foremost global health leaders and policy makers to discuss how best to build, strengthen and expand on global partnerships.

10/18/2010: EACH and ICER Launch Prostate Cancer Decision Aid Website

The Employers Action Coalition on Healthcare and the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, part of the Massachusetts General Hospital’s Institute for Technology Assessment, are launching a new website designed to give patients recently diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer objective information about treatment choices.

10/15/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital launches $1.5 billion fundraising campaign

Massachusetts General Hospital today formally launched the largest fundraising campaign in its history and the most ambitious capital campaign ever among health care institutions in New England.

10/15/2010: Health care education collaboration builds on relationships between Maine health care providers, patients and Massachusetts General Hospital

A new educational collaboration between Maine and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) seeks to expand the range of health care education programs, materials and opportunities available to providers, patients, families and veterans throughout the state of Maine.

09/27/2010: The Patriots Aim to Kick Cancer

Nearly 70,000 fans pack the stands at Gillette Stadium for every Patriots home game and, statistically, far too many of them will develop cancer in their lifetimes. With support from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital – the founding hospitals of Partners HealthCare – and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation has launched Kick Cancer, a season-long initiative to increase cancer awareness among Patriots fans.

07/15/2010: Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women's ranked on U.S. News National Honor Roll

Massachusetts General Hospital ranks third on the U.S. News & World Report annual 2010-11 Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals.

06/28/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital Launches iPhone App to Locate Emergency Rooms

FindER uses the iPhone’s global positioning system to quickly direct patients to emergency rooms anywhere within the United States.

06/16/2010: Puffing in public housing poses serious health risks to tenants

In an effort to protect children from harmful tobacco smoke exposure, health and medical professionals are pushing for a ban on smoking in public housing in a report appearing in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine.

05/21/2010: Over 2000 Runners Cross Home Plate this Sunday

Fans Race to Help Wounded Veterans at Fenway Park in Run to Home Base presented by New Balance

02/16/2010: A Race Like No Other - Fans Race in Honor of Veterans

This May, some 3,500 Red Sox fans will be able to know the thrill of running across home plate at America’s Most Beloved Ballpark, while at the same time raising funds to support services for local veterans with deployment-related stress disorders and traumatic brain injuries.

02/04/2010: Dr. Michael R. Jaff invited to chair a California health task force

Dr. Michael R. Jaff named chairman and moderator of a task force aimed at increasing awareness of peripheral artery disease.

10/05/2009: Jack W. Szostak, PhD – 2009 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine

Prestigious prize honors Mass General scientist for role in discovery of telomerase, enzyme that protects chromosome tips

09/17/2009: Red Sox Foundation, Mass General Team Up to Help Veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq Wars

The Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital today will announce a multifaceted initiative aimed at helping veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq who are affected by post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

09/11/2009: David Ortiz Committed to Helping Critically Ill Children

The Red Sox great is officially partnering his David Ortiz Children’s Fund with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to serve critically ill children in New England and the northeast.

06/02/2009: Joren C. Madsen inducted as president of American Transplantation Society

Joren C. Madsen, MD, D.Phil, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Transplant Center, was inducted president of the American Society of Transplantation during the 2009 American Transplant Congress.

03/20/2009: HHS Names David Blumenthal as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology

The Department of Health and Human Services today announced the selection of David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P. as the Obama Administration’s choice for National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.

02/18/2009: A Compass for Navigating the Mental Health Journey in Troubled Times

Although many people affected by the economic downturn could benefit from mental health treatment and services, two factors typically discourage them from seeking help: the stigma often associated with mental health conditions, and the feeling of not knowing how to find the right mental health care providers, information, and services. A web site (www.moodandanxiety.org) recently re-launched by Massachusetts General Hospital’s Department of Psychiatry addresses both of these issues.

10/06/2008: ADHD stimulant treatment may decrease risk of substance abuse in adolescent girls

MGH researchers have found that treatment with stimulant drugs does not increase and appears to significantly decrease the risk that girls with ADHD will begin smoking cigarettes or using alcohol or drugs.

09/19/2008: Cathy E. Minehan elected chair of the MGH Board of Trustees

Cathy E. Minehan, managing director of Arlington Advisory Partners, today was named chair of the Massachusetts General Hospital Board of Trustees, succeeding Edward P. Lawrence, Esq.

09/16/2008: Mixed Results for Personal Health Record System

An online personal health record system that allowed people with diabetes to check their lab results and get guidance about medication proved to be of only limited use in improving their health outcomes, researchers found.

09/13/2008: MGH researcher Gary Ruvkun named a co-recipient of the Lasker Award

MGH investigator Gary Ruvkun, PhD, is one of three co-recipients of the 2008 Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research. The scientists are being honored for discovering that tiny molecules of RNA can control the activity of critical genes in animals and plants.

09/10/2008: Mass. General’s Warren Triennial Prize honors discoverers of microRNAs

Two investigators who helped to uncover a previously unsuspected world of tiny RNA molecules will be recognized next month by Massachusetts General Hospital with its highest award for research.

08/03/2008: Growth hormone reduces abdominal fat, cardiovascular risk factors in HIV patients on antiviral therapy

Low-dose growth hormone treatment reduced abdominal fat deposits and improved blood pressure and triglyceride levels but also appeared to increase blood sugar levels in a group of patients with HIV lipodystrophy.

08/01/2008: Pediatricians Help Parents CEASE Smoking

The, Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure (CEASE) program aims to teach pediatricians to help parents quit smoking and establish and enforce no-smoking rules in the home and car.

07/30/2008: MGH receives $8.5 million grant from Schwartz Foundation to expand HIV/AIDS work in Africa

MGH today announced plans to greatly expand its HIV/AIDS clinical and research efforts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa – often considered the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic – and establish a state-of-the-art academic and research facility in Uganda.

07/14/2008: Patient reports can add to efforts to identify, reduce adverse events in hospitals

A study by a group of Massachusetts researchers finds that surveying patients about their experiences can add important information to hospital efforts to improve patient safety.

07/01/2008: Depression Ups Risk of Complications Following Heart Attack

People who suffer from severe depression following a heart attack might be more likely to experience cardiac complications while hospitalized, according to a new study.

06/18/2008: Physician Adoption of Electronic Health Records Still Extremely Low, But Medicine May be at a Tipping Point

Despite the promises it offers health care and quality improvement, only a small minority of U.S. physicians have embraced electronic health records (EHR) as a routine part of practice, says a study in the June 19 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

09/03/2014: One Fund Center Launches in September to Offer Ongoing Care for those affected by the Marathon Bombings

The One Fund Boston, Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary today announced the creation of the One Fund Center, a collaboration that will offer ongoing care to those affected by the often invisible, yet persistent, injuries sustained in the Boston Marathon bombings.

09/21/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital Receives the Extracorproeal Life Support Organization Award for Excellence in Life Support

Massachusetts General Hospital has been designated as a Center of Excellence by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO), an international consortium of health care professionals and scientists who are dedicated to the development and evaluation of novel therapies for support of failing organ systems.

05/25/2011: Mass General Imaging leads charge to reduce CT radiation with launch of research center, publication of clinical protocols

First-of-its-kind Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation devoted to achieving the lowest radiation dose for every patient. Availability of CT exam protocols gives radiology practitioners worldwide access to more than a decade’s worth of clinical expertise on reducing radiation exposure

03/07/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital is first in the nation to do mammography screening using 3D breast tomosynthesis

The Breast Imaging Program at Massachusetts General Hospital today welcomes its first patient to undergo three-dimensional breast tomosynthesis screening. Also known as 3D mammography, this technology promises to improve cancer detection and reduce false positives.

12/02/2010: Patriots and Mass General Hospital to raise awareness for colorectal cancer at Monday night's game

As part of the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation's season-long "Kick Cancer" initiative, and in partnership with Mass General Hospital, the Patriots will promote colorectal cancer awareness at the December 6 Monday night matchup at Gillette Stadium versus the New York Jets.

08/31/2010: Driver's education for the brain teaches social and emotional competency in the classroom

The Massachusetts General Hospital School Psychiatry Program announces the creation of an educational curriculum to help teachers train their students' brains. Doctors say such efforts could curb bullying by helping students develop core social and emotional skills.

06/23/2010: Radiology Offers Opposing Views on Mammography Guidelines

The July issue of Radiology contains an editorial by MGH radiologist Daniel B. Kopans, MD, challenging the recent United States Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for mammography screening and asserting that the task force ignored important scientific evidence when making its recommendations.

01/29/2009: MGH Cancer Center now offers pencil-beam proton therapy treatment

The MGH Cancer Center has added pencil-beam scanning to the radiation therapy modalities offered at the hospital’s Burr Proton Therapy Center.

10/01/2008: New Questions Raised About Lung Cancer Screening

In response to new concerns about a study supporting the use of CT screening to detect early-stage lung cancer in smokers and other people at risk, the Editor-in-Chief of "The Oncologist" has called for an independent audit of the research data.

09/23/2008: Hospital residents report patient-handoff problems common, can lead to patient harm

A significant percentage of resident physicians report that patient handoffs – transfer of responsibility for a hospitalized patient from one resident to another – contributed to incidents in which harm was done to patients.

09/22/2008: Proton therapy lowers chance of later cancers

Treating cancer patients with proton therapy instead of standard photon radiation decreases the risk of developing a secondary cancer by two-fold

09/18/2008: More than skin deep

There may be no such thing as a 'safe' tan based on ultraviolet (UV) radiation, according to a series of papers published in the October issue of Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research.

08/18/2008: Expanding the exam room

In the first study of its kind, researchers find both patients and physicians react positively to real-time, virtual check-ups using videoconferencing technology.

07/01/2008: Relaxation response can influence expression of stress-related genes

A new study finds that eliciting the relaxation response – a physiologic state of deep rest – influences the activation patterns of genes associated with the body’s response to stress.

06/20/2008: Cardiovascular risk assessment, treatment vital for HIV patients on therapy

Antiretroviral medications have dramatically reduced the overall death rate among patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but those same patients may now face an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

06/16/2008: Hormone disorder may contribute to lack of menstruation in teenage athletes

Researchers from MGH have found a way to predict which teenage female athletes will stop menstruating, an important risk factor for bone thinning, according to a preliminary study.

06/10/2008: CT Lung Cancer Screening No Cure-All for Smokers

Screening for lung cancer with computed tomography (CT) may help reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, but it won't protect them from other causes of death associated with smoking.

10/17/2014: Study finds inconsistent achievement of guidelines for acute asthma care in hospital EDs

A study comparing the care delivered to patients coming to hospital emergency departments for acute asthma attacks in recent years with data gathered more than 15 years earlier finds that, while achievement of most guidelines defining appropriate pharmacologic treatments for particular patients improved, hospitals did less well in meeting several other guidelines.

10/15/2014: MGH and MIT form strategic partnership to address major challenges in clinical medicine

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases.

10/13/2014: Chemical present in broccoli, other vegetables may improve autism symptoms

A small study led by investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has found evidence that daily treatment with sulforaphane – a molecule found in foods such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage – may improve some symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

10/12/2014: Novel culture system replicates course of Alzheimer’s disease, confirms amyloid hypothesis

An innovative laboratory culture system has succeeded, for the first time, in reproducing the full course of events underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Using the system they developed, MGH investigators provide the first clear evidence supporting the hypothesis that deposition of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a cascade leading to the devastating neurodegenerative disease.

10/11/2014: Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant

A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent C. difficile infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube.

10/03/2014: Vitamin D supplements significantly improve symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis in children

A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema.

10/03/2014: Mass. General study suggests neurobiological basis of human-pet relationship

How closely does the relationship between people and their non-human companions mirror the parent-child relationship? A small study from a group of MGH researchers contributes to answering this complex question by investigating differences in how important brain structures are activated when women view images of their children and of their own dogs.

10/01/2014: Delayed introduction to gluten appears not to prevent celiac disease in at-risk infants

An study led by investigators at the MGHfC Center for Celiac Research and Treatment finds that neither breastfeeding nor delaying the introduction of gluten-containing foods prevents or delays the development of celiac disease in at-risk children.

10/01/2014: ‘Smart’ Bandage Emits Phosphorescent Glow for Healing Below

Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration.

09/27/2014: Crizotinib treatment effective against ROS1-positive lung cancer

Treatment with the targeted therapy drug crizotinib effectively halts the growth of lung tumors driven by rearrangements of the ROS1 gene

09/26/2014: Policies of NIH, other funders, have improved data-sharing by life-science investigators

Policies put into place by major funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health, and to a lesser extent by scientific journals, appear to be meeting the goal of increasing the sharing of scientific resources among life science investigators.

09/22/2014: Mass. General study reveals gene expression patterns in pancreatic circulating tumor cells

Analysis of circulating tumor cells in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of CTCs, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to the ability to generate metastases and prove to be targets for improved treatment of the deadly tumor.

09/16/2014: Point-of-care CD4 testing is economically feasible for HIV care in resource-limited areas

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, working in collaboration with colleagues in Mozambique and South Africa, indicates that routine point-of-care CD4 testing at the time of HIV diagnosis could be cost effective in countries where health care and other resources are severely limited.

09/11/2014: A non-toxic strategy to treat leukemia

A study comparing how blood stem cells and leukemia cells consume nutrients found that cancer cells are far less tolerant to shifts in their energy supply than their normal counterparts. The results suggest that there could be ways to target leukemia metabolism so that cancer cells die but other cell types are undisturbed.

09/02/2014: Cannabis withdrawal symptoms common among adolescents treated for substance use disorder

Although cannabis – commonly known as marijuana – is broadly believed to be nonaddictive, a study by MGH investigators found that 40 percent of cannabis-using adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for substance use disorder experienced symptoms of withdrawal, which are considered a hallmark of drug dependence.

08/28/2014: Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells

Circulating tumor cell clusters – clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream – appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the MGH Cancer Center.

08/26/2014: Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk

Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression.

08/19/2014: Repeat ED visits for acute heart failure suggest need for better outpatient care

Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments in Florida and California during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care.

08/19/2014: Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge

An MGH program described in the August 20 issue of JAMA increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent.

08/18/2014: Mass. General-developed device monitors key step in development of tumor metastases

A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a fundamental change in cellular characteristics that has been associated with the ability of tumor cells to migrate and invade other sites.

08/13/2014: Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models

An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death.

08/06/2014: Increased adoption of complex care management can help meet cost savings, quality goals

In a New England Journal of Medicine article and a issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund, two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians and their co-authors outline best practices in complex care management, discuss barriers to wider adoption of the approach and describe potential strategies to surmount those barriers.

07/31/2014: Innovative “genotype first” approach uncovers protective factor for heart disease

Extensive sequencing of DNA from thousands of individuals in Finland has unearthed scores of mutations that destroy gene function and are found at unusually high frequencies. Among these are two mutations in a gene called LPA that may reduce a person’s risk of heart disease.

07/28/2014: Stimulation of brain region restores consciousness to animals under general anesthesia

Stimulating one of two dopamine-producing regions in the brain was able to arouse animals receiving general anesthesia with either isoflurane or propofol.

07/28/2014: Non-endoscopic migraine surgery provides significant symptom relief in Mass. General patients

A revised version of a surgical procedure to treat severe chronic migraine headaches led to significant symptom relief more than 90 percent of the time in a group of patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital.

07/19/2014: Drug that reduces abdominal fat in HIV patients also may reduce fat in liver

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients.

07/10/2014: Cultured circulating tumor cells reveal genetic profile, potential drug susceptibility of breast cancer cells

Circulating tumor cells captured with a microchip-based device developed at the MGH Center for Engineering in Medicine and the MGH Cancer Center can be cultured to establish cell lines that accurately reflect a tumor’s genetic mutation over time and changing susceptibility to therapeutic drugs.

07/08/2014: Siblings may have a greater influence than parents on a child’s obesity risk

A new report led by an investigator at the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH finds that the risk associated with having an obese sibling is more than twice as great as that of having an obese parent and is even stronger among siblings of the same gender.

06/30/2014: Studies provide important new information on genetic risk of sudden cardiac death

Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with MGH and the Broad Institute, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias.

06/29/2014: Mass. General-developed protocol could greatly extend preservation of donor livers

A system developed by investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine allowed successful transplantation of rat livers after preservation for as long as four days, more than tripling the length of time organs currently can be preserved.

06/19/2014: UV-induced beta-endorphin production causes addiction-like symptoms in mice

A new study from MGH investigators adds important support to the theory that ultraviolet light can actually be addictive, finding that chronic UV exposure raises circulating levels of beta-endorphin in mice and that UV-habituated mice exhibit withdrawal symptoms if beta-endorphin activity is blocked.

06/18/2014: Broken gene found to protect against heart disease

By scouring the DNA of thousands of patients, researchers have discovered four rare gene mutations that not only lower the levels of triglycerides but also significantly reduce a person’s risk of coronary heart disease

06/15/2014: Bionic pancreas successfully controls blood sugar levels in adults, adolescents with type 1 diabetes

The latest version of a bionic pancreas device has been successfully tested in two five-day clinical trials – one in adults, the other in adolescents – that imposed minimal restrictions on patient activities.

06/11/2014: MGH/Ragon Institute study finds how protein blocks HIV life cycle in elite controllers

Investigators from MGH and the Ragon Institute have learned more about one way the immune systems of elite controllers – those rare individuals able to control HIV infection without drug treatment – block a key step in the virus’s life cycle.

06/10/2014: International team unearths strong genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Latin American populations

In the largest study of its kind published to date, an international team of researchers in Mexico and the United States has discovered a strong genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes that primarily affects Latin American patients, but is rare elsewhere.

05/29/2014: Activation of brain region can change a monkey's choice

Artificially stimulating a brain region believed to play a key role in learning, reward and motivation induced monkeys to change which of two images they choose to look at.

05/27/2014: MGH Announces Initiative to Develop Implantable Device to Treat PTSD and TBI

New research initiative is designed to treat PTSD TBI, and other neurological and psychiatric disorders.

05/27/2014: Skin grafts from genetically modified pigs may offer alternative for treatment of serious burns

A specially-bred strain of miniature swine lacking the molecule responsible for the rapid rejection of pig-to-primate organ transplants may provide a new source of skin grafts to treat seriously burned patients.

05/21/2014: Pulsed electrical fields destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria infecting burn injuries

Application of a technology currently used to disinfect food products may help to get around one of the most challenging problems in medicine today, the proliferation of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.

05/19/2014: Chronic insufficient sleep increases obesity, overall body fat in children

One of the most comprehensive studies of the potential link between reduced sleep and childhood obesity finds compelling evidence that children who consistently received less than the recommended hours of sleep during infancy and early childhood had increases in both obesity and in adiposity or overall body fat at age 7.

05/16/2014: Transgenic mice produce both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on carbohydrate diet

MGH investigators have developed a transgenic mouse that synthesizes both the omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids within its tissues on a diet of carbohydrates or saturated fats. Significant evidence suggest that the ratio of dietary omega-6 to omega-3 has important implications for human health.

05/16/2014: Herpes-loaded stem cells used to kill brain tumors

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have a potential solution for how to more effectively kill tumor cells using cancer-killing viruses.

05/09/2014: Study identifies mechanism by which intestinal enzyme maintains microbial balance

MGH investigators have identified the mechanism by which an enzyme produced in the intestinal lining helps to maintain a healthy population of gastrointestinal microbes.

05/06/2014: Donor livers preserved and improved with room-temperature perfusion system

A system developed by investigators at the MGH Center for Engineering in Medicine and the MGH Transplant Center has the potential to increase both the supply and the quality of donor organs for liver transplantation.

04/30/2014: In recognizing speech sounds, the brain does not work the way a computer does

How does the brain decide whether something is correct? When it comes to the processing of spoken language, the theory has been that the brain applies a set of rules to determine which combinations of sounds are permissible. Now the work of MGH investigators suggests that the brain decides based on the words that are already known.

04/25/2014: New genome-editing platform significantly increases accuracy of CRISPR-based systems

A next-generation genome editing system developed by MGH investigators substantially decreases the risk of producing unwanted, off-target gene mutations.

04/24/2014: Use of frozen material for fecal transplant successful in treating C. difficile infection

A pilot study by Massachusetts General Hospital MGH investigators may lead to greater availability and acceptability of an unusual treatment for a serious medical problem – use of fecal material from healthy donors to treat recurrent diarrhea caused by C. difficile bacteria.

04/24/2014: Genomics' daunting challenge: Identifying variants that matter

While the latest genome sequencing technologies can generate detailed catalogs of genomic variants, researchers face an ongoing challenge of distinguishing variants that cause disease from those that do not.

04/23/2014: Study Shows Aspirin Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risks for Those with Specific Gene

Researchers from MGH, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine have shown that aspirin’s previous reported ability to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer applies only to individuals with high levels of a specific gene product in their colons.

04/21/2014: Fast, simple-to-use assay reveals the ‘family tree’ of cancer metastases

A simple assay developed by an MGH research team can reveal the evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within a patient, information that may someday help with treatment planning.

04/15/2014: Casual marijuana use changes brain structures involved in reward, emotion and motivation

Even casual use of marijuana appears to cause significant structural changes in key brain structures of young adults, a new study finds. Researchers from MGH and Northwestern University have found differences between casual users of marijuana and non-users in the size, shape, and structure of brain regions involved with motivation, emotion and reward.

04/14/2014: Long-term study supports detrimental effects of television viewing on sleep in young children

A study following more than 1,800 children from ages 6 months to nearly 8 years found a small but consistent association between increased television viewing and shorter sleep duration.

04/10/2014: Researchers identify transcription factors distinguishing glioblastoma stem cells

The activity of four transcription factors appears to distinguish the small proportion of glioblastoma cells responsible for the aggressiveness and treatment resistance of the deadly brain tumor. The findings identify molecular circuits that may be targeted by new therapeutic approaches

04/09/2014: Study confirms impact of clinician-patient relationship on health outcomes

A meta-analysis of studies that investigated measures designed to improve health professionals’ interactions with patients confirms that such efforts can produce health effects just as beneficial as taking a daily aspirin to prevent heart attack.

04/03/2014: An ultrathin collagen matrix biomaterial tool for 3-D microtissue engineering

A team of researchers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital have demonstrated a new nanoscale matrix biomaterial assembly that can maintain liver cell morphology and function in microfluidic devices for longer times than has been previously been reported in microfluidic devices.

03/26/2014: New drug successfully treats crizotinib-resistant, ALK-positive lung cancer

A new drug called ceritinib appears to be effective against advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer, both in tumors that have become resistant to crizotinib and in those never treated with the older drug.

03/23/2014: Mass. General study identifies path to safer drugs for heart disease, cancer

MGH investigators may have found a way to solve a problem that has plagued a group of drugs called ligand-mimicking integrin inhibitors, which have the potential to treat conditions ranging from heart attacks to cancer metastasis.

03/21/2014: Food insecurity linked to cost-related medication underuse in chronically ill Americans

Chronically ill adults who reported not having consistent access to food due to financial instability were significantly more likely to report taking less than prescribed doses of medication because of cost concerns.

03/12/2014: Newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients show imbalance in intestinal microbial population

A multi-institutional study led by investigators from MGH and the Broad Institute has identified how the intestinal microbial population of newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients differs from that of individuals free of inflammatory bowel disease.

03/11/2014: Patients with repeat ED visits for opioid overdose more likely to be hospitalized, require respiratory support

A study conducted by MGH investigators found that patients brought to hospital emergency departments more than once in a year for treatment of opioid drug overdoses are more likely to be hospitalized for overdose and to need respiratory support with a mechanical ventilator. The study also identified factors that increased the risk of subsequent overdoses requiring emergency department visits.

03/05/2014: Novel cancer vaccine holds promise against ovarian cancer, mesothelioma

A novel approach to cancer immunotherapy may provide a cost-effective weapon against some of the most deadly tumors, including ovarian cancer and mesothelioma. A protein engineered by MGH investigators to combine a molecule targeting a tumor antigen with an immune-function stimuating protein prolonged survival in animal models of both tumors.

02/27/2014: High-calorie feeding may slow progression of ALS

Increasing the number of calories consumed by patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be a relatively simple way of extending their survival. A phase 2 clinical trial led by Massachusetts General Hospital physicians found that ALS patients receiving a high-calorie, high-carbohydrate tube-feeding formula lived longer with fewer adverse events than participants who received a standard formula designed maintain their weight.

02/24/2014: Specialized cognitive behavioral therapy improves blood sugar control in depressed patients with type 2 diabetes

A program of cognitive behavioral therapy that addresses both mood and diabetes self-care led to improved blood sugar control and produced faster relief of depression in patients with poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes.

02/20/2014: Survey finds rural primary care physicians as committed to professionalism, quality improvement as their urban counterparts

A new study finds few meaningful differences between rural and urban primary care physicians on key measures of professionalism, including their attitudes about participation in quality care improvement.

02/12/2014: Pregabalin effectively treats restless leg syndrome, less likely than dopamine drugs to worsen symptoms

A year-long study has found that pregabalin – FDA-approved to treat nerve pain and seizures – was effective in reducing symptoms of restless leg syndrome and, with long-term treatment, was less likely than pramipexole – which activates the dopamine neurotransmission system and is FDA approved for RLS treatment – to cause worsening of symptoms.

02/07/2014: First Huntington disease prevention trial shows treatment safety, suggests slowing of presymptomatic progression

The first clinical trial of a drug intended to delay the onset of symptoms of Huntington disease reveals that high-dose treatment with the nutritional supplement creatine was safe and well tolerated by most study participants. In addition, neuroimaging provided evidence that creatine might slow the progression of presymptomatic disease.

02/03/2014: Gene mutation defines brain tumors that benefit from aggressive surgery

A new study has found that patients with malignant astrocytoma – the most common malignant brain tumor – whose tumors carry a specific genetic mutation benefit greatly from surgical removal of the largest possible amount of tumor.

01/26/2014: Shortening guide RNA markedly improves specificity of CRISPR-Cas nucleases

MGH investigators have found that adjusting the length of the the guide RNA component of the gene-editing tools called CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases can substantially reduce the occurrence of DNA mutations at off-target sites.

01/17/2014: Mass. General researcher Gary Ruvkun a co-recipient of 2014 Wolf Prize

MGH investigator Gary Ruvkun, PhD, has been named a co-recipient of the 2014 Wolf Prize in Medicine, along with Victor Ambros, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Nahum Sonenberg, PhD of McGill University. Ruvkun and Ambros are being honored for discovering that tiny molecules of RNA control the activity of other genes that encode proteins in animals.

01/15/2014: 'Barcode' profiling enables analysis of hundreds of tumor marker proteins at once

A new technology developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Systems Biology allows simultaneous analysis of hundreds of cancer-related protein markers from miniscule patient samples gathered through minimally invasive methods.

01/12/2014: MGH/Ragon Institute study identifies population of stem-like cells where HIV persists in spite of treatment

Investigators from MGH and the Ragon Institute may have found where HIV persists in the body in spite of antiviral treatment – in a small group of recently identified T cells with stem-cell-like properties.

01/12/2014: Multi-institutional team finds targetable mutation in rare brain tumor

A team led by investigators from MGH, Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Broad Institute has found that a gene mutation associated with several types of cancer also may be responsible for a rare but debilitating brain tumor called papillary craniopharyngioma.

01/09/2014: Mass. General research could expand availability of hand, face transplants

Making an important step towards greater availability of hand and face transplants, MGH investigators have shown that a procedure developed to induce immune tolerance to organ transplants can induce tolerance to a model limb transplant in miniature swine.

01/07/2014: Longer-term varenicline treatment improves tobacco abstinence for people with serious mental illness

Extended treatment with the smoking cessation drug varenicline significantly improved the ability of individuals with serious mental illness to maintain abstinence from tobacco after a standard 12-week course of treatment.

01/07/2014: Researchers discover molecule behind the benefits of exercise

While it's clear that exercise can improve health and longevity, the changes that occur in the body to facilitate these benefits are less clear. Now MGH researchers have discovered a molecule that is produced during exercise and contributes to the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolism.

01/07/2014: "Traffic light" food labels, prominent positioning of healthy items produce lasting purchase choice changes

The use of color-coded "traffic light" food labels and changes in the way popular items are displayed appear to have produced a long-term increase in the choice of more healthful food items among customers in a large hospital cafeteria.

01/06/2014: Tiny Technology Enables Improved Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

The ability to detect circulating tumor cells as they travel through the blood can play an important role in early diagnosis, characterization of cancer subtypes, treatment monitoring and metastasis.

12/23/2013: Inosine treatment safely elevates urate levels in Parkinson disease patients

A clinical trial assessing the potential of the nutritional supplement inosine to treat Parkinson disease has found that the studied dosages successfully raised participants' levels of the antioxidant urate without producing serious side effects.

12/20/2013: New genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes revealed

An international team of researchers in Mexico and the United States has uncovered a new genetic clue that contributes to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly the elevated risk among Mexican and other Latin American populations.

12/16/2013: Physicians who prefer hospice care for themselves more likely to discuss hospice with patients

Although the vast majority of physicians participating in a multiregional study indicated that they would personally enroll in hospice care if they received a terminal cancer diagnosis, less than one-third would discuss hospice care early in the course of treating a terminally ill cancer patient.

12/13/2013: Differences in plaque composition, immune activation may explain elevated cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected women

An MGH research team has discovered a possible mechanism behind the elevated risk of cardiovascular disease in women infected with HIV, a risk even higher than that of HIV-infected men.

12/11/2013: Boston Hospital Trio Awarded $25 Million NIH Grant to Study Critical Limb Ischemia

A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Medical Center and MGH has been awarded $25 million by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a clinical trial comparing traditional bypass surgery with a less invasive treatment alternative for patients with critical limb ischemia.

12/11/2013: Brief laser-light treatment may significantly improve effectiveness of influenza vaccines

Pretreating the site of intradermal vaccination – vaccine delivered into the skin rather than to muscles beneath the skin – with a particular wavelength of laser light may substantially improve vaccine effectiveness without the adverse effects of chemical additives currently used to boost vaccine efficacy.

12/06/2013: Clinical waste may prove valuable for monitoring treatment response in ovarian cancer

MGH investigators have developed a microchip-based device that can isolate and identify tumor cells found in ascites – an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen that often occurs in abdominal cancers – potentially simplifying the monitoring of treatment response in ovarian cancer and other malignancies.

12/04/2013: Study Highlights Massive Benefits of HIV Treatment in South Africa

Antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection has saved 2.8 million years of life in South Africa since 2004 and is projected to save an additional 15.1 million years of life by 2030, according to a new study published online in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

11/28/2013: Researchers find a missing component in effort to create primitive, synthetic cells

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators working to create "protocells" – primitive synthetic cells consisting of a nucleic acid strand encased within a membrane-bound compartment – have accomplished an important step towards their goal, finding a solution to the potential incompatibility between a chemical requirement of RNA copying and the stability of the protocell membrane.

11/24/2013: Study identifies protein essential for innate immune recognition, response to viral infection

An MGH-led research team has identified an immune cell protein that is critical to setting off the body's initial response against viral infection. The report describes finding that a protein called GEF-H1 is essential to the ability of macrophages – major contributors to the innate immune system – to respond to viral infections like influenza.

11/22/2013: Mass General study analyzes unicycle injuries in the United States.

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has identified, for the first time, the types of injuries incurred in unicycle accidents in the United States.

11/20/2013: Current practice may over-diagnose vitamin D deficiency

The current "gold standard" test for measuring vitamin D status may not accurately diagnose vitamin D deficiency in black individuals.

11/20/2013: Study reveals how variant forms of APOE protein impact risk of Alzheimer's disease

A study led by MGH investigators shows that even low levels of the Alzheimer's-associated APOE4 protein can increase toxic amyloid beta brain plaques and the characteristic neuronal damage in mouse models of the disease. Introducing APOE2, a rare, potentially protective variant, reduced amyloid deposits and associated damage.

11/20/2013: Tiny antisense molecules increase 'good cholesterol' levels in obese primates

A strategy developed by MGH-based investigators to increase levels of beneficial high-density lipoprotein has been shown for the first time to be effective in non-human primates.

11/19/2013: Age Affects Short-term Quality of Life After Breast Biopsy

Breast biopsies can adversely affect short-term quality-of-life, and the effects are more pronounced in younger patients, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

11/19/2013: Study Finds Altered Brain Connections in Epilepsy Patients

Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

11/15/2013: Blocking signal-transmitting cellular pores may prevent kidney damage from diabetes, other conditions

A group of MGH investigators has identified a molecule that plays a key role in the breakdown of the kidney filter, presenting a potential therapeutic target for stopping the type of kidney damage associated with diabetes before it becomes irreversible.

11/14/2013: Mass. General study identifies genes uniquely expressed by the brain's immune cells

MGH investigators have identified a group of genes used by the brain's immune cells – called microglia – to sense pathogenics, toxins or damaged cells that require their response. Identifying these genes should lead to better understanding of the role of microglia in normal brains and in neurodegenerative disorders.

11/08/2013: Repurposed drug may be first targeted treatment for serious kidney disease

A drug approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may also turn out to be the first targeted therapy for one of the most common forms of kidney disease, a condition that almost inevitably leads to kidney failure.

11/06/2013: Postoperative pain may increase risk of temporary problems with learning, memory

The pain caused by a surgical incision may contribute to the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, a sometimes transient impairment in learning and memory that affects a small but significant number of patients in the days following a surgical procedure.

11/06/2013: Postoperative pain may increase risk of temporary problems with learning, memory

The pain caused by a surgical incision may contribute to the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, a sometimes transient impairment in learning and memory that affects a small but significant number of patients in the days following a surgical procedure.

11/05/2013: Pleasure and pain brain signals disrupted in fibromyalgia patients

New research indicates that a disruption of brain signals for reward and punishment contributes to increased pain sensitivity, known as hyperalgesia, in fibromyalgia patients.

11/04/2013: Imaging studies may predict tumor response to anti-angiogenic drugs

Advanced imaging techniques may be able to distinguish which patients' tumors will respond to treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs and which will not.

10/31/2013: Automated system promises precise control of medically induced coma

Putting patients with severe head injuries in induced comas requires constant monitoring of brain activity and manual adjustment of drug dosage. Now a computer-controlled system promises to automate the process, making it more precise and efficient and opening the door to more advanced control of anesthesia.

10/30/2013: Early HIV antiviral treatment found to be cost-effective in South Africa, India

"Treatment as prevention" – early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals with uninfected sexual partners to prevent viral transmission – appears to make economic sense, along with meeting its clinical goals of helping infected patients stay healthy and reducing transmission.

10/29/2013: Massachusetts General Hospital researchers identify identify biomarker to predict diabetes risk

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care and Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute have found a chemical biomarker in blood that can predict diabetes risk more than a decade before the onset of the disease.

10/24/2013: Genetic analysis reveals novel insights into the genetic architecture of obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome

An international research consortium led by investigators at MGH and the University of Chicago has answered several questions about the genetic background of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome, providing the first direct confirmation that both are highly heritable and also revealing major differences between the underlying genetic makeup of the disorders.

10/22/2013: Hydrogel implant enables light-based communication with cells inside the body

As researchers develop novel therapies based on inducing specific cells to do specific things, getting the right message to the right group of cells at the right time remains a major challenge. Now researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at MGH have developed a way to deliver a light signal to specific tissues deep within the body.

10/17/2013: "Traffic-light" labeling increases customer's attention to nutritional quality of their food choices

A simple, color-coded system for labeling food items in a hospital cafeteria appears to have increased customer's attention to the healthiness of their food choices, along with encouraging purchases of the most healthy items.

10/08/2013: Combination of anemia and high altitudes significantly increases risk of poor outcomes in children with pneumonia

Pneumonia is the leading cause of death of young children around the world, and a new study now finds that the risk of poor outcomes – including persistent pneumonia, secondary infections, organ failure or death – in children who contract pneumonia is four times higher in those who also have anemia and live at high altitudes.

10/02/2013: Does a High Statin Dose Reduce Periodontal Inflammation?

New data showing that high-dose atorvastatin can reduce periodontal inflammation in as little as four weeks suggests a new mechanism of action for statins.

10/01/2013: Blood-pressure drug may help improve cancer treatment

Use of existing, well-established hypertension drugs could improve the outcome of cancer chemotherapy by opening up collapsed blood vessels in solid tumors.

09/25/2013: How difficult are diagnostic and screening tests for patients?

Medical tests with greater morbidity are less likely to be completed by patients, and this lack of health maintenance adherence has implications for future health outcomes.

09/24/2013: Study confirms that rare mutations increase risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

MGH researchers have identified and validated two rare gene mutations that appear to cause the common form of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that strikes after the age of 60. The two mutations occur in a gene called ADAM10, which now becomes the second pathologically-confirmed gene for late-onset AD and the fifth AD gene overall.

09/23/2013: CDC, Mass. General study reveals that preventing malaria in travelers to West Africa reduces health costs

Not only do U.S. travelers to West Africa who consult health providers before they leave and take prescribed preventive medications substantially reduce their risk of contracting malaria, they also reduce costs to their health insurance providers and, in most cases, to themselves.

09/18/2013: Study shows colonoscopy better than sigmoidoscopy in protecting against colorectal cancer

A new study finds that colonoscopy appears to reduce the risk of developing or dying from colorectal cancer more powerfully than does sigmoidoscopy, a similar procedure that examines only a portion of the colon. The investigation also identifies molecular features that may help explain tumors that are diagnosed despite an individual's having recently undergone colonoscopy.

09/11/2013: Testosterone deficiency not the only cause of age-associated changes in men

A study by MGH researchers finds that some of the symptoms often seen in middle-aged men – changes in body composition, energy, strength and sexual function – are caused not only by decreases in testosterone production but also by reduced levels of estrogen.

09/11/2013: Gene-expression-based biomarker predicts long-term risk of breast cancer recurrence

A comparison of three methods of predicting recurrence risk in women treated for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer finds that only the breast cancer index – a biomarker based on the expression levels of seven tumor-specific genes – accurately identifies patients who continue to be at risk after five years of estrogen-blocking treatment.

09/10/2013: Improved adherence to preventive antiretroviral therapy may reduce transmission of HIV

A recently completed substudy of a larger clinical trial found that pre-exposure prophylaxis – a new strategy to prevent HIV infection by prescribing a daily antiretroviral drug to at-risk individuals – can be a powerful tool when participants take their medications.

09/09/2013: In-home intervention improves routines that reduce risk of childhood obesity

A new study appearing in JAMA Pediatrics describes how a home-based program that helped at-risk families improve household routines was able to slow weight gain in a group of young children.

08/29/2013: Assay shown to be effective in measuring levels of mutant huntingtin protein

An assay designed to measure normal and abnormal forms of the huntingtin protein – the mutated form of which causes Huntington's disease – was successful in detecting levels of the mutant protein in a large multicenter study of individuals at risk for the devastating neurological disorder.

08/21/2013: Use of tPA for ischemic stroke nearly doubled from 2003 to 2011

Use of the "clot-busting" drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to treat patients with strokes caused by a blockage of blood flow nearly doubled between 2003 and 2011, but not all eligible patients are receiving the potentially life-saving therapy.

08/18/2013: New MR analysis technique reveals brain tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy

A new way of analyzing data acquired in MR imaging appears to be able to identify whether or not tumors are responding to anti-angiogenesis therapy, information that can help physicians determine the most appropriate treatments and discontinue ones that are ineffective.

08/11/2013: Macrophage proliferation appears to drive progression of atherosclerosis

New insights into the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques could lead to better treatment or prevention of heart attacks and strokes.

07/30/2013: Study finds evidence of nerve damage in around half of fibromyalgia patients

About half of a small group of patients with fibromyalgia – a common syndrome that causes chronic pain and other symptoms – was found to have damage to nerve fibers in their skin and other evidence of a disease called small-fiber polyneuropathy, a disorder that sometimes can be treated.

07/29/2013: Playing college football linked with high blood pressure risk

College football players, especially linemen, may develop high blood pressure over the course of their first season, according to a small study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

07/23/2013: Digital PCR technology detects brain-tumor-associated mutation in cerebrospinal fluid

MGH researchers and their colleagues have used digital versions of a standard molecular biology tool to detect a common tumor-associated mutation in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain tumors.

07/15/2013: Researchers generate long-lasting blood vessels from reprogrammed human cells

MGH researchers have used vascular precursor cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells to generate, in an animal model, functional blood vessels that lasted as long as nine months.

07/03/2013: Genetic signals reflect the evolutionary impact of cholera

An international research team has used a novel approach to identify genetic factors that appear to influence susceptibility to cholera. The findings indicate the importance of pathways involved in regulating water loss in intestinal cells and of the innate immune system in the body's response to the bacteria that causes cholera.

07/01/2013: Lack of immune cell receptor impairs clearance of amyloid beta protein from the brain

Identification of a protein that appears to play an important role in the immune system's removal of amyloid beta protein from the brain could lead to a new treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

06/28/2013: Biomarker predicts risk of breast cancer recurrence after tamoxifen treatment

A biomarker reflecting expression levels of two genes in tumor tissue may be able to predict which women treated for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer should receive a second estrogen-blocking medication after completing tamoxifen treatment.

06/24/2013: Pediatric practices can offer smoking cessation assistance to parents of their patients

Finally some good news for parents who smoke: you may now be able to get help quitting from an unlikely source, your child’s doctor. A study in the journal Pediatrics, which has been posted online, shows that it is feasible for pediatric practices to incorporate into their normal routine efforts to inform patients' parents about services available to help them quit smoking.

06/23/2013: Powerful gene-editing tool appears to cause off-target mutations in human cells

MGH researchers have found a significant limitation to the use of a new gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas RGNs, production of unwanted DNA mutations at sites other than the desired target. Their findings indicate the need to improve the precision of the technology.

06/20/2013: Mass. General Center Joins JDRF Consortium Following Groundbreaking Diabetes Research

The Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (VIC), has joined with 24 other institutions as part of the first-ever JDRF Encapsulation Consortium in the fight against type 1 diabetes

06/19/2013: Restoring appropriate movement to immune cells may save lives of patients with serious burns

A device that measures the movement of key immune cells, developed by MGH investigators, may help determine which patients with serious burns are at risk for septic complications, and a novel treatment that directly addresses the cause of those complications could prevent many associated deaths.

06/17/2013: Rare genomic mutations found in 10 families with early-onset, familial Alzheimer's disease

MGH researchers have discovered a type of mutation known as copy-number variants – deletions, duplications, or rearrangements of human genomic DNA – in affected members of 10 families with early-onset Alzheimer's. These are the first new early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease gene mutations to be reported since 1995.

06/17/2013: Study finds significant racial and ethnic disparities in usage of specialty services for children with autism

A study from investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children found that African-American or Hispanic children diagnosed with autism were significantly less likely than white children to have received subspecialty care or procedures related to conditions that often accompany autism spectrum disorders.

06/03/2013: MGH-led studies shed new light on targeted lung cancer therapy

Research teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center investigators are publishing two important studies regarding use of the targeted cancer drug crizotinib for treatment of advanced lung cancer driven by specific genetic mutations.

06/03/2013: Early-life risk factors account for racial and ethnic disparities in childhood obesity

A research team reports in JAMA Pediatrics that the known prevalence of obesity and overweight among black and Hispanic children can largely be explained by risk factors such as rapid infant weight gain, early introduction of solid foods and a lack of exclusive breast feeding.

05/22/2013: Survey points out deficiencies in addictions training for medical residents

A 2012 survey of internal medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital found that more than half rated the training they had received in addiction and other substance use disorders as fair or poor. In response to the findings the MGH has increased residents' training in addiction medicine.

05/20/2013: Genetic diversity within tumors predicts outcome in head and neck cancer

A new measure of the heterogeneity – the variety of genetic mutations – of cells within a tumor appears to predict treatment outcomes of patients with the most common type of head and neck cancer.

05/16/2013: Women with Chronic Physical Disabilities Are No Less Likely to Bear Children

A new study finds that women with chronic physical disabilities are about as likely as nondisabled women to say they are currently pregnant, after age and other sociodemographic factors are taken into account.

05/15/2013: Study finds disagreement on the role of primary care nurse practitioners

A New England Journal of Medicine study finds that, while primary care physicians and nurse practitioners agree that nurse practitioners "should be able to practice to the full extent of their education and training," they significantly disagree about some proposed changes to the scope of nurse practitioners' responsibilities.

05/14/2013: Treatment with two osteoporosis drugs better at increasing bone density than single-drug therapy

A combination of two FDA-approved osteoporosis drugs with different mechanisms of action was found to increase bone density better than treatment with either drug alone in a small clinical trial.

05/08/2013: Mass. General, Duke study identifies two genes that combine to cause rare syndrome

Researchers from MGH and Duke University have identified genetic mutations that appear to underlie a rare but devastating syndrome combining reproductive failure with cerebellar ataxia – a lack of muscle coordination – and dementia.

05/05/2013: Portable device provides rapid, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis, other bacterial infections

A handheld diagnostic device that MGH investigators first developed to diagnose cancer has been adapted to rapidly diagnose tuberculosis and other important infectious bacteria.

05/02/2013: Gene variant appears to predict weight loss after gastric bypass

MGH researchers have identified a gene variant that helps predict how much weight an individual will lose after gastric bypass surgery, a finding with the potential both to guide treatment planning and to facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches to treating obesity and related conditions like diabetes.

05/01/2013: Study identifies genes, pathways altered during relaxation response practice

A new study from investigators at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind/Body Medicine at MGH and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center finds that elicitation of the relaxation response produces immediate changes in the expression of genes involved in immune function, energy metabolism and insulin secretion.

04/25/2013: Alzheimer's risk gene presents potential treatment target

MGH investigators have determined that one of the recently identified genes contributing to the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease regulates the clearance of the toxic amyloid beta (A-beta) protein that accumulates in the brains of patients with the disease.

04/18/2013: Three Mass. General researchers among recipients of Top 10 Clinical Research Achievement awards

Three projects led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have been named among the Clinical Research Forum's Top 10 Clinical Research Achievements of 2012.

04/15/2013: Gene-expression signature may signify risk for recurrence, metastasis in prostate cancer

A team led by MGH researchers has identified a genetic signature that may reflect the risk of tumor recurrence or spread in men surgically treated for prostate cancer. If confirmed, the genetic risk index also may help distinguish tumors that require aggressive treatment from those that can safely be monitored.

04/14/2013: Mass. General team develops implantable, bioengineered rat kidney

Bioengineered rat kidneys developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators successfully produced urine both in a laboratory apparatus and after being transplanted into living animals.

04/12/2013: Mass. General Neurological Clinical Research Institute and Prize4Life receive Bio-IT World Award for creation of ALS data platform

The MGH Neurological Clinical Research Institute and Prize4Life, an organization dedicated to accelerating discovery of treatments and a cure for ALS, received a Best Practices Award at the 2013 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo for their creation of PRO-ACT ,the largest database of information from ALS clinical trials and patient care.

04/09/2013: Google searches about mental illness follow seasonal patterns

A new study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that Google searches for information across all major mental illnesses and problems followed seasonal patterns, suggesting mental illness may be more strongly linked with seasonal patterns than previously thought.

04/08/2013: Adding intestinal enzyme to diets of mice appears to prevent, treat metabolic syndrome

Feeding an intestinal enzyme to mice kept on a high-fat diet appears to prevent the development of metabolic syndrome – a group of symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and fatty liver – and to reduce symptoms in mice that already had the condition.

04/07/2013: Next-generation PI3 Kinase Inhibitor Demonstrated Early Efficacy, Safety

GDC-0032, a potent, next-generation PI3 kinase inhibitor, demonstrated early signs of efficacy for patients with cancers driven by mutations in the PI3 kinase alpha gene, according to first in-human results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013.

04/03/2013: Third-generation device significantly improves capture of circulating tumor cells

A new system for isolating rare circulating tumor cells – living solid tumor cells found at low levels in the bloodstream – shows significant improvement over previously developed devices and does not require prior identification of tumor-specific target molecules.

04/03/2013: Phase 1 ALS trial is first to test antisense treatment of neurodegenerative disease

The initial clinical trial of a novel approach to treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – blocking production of a mutant protein that causes an inherited form of the progressive neurodegenerative disease – may be a first step towards a new era in the treatment of such disorders.

03/27/2013: Changes in gastrointestinal microbes may produce some benefits of gastric bypass

Changes in the microbial population of the gastrointestinal tract may underlie some of the benefits of gastric bypass surgery, reports a team of researchers from MGH and Harvard University. The investigators also found that post-bypass alterations in the microbial population of mice can induce weight loss in animals that did not have surgery.

03/12/2013: Weight gain after quitting smoking does not negate health benefits

An analysis of data from the Framingham Offspring Study confirms that the health benefits of quitting smoking far exceed any negative effects of weight gained after smoking cessation

03/11/2013: Nerve damage may underlie widespread, unexplained chronic pain in children

Study finds that most of a group of young patients seen at Mass General for chronic, unexplained pain had test results indicating small-fiber polyneuropathy, a condition not previously reported in children.

03/08/2013: BRAF inhibitor treatment causes melanoma cells to shift how they produce energy

A multi-institutional study has revealed that BRAF-positive metastatic malignant melanomas develop resistance to treatment with drugs targeting the BRAF/MEK growth pathway through a major change in metabolism. The findings suggest a strategy to improve the effectiveness of currently available targeted therapies.

03/06/2013: Folate and vitamin B12 supplementation reduces disabling schizophrenia symptoms in patients with specific gene variants

Adding the dietary supplements folate and vitamin B12 to treatment with antipsychotic medication improved a core symptom component of schizophrenia in a study of more than 100 patients.

03/05/2013: EEG patterns indicate when patients lose, regain consciousness under propofol anesthesia

MGH investigators have identified specific EEG signatures that indicate when patients lose and regain consciousness under the general anesthetic drug propofol. The findings should lead to better ways of monitoring awareness and tracking other aspects of the brain states of patients under anesthesia.

02/28/2013: Study identifies growth factor essential to the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor

A multi-institutional team led by MGH researchers has identified a molecular pathway that appears to be essential for the growth and spread of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children.

02/25/2013: Extremely high estrogen levels may underlie serious complications affecting single-birth IVF pregnancies

MGH researchers have identified what may be a major factor behind the increased risk of two adverse outcomes in IVF pregnancies – extremely high estrogen levels at the time of embryo transfer. They describe a protocol that reduced the risk of infants born small for their gestational age and the risk of preeclampsia in a small group of patients.

02/13/2013: Probiotic-Derived Treatment Offers New Hope for Premature Babies

Chemicals secreted by "good" bacteria that typically live in the intestines of babies could reduce the frequency and severity of a common and often-lethal disease of premature infants.

02/13/2013: Cellular renewal process may underlie benefits of omega fatty acids

A search for genes that change their levels of expression in response to starvation has uncovered potential clues to the mechanism behind the health benefits of omega fatty acids. MGH researchers report that omega-6 fatty acids may activate a cellular renewal process called autophagy, which may be deficient in several important diseases of aging.

02/11/2013: Mouse models fail to reproduce inflammatory genomic response to serious injuries

Existing mouse models do not appear to accurately reproduce the human genomic response to serious traumatic injury, including major burns.

02/06/2013: Brain research provides clues to what makes people think and behave differently

Differences in the physical connections of the brain are at the root of what make people think and behave differently from one another. Researchers reporting in the February 6 issue of Neuron shed new light on the details of this phenomenon, mapping the exact brain regions where individual differences occur.

02/05/2013: Benefits of CT Outweigh Cancer Risks in Young Adults

The underlying medical conditions facing young adults who undergo computed tomography (CT) exams represent a significantly greater health risk than that of radiation-induced cancer from CT.

02/05/2013: European restrictions on working hours have 'profound' effect on medical care and education

In the February 6 issue of JAMA, investigators from MGH and Harvard Medical School describe what is known about the impact on medical care and resident training of the European Working Time Directive and its implications for postgraduate medical education in the U.S.

01/31/2013: Transition in cell type parallels treatment response, disease progression in breast cancer

A process that normally occurs in developing embryos – the changing of one basic cell type into another – has also been suspected of playing a role in cancer metastasis. Now a study from MGH Cancer Center researchers has associated this process, called epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with disease progression and treatment response in breast cancer patients.

01/29/2013: Physicians' brain scans indicate that doctors can feel their patients' pain – and their pain relief

In a novel investigation in which physicians underwent brain scans while they believed they were actually treating patients, researchers have provided the first scientific evidence indicating that doctors truly can feel their patients’ pain – and can also experience their relief following treatment.

01/29/2013: Mass. General study clarifies antidepressant contribution to arrhythmia risk

An analysis of the medical records of more than 38,000 patients by MGH investigators clarifies the contribution of citalopram and other antidepressants to lengthening of the QT interval, an aspect of the heart's electrical activity that – when prolonged – may increase the risk of dangerous arrhythmias.

01/24/2013: Neuroinflammation may be behind general-anesthesia-associated learning disabilities

Two studies in mice suggest that several factors may combine to induce impairments in learning and memory, accompanied by the inflammation of brain tissue, in young mammals receiving general anesthesia and that the offspring of animals that received general anesthesia during pregnancy may show the same effects.

01/23/2013: New imaging method facilitates research into cystic fibrosis and other pulmonary diseases

Investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and MGH have developed a new imaging method that promises to provide fast, accurate images of the human airway to enhance research into new treatments and medications for diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

01/15/2013: Advanced Airway Procedures for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Associated With Poorer Neurological Outcomes

In patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation with advanced airway management was a significant predictor of poor neurological outcome compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation.

01/14/2013: Drug overdose now the leading cause of death among homeless adults in Boston

Investigators from MGH and the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program compared rates and causes of death among those served by BHCHP between 2003 to 2008 with data from a 1997 study and found that, while drug overdose had replaced HIV as the leading cause of death, overall mortality rates had not changed.

01/14/2013: Generic HIV treatment strategy could save nearly $1 billion annually but may be less effective

Replacing the combination of brand-name, antiretroviral drugs currently recommended for control of HIV infection with soon-to-be-available generic medications could save the U.S. health care system almost $1 billion a year but may diminish the effectiveness of HIV treatment.

01/14/2013: Impaired coordination of brain activity in autism involves local, as well as long-range, signaling

A new study finds that local functional connectivity of the brain – the extent to which activity within a small brain region appears to be coordinated – is reduced in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. It had been believed that local connectivity was increased in the brains of autistic individuals while long-range connectivity was reduced.

01/13/2013: Pill-sized device provides rapid, detailed imaging of esophageal lining

Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an imaging system enclosed in a capsule about the size of a multivitamin pill that creates detailed, microscopic images of the esophageal wall.

01/07/2013: Looming Malpractice

The length of time it takes to resolve a malpractice claim places stress on patients, physicians and the legal system. The time spent with open claims may be even more distressing for physicians than the financial costs of the claims.

01/07/2013: Many physicians often fulfill patient requests for brand-name drugs instead of equivalent generics

More than a third of U.S. physicians responding to a national survey indicated they often or sometimes prescribed brand-name drugs when appropriate generic substitutes were available simply because patients requested the brand-name drug. Respondents who had marketing relationships with industry were more likely to fulfill such requests.

12/18/2012: Immediate Health Risk Must Be Weighed Against Radiation-Induced Cancer Risk

The lifetime risks of cancer from medical radiation may be overemphasized relative to more immediate health risks, according to a new study.

12/17/2012: Genetic manipulation of urate alters neurodegeneration in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

A study by MGH researchers adds further support to the possibility that increasing levels of urate may protect against Parkinson's disease. The investigators report that mice with a genetic mutation increasing urate levels were protected against Parkinson's-like neurodegeneration, while the damage was worse in animals with abnormally low urate.

12/13/2012: Intestinal immune cells play an unexpected role in immune surveillance of the bloodstream

A type of immune cell found in the small intestine plays a previously unsuspected role in monitoring antigens circulating in the bloodstream. Disruption of the newly discovered regulatory system may lead to the development of autoimmune disorders, inflammatory bowel disease or food allergies.

12/10/2012: Educational video helps terminal cancer patients decide whether to receive CPR

Patients with terminal cancer who viewed a brief video demonstrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were less likely than patients who only listened to a verbal description of the procedure to indicate a preference for receiving CPR in the event of an in-hospital cardiac arrest.

12/06/2012: Combining two genome analysis approaches supports immune system contribution to autism

Researchers using novel approaches and methodologies of identifying genes that contribute to the development of autism have found evidence that disturbances in several immune-system-related pathways contribute to development of autism spectrum disorders.

12/06/2012: Protein controlling glucose metabolism also a tumor suppressor

A protein known to regulate how cells process glucose also appears to be a tumor suppressor, adding to the potential that therapies directed at cellular metabolism may help suppress tumor growth.

12/05/2012: Women and men appear to benefit in different ways from AA participation

A new study finds differences in how participation in Alcoholics Anonymous helps men and women maintain sobriety. For men, avoiding companions and situations that encourage drinking had more powerful effects, while increased confidence in the ability to avoid drinking in response to feelings of sadness or depression was more important for women.

11/29/2012: Defining career paths in health systems improvement

Training the next generation of experts dedicated to improving the quality of the U.S. health care system will require a new framework for career development, according to three physicians writing in the January 2013 issue of Academic Medicine.

11/29/2012: Enzyme inhibition protects against Huntington's disease damage in two animal models

Treatment with a novel agent that inhibits the activity of SIRT2, an enzyme that regulates many important cellular functions, reduced neurological damage, slowed the loss of motor function and extended survival in two animal models of Huntington's disease.

11/28/2012: Men with Belly Fat at Risk for Osteoporosis

Visceral, or deep belly, obesity is a risk factor for bone loss and decreased bone strength in men, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

11/26/2012: Newly insured patients may have trouble finding primary care physicians

A study by MGH researchers finds that many of the primary care physicians likely to be asked to care for patients newly insured under the Affordable Care Act may be not be accepting new patients. Strategies designed to increase and support these "safety-net" physicians could help ensure that newly covered patients have access to primary care.

11/20/2012: Novel Breast Screening Technology Increases Diagnostic Accuracy

The addition of three-dimensional breast imaging—a technology called tomosynthesis—to standard digital mammography significantly increases radiologists' diagnostic accuracy while reducing false positive recall rates, according to the results of a multi-center study.

11/13/2012: Glutamate neurotransmission system may be involved with depression risk

Researchers using a new approach to identifying genes associated with depression have found that variants in a group of genes involved in transmission of signals by the neurotransmitter glutamate appear to increase the risk of depression.

11/12/2012: Meditation appears to produce enduring changes in emotional processing in the brain

A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. The researchers also found differences in those effects based on the specific type of meditation practiced.

11/11/2012: Detection, analysis of 'cell dust' may allow diagnosis, monitoring of brain cancer

A novel miniature diagnostic platform using nuclear magnetic resonance technology is capable of detecting minuscule cell particles known as microvesicles in a drop of blood. Detecting microvesicles shed by cancer cells could prove a simple means for diagnosing cancer or monitoring treatment response.

11/05/2012: MGH/MIT study discovers how brain activity changes when anesthesia induces unconsciousness

Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have identified for the first time a pattern of brain activity that appears to signal exactly when patients lose consciousness under general anesthesia.

11/05/2012: Study examines smoking by inpatients during hospital stay

A study of smokers admitted to a large urban teaching hospital in Massachusetts found that 18.4 percent reported smoking during their hospitalization.

11/01/2012: Combining antiangiogenesis and anti-HER2 drugs may improve survival of breast cancer patients with brain metastases

Adding an angiogenesis inhibitor to treatment with a HER2-inhibiting drug could improve outcomes for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who develop brain metastases.

10/31/2012: Unexpected factor contributes to melanoma risk in red-haired, fair-skinned individuals

The elevated risk of melanoma among people with red hair and fair skin may be caused by more than just a lack of natural protection against ultraviolet radiation. Resarchers at the MGH Cutaneous Biology Research Center and Cancer Center have found that the type of skin pigment predominantly found in red-haired, fair-skinned individuals may itself contribute to the development of melanoma.

10/31/2012: New genetic links for inflammatory bowel disease uncovered

A study by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and dozens of other organizations identifies new genes associated with inflammatory bowel disease, many appear to be associated with the immune response against both pathogenic and harmless microbes.

10/28/2012: Prostate cancer patients report better quality of life in early follow-up after proton beam radiation therapy versus two other common modalities

Patients undergoing treatment for prostate cancer using proton beam therapy reported a higher quality of life in early follow-up with similar QOL scores at two years compared to two other forms of radiation therapy.

10/18/2012: $5.4 Million Awarded for Research to Guide Alzheimer's Drug Development

Understanding who is most susceptible to Alzheimer's disease and developing early detection models, effective therapies and possibly a cure, is the goal of the largest single private scientific grant ever invested in Alzheimer's Whole Genome Sequencing focused on families afflicted with the disease.

10/16/2012: Many options available to help smokers kick the habit

Smokers today have many options to help them quit, and those who think they have "tried it all" usually have not.

10/16/2012: Drugs used to immobilize patients during surgery raise risk of respiratory complications

MGH researchers have found that medications currently used to immobilize patients during surgery can increase the risk of postoperative respiratory complications.

10/10/2012: Criteria used to diagnose sports head injuries found to be inconsistent

A study of sports programs at three major universities finds that the way the injury commonly called concussion is usually diagnosed – largely based on athletes' subjective symptoms – varies greatly and may not be the best way to determine who is at risk for future problems.

10/01/2012: Study questions association between common heartburn drugs and risk of pneumonia

Studies associating the use of popular anti-heartburn medications with an increased incidence of pneumonia may not have found a true cause-and-effect relationship. A new report also outlines a strategy for determining when the results of such observational studies may have been distorted by unmeasured factors.

09/30/2012: Phase III trial shows crizotinib superior to single-agent chemotherapy for ALK-positive lung cancer

The results of a new phase III trial show that crizotinib, a targeted therapy, is a more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy for patients with advanced, ALK-positive lung cancer.

09/29/2012: Combination of targeted treatment drugs delays resistance in melanoma patients

Combined treatment with two drugs targeting different points in the same growth-factor pathway delayed the development of treatment resistance in patients with BRAF-positive metastatic malignant melanoma.

09/26/2012: Inadequate cellular rest may explain effects of aging on muscles

Is aging inevitable? What factors make older tissues less able to maintain and repair themselves? A new study from MGH investigators and collaborators at King's College London describes how muscle repair is impaired during aging and a strategy that may rejuvenate aging tissue by manipulating the environment of muscle stem cells.

09/20/2012: Taming physical forces that block cancer treatment

An MGH research team has identified factors that contribute to solid stress within tumors, suggesting possible ways to alleviate it, and has developed a simple way to measure such pressures.

09/13/2012: Puberty Turned on by Brain during Deep Sleep

Slow-wave sleep, or ‘deep sleep’, is intimately involved in the complex control of the onset of puberty, according to a recent stud.

09/10/2012: Study Shows That Placebo Response Occurs at Nonconscious Level

With the discovery that the unconscious mind plays a key role in the placebo effect, researchers have identified a novel mechanism that helps explain the power of placebos and nocebos.

09/10/2012: More pregnant women taking high blood pressure drugs, yet safety unclear

Nearly 5 percent of pregnant women are prescribed drugs to treat high blood pressure, including some drugs that aren’t considered safe for mothers or their babies.

08/30/2012: Kidney stenting lowers blood pressure in patients with severe hypertension

Patients with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension saw a significant improvement in their blood pressure with renal artery stent deployment.

08/30/2012: State tax incentives do not appear to increase the rate of living organ donation

The policies that several states have adopted giving tax deductions or credits to living organ donors do not appear to have increased donation rates, finds a study in the August issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

08/20/2012: Vitamin D supplementation can decrease risk of respiratory infections in children

A study conducted in Mongolian schoolchildren, all of whom had low blood levels of vitamin D at the start of the study, found that vitamin D supplementation cut the risk of respiratory infections in half.

08/14/2012: First genome-wide association studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome published

Two papers that will appear in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, both receiving advance online release, may help identify gene variants that contribute to the risks of developing obsessive-compulsive disorder or Tourette syndrome.

08/08/2012: Clinical trial results support strategy for reversing type 1 diabetes

A phase I clinical trial has confirmed that use of a generic vaccine to raise levels of an immune system modulator can cause the death of autoimmune cells targeting the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas and temporarily restore insulin secretion in human patients with type 1 diabetes.

08/07/2012: Color-coded labels improve healthy food choices in employees from all backgrounds

A program designed to encourage more healthful food choices through simple color-coded labels and the positioning of items in display cases was equally successful across all categories of employees in the MGH cafeteria.

08/06/2012: Behavioral intervention can reduce tics in adults with Tourette syndrome

Specially designed comprehensive behavioral therapy is more effective than sessions offering patient support and education in helping adults with Tourette syndrome manage their tics – sudden, repetitive motions or vocalizations – according to a new study.

08/01/2012: HIV-infected T cells help transport the virus throughout the body

A new study has discovered one more way that HIV exploits the immune system. Not only does the virus infect and destroy CD4 T cells – which normally direct and support the infection-fighting activities of other immune cells – the virus also appears to use those cells to travel through the body and infect other CD4 T cells.

07/26/2012: Do ovaries continue to produce eggs during adulthood?

A compelling new genetic study tracing the origins of immature egg cells, or 'oocytes', from the embryonic period throughout adulthood adds new information to a growing controversy.

07/26/2012: Controlling monkey brains and behavior with light

Researchers have shown for the first time that they can control the behavior of monkeys by using pulses of blue light to very specifically activate particular brain cells.

07/25/2012: CT angiography speeds emergency diagnosis of heart disease in low-risk patients

Incorporating coronary CT angiography into the initial evaluation of low-risk patients coming to hospital emergency departments with chest pain appears to reduce the time patients spend in the hospital without incurring additional costs or exposing patients to significant risks.

07/23/2012: Aspirin protects against Barrett's esophagus

Aspirin use appears to reduce the risk of Barrett's esophagus, the largest known risk factor for esophageal cancer.

07/22/2012: Increased cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients may relate to arterial inflammation

The elevated risk of cardiovascular disease seen in patients infected with HIV appears to be associated with increased inflammation within the arteries, according to a study in a special issue of JAMA published in conjunction with the International AIDS Conference.

07/18/2012: Mouse with human immune system may revolutionize HIV vaccine research

Researchers from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard report that a mouse model with a human immune system accurately reflects the human immune response to HIV infection and has the potential to reduce significantly the time and costs required to test candidate vaccines.

07/09/2012: Choice to use drug-eluting stents has little relation to patients' probable benefit

A new study finds that the use of drug-eluting stents after angioplasty bears little relationship to patients' predicted risk of restenosis (reblockage) of the treated coronary artery, the situation the devices are designed to prevent.

07/04/2012: Tumor microenvironment helps skin cancer cells resist drug treatment

New research by a team from the Broad Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Massachusetts General Hospital suggests that how cancer evade drug treatment may depend on the interplay between tumor cells and their healthy counterparts.

07/01/2012: Potential treatment target identified in an animal model of pancreatic cancer

Detailed analysis of genes expressed in circulating tumor cells – cells that break off from solid tumors and travel through the bloodstream – has identified a potential treatment target in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

06/27/2012: Immune response to heart attack worsens atherosclerosis, increases future risk

A heart attack doesn't just damage heart muscle tissue by cutting off its blood supply, it also sets off an inflammatory cascade that worsens underlying atherosclerosis, actively increasing the risk for a future heart attack, a new study finds.

06/26/2012: Tiny magnetic coils modulate neural activity, may be safer for deep-brain implants

Magnetic fields generated by microscopic devices implanted into the brain may be able to modulate brain-cell activity and reduce symptoms of several neurological disorders.

06/24/2012: Brain structure helps guide behavior by anticipating changing demands

A study from MGH researchers finds that a structure deep within the brain, believed to play an important role in regulating conscious control of goal-directed behavior, helps to optimize responses to changing conditions by predicting how difficult upcoming tasks will be.

06/12/2012: In the Hospital, the Noisy Hospital, the Patient Sleeps Tonight?

According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, MGH and Cambridge Health Alliance, certain noises in a common hospital setting can disrupt sleep and negatively affect brain activity and cardiovascular function.

06/11/2012: Brain area identified that determines distance from which sound originates

Researchers at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a portion of the brain responsible for determining how far away a sound originates, a process not relying solely on how loud the sound is.

06/10/2012: Natural HIV control may rely on sequence of T cell receptor protein

The rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection with their immune system alone appears to depend – at least partially – on specific qualities of the immune system's killer T cells and not on how many of those cells are produced.

05/24/2012: New clues about cancer cell metabolism emerge

Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital have produced the first large-scale atlas of cancer metabolism, which points to a key role for the smallest amino acid, glycine, in cancer cell proliferation.

05/23/2012: Study supports urate protection against Parkinson's disease, hints at novel mechanism

Use of the antioxidant urate to protect against the neurodegeneration caused by Parkinson's disease appears to rely on more than urate's ability to protect against oxidative damage.

05/21/2012: Donor aortic graft improves reconstruction after partial laryngectomy

MGH surgeons have developed a new technique for reconstructing the larynx after surgery for advanced cancer. The approach uses cryopreserved aortas from deceased donors to replace removed larynx tissue and allows some patients to avoid a permanent tracheotomy and maintain voice and swallowing function.

05/21/2012: Study finds surgical residents often fatigued

A study involving 27 orthopedic surgery residents suggests that surgical residents are often fatigued during their awake time, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Surgery, a JAMA Network publication.

05/16/2012: People with paralysis control robotic arms using brain-computer interface

A new study in Nature reports that two people with tetraplegia were able to reach for and grasp objects in three-dimensional space using robotic arms that they controlled directly with brain activity.

05/16/2012: Raising HDL not a sure route to countering heart disease

A new paper published online in The Lancet challenges the assumption that raising a person’s HDL — the so-called “good cholesterol” — will necessarily lower the risk of a heart attack.

05/15/2012: All cancer cells are not created equal

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers suggests that specific populations of tumor cells have different roles in the process by which tumors make new copies of themselves and grow.

05/14/2012: Laxative-free colon screening procedure may be as accurate as standard colonoscopy in detecting high-risk polyps

A CT-scan-based form of virtual colonoscopy that does not require laxative preparation appears to be as effective as standard colonoscopy in identifying the intestinal polyps most likely to become cancerous.

05/07/2012: Brief training program improves resident physicians’ empathy with patients

Resident physicians' participation in a brief training program designed to increase empathy with their patients produced significant improvement in how patients perceived their interactions with the residents.

04/19/2012: Researchers discover new genes contributing to autism, genetic links between neurodevelopment and psychiatric disorders

A new approach to investigating hard-to-find chromosomal abnormalities has identified 33 genes associated with autism and related disorders, 22 for the first time. Several of these genes also appear to be altered in different ways in individuals with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

04/16/2012: Adolescents can benefit from 12-step involvement

An assessment of 12-step meetings and recommended activities has found that attendance, participation, and finding a sponsor promote greater abstinence among adolescents.

04/12/2012: Research teams discover cellular system for detecting and responding to poisons and pathogens

Two MGH-based research teams, along with a group from the University of California at San Diego, have discovered that animals have a previously unknown system for detecting and responding to pathogens and toxins.

04/09/2012: Rapid method of assembling new gene-editing tool could revolutionize genetic research

Development of a new way to make a powerful tool for altering gene sequences should greatly increase the ability of researchers to knock out or otherwise alter the expression of any gene they are studying.

04/09/2012: Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines

Combining two strategies designed to improve the results of cancer treatment – antiangiogenesis drugs and nanomedicines – may only be successful if the smallest nanomedicines are used.

04/05/2012: Recovery from propofol anesthesia may be sped by use of common stimulant

The ability of the commonly used stimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) to speed recovery from general anesthesia appears to apply both to the inhaled gas isoflurane, as previously reported, and to the intravenous drug propofol.

04/05/2012: Big advance against cystic fibrosis

MGH researchers have taken a critical step in making possible the discovery in the relatively near future of a drug to control cystic fibrosis, a fatal lung disease that claims about 500 lives each year, with 1,000 new cases diagnosed annually.

04/04/2012: DNA sequencing consortium unveils patterns of mutations in autism

A consortium led by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and six other organizations has taken a step toward addressing the genetic component of autism by searching for mutations in the fraction of the human genome that codes for proteins.

03/30/2012: Study supports using virtual environment to teach mind/body techniques

A small study from MGH researchers found that online virtual communities may be an effective way to train patients in meditation and other mind/body techniques. The ability to learn and practice approaches that elicit the relaxation response in a virtual environment could help surmount several barriers that can restrict participation.

03/29/2012: Mass. General-led study reveals simple structure underlying complexity of the primate brain

An MGH research team has discovered a remarkably simple organizational structure in the brains of humans and other primates, finding that the pathways carrying neural signals through the brain are arranged not in a disorganized tangle but in a curved, three-dimensional grid

03/28/2012: The path to personalized cancer treatment

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have profiled genetic changes in cancer with drug sensitivity in order to develop a personalized approach to cancer treatments.

03/25/2012: Genetics of flu susceptibility

A genetic finding could help explain why influenza becomes a life-threating disease to some people while it has only mild effects in others.

03/20/2012: Taking vitamin E does not impact women’s heart failure risk

Taking vitamin E supplements does not increase or decrease heart failure risk among women, according to a study led by MGH physician Claudia Chae, MD.

03/08/2012: Deeper view of HIV reveals impact of early mutations

Mutations in HIV that develop during the first few weeks of infection may play a critical role in undermining a successful early immune response, a finding that reveals the importance of vaccines targeting regions of the virus that are less likely to mutate.

03/07/2012: Experimental drug reduces cortisol levels, improves symptoms in Cushing's disease

A new investigational drug significantly reduced urinary cortisol levels and improved symptoms of Cushing's disease in the largest clinical study of this endocrine disorder ever conducted.

03/07/2012: Diabetes drug halts atherosclerosis progression in HIV-infected patients

Treatment with the common diabetes drug metformin appears to prevent progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV.

03/01/2012: Study reveals how anesthetic isoflurane induces Alzheimer's-like changes in mammalian brains

The association of the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane with Alzheimer's-disease-like changes in mammalian brains may by caused by the drug's effects on mitochondria, the structures in which most cellular energy is produced.

02/29/2012: Ragon Institute study finds HIV-specific CD4 cells that control viral levels

A subpopulation of the immune cells targeted by HIV may play an important role in controlling viral loads after initial infection, potentially helping to determine how quickly infection will progress.

02/26/2012: Mass. General researchers isolate egg-producing stem cells from adult human ovaries

MGH researchers have isolated egg-producing stem cells from the ovaries of reproductive age women and shown these cells can produce what appear to be normal egg cells or oocytes.

02/21/2012: Study finds some insulin production in long-term type 1 diabetes

Massachusetts General Hospital research has found that insulin production may persist for decades after the onset of type 1 diabetes. Beta cell functioning also appears to be preserved in some patients years after apparent loss of pancreatic function.

02/16/2012: MGH Cancer Center team identifies potential treatment target for KRAS-mutated colon cancer

Researchers from the MGH Cancer Center have identified a new potential strategy for treating colon tumors driven by mutations in the KRAS gene, which usually resist both conventional and targeted treatments.

02/14/2012: Vitamin D treatment not found to reduce cardiovascular abnormalities in kidney disease patients

Almost a year's treatment with a vitamin D compound did not alleviate key structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with kidney disease and cardiac enlargement.

02/10/2012: EEG pattern reflects brain's shift into low-energy, protective mode

A distinctive pattern of brain activity associated with conditions including deep anesthesia, coma and congenital brain disorders appears to represent the brain's shift into a protective, low-activity state in response to reduced metabolic energy.

02/08/2012: Some physicians do not agree with, uphold standards on communication with patients

A significant minority of physicians responding to a national survey disagreed with or admitted not upholding accepted standards of professionalism for open and honest communication with patients.

02/06/2012: Mass. General, Jackson Laboratory researchers find clues to common birth defect in gene expression data

Researchers at MassGeneral Hospital for Children, The Jackson Laboratory and other institutes have uncovered 27 new candidate genes for congenital diaphragmatic hernia, a common and often deadly birth defect.

02/01/2012: Blood test accurately distinguishes depressed patients from healthy controls

The initial assessment of a blood test to help diagnose major depressive disorder indicates it may become a useful clinical tool. A team including MGH researchers reports that analyzing levels of nine biomarkers accurately distinguished patients diagnosed with depression from control participants without significant false-positive results.

01/31/2012: Mass. General study defines a new genetic subtype of lung cancer

MGH Cancer Center investigators have defined the role of a recently identified gene abnormality – rearrangements in the ROS1 gene – in non-small-cell lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. They also show that these tumors can be treated with crizotinib and describe the remarkable response of one patient to such treatment.

01/19/2012: Color-coding, rearranging food products improves healthy choices in hospital cafeteria

A simple program involving color-coded food labeling and adjusting the way food items are positioned in display cases was successful in encouraging more healthful food choices in a large hospital cafeteria.

01/18/2012: Novel gene mutations associated with bile duct cancer

Investigators at the MGH Cancer Center have identified a new genetic signature associated with bile duct cancer, a usually deadly tumor for which effective treatment currently is limited.

01/16/2012: Combining two anti-HER2 drugs may provide better preoperative breast cancer treatment

Using two drugs that inhibit the growth factor HER2 for preoperative treatment of early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer appears to have better results than treatment with a single agent.

01/15/2012: Mass. General researchers find novel way to prevent drug-induced liver injury

MGH investigators have developed a novel strategy to protect the liver from drug-induced injury and improve associated drug safety. The team reports that inhibition of a type of cell-to-cell communication can protect against the damage caused by liver-toxic drugs such as acetaminophen.

01/12/2012: Newly identified type of immune cell may be important protector against sepsis

Investigators in the MGH Center for Systems Biology have discovered a previously unknown type of immune cell, a B cell that can produce the important growth factor GM-CSF, which stimulates many other immune cells. They also found that these novel cells may help protect against the overwhelming, life-threatening immune reaction known as sepsis.

01/11/2012: Participating in marathons, half-marathons not found to increase risk of cardiac arrest

A new study finds that participating in these races actually is associated with a relatively low risk of cardiac arrest, compared to other forms of athletics. The study also identifies bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation as a key factor in patient survival.

01/10/2012: How can pediatric HIV be eliminated in Zimbabwe?

Eliminating new infant HIV infections in Zimbabwe will require not only improved access to antiretroviral medications but also support to help HIV-infected mothers continue taking their medication and safely reduce or eliminate breastfeeding, according to study led by MGH investigators.

12/19/2011: What makes patients complex? Ask their primary care physicians

Being able to define and measure patient complexity has important implications for how care is organized, how physicians and health care systems are paid, and how resources are allocated. A study by MGH researchers finds that primary care physicians define patient complexity using more factors than are used in common approaches.

12/19/2011: Commentary calls for greater awareness of Internet pharmacies' role in prescription drug abuse

In a commentary in the December 20 Annals of Internal Medicine, investigators from MGH, the University of Southern California, and the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University describe the probable contribution of Internet pharmacies to prescription drug abuse and outline potential strategies for addressing the problem.

12/18/2011: Increased expression of regulatory enzyme may protect against neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease

Treatment that increases brain levels of an important regulatory enzyme may slow the loss of brain cells that characterizes Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

12/07/2011: Traumatic injury sets off a "genomic storm" in immune system pathways

Serious traumatic injuries, including major burns, set off a "genomic storm" in human immune cells, altering around 80 percent of the cells' normal gene expression patterns.

12/01/2011: Mass. General study finds amplification of multiple cell-growth genes in some brain tumors

A small percentage of the deadly brain tumors called glioblastomas, which usually resist treatment with drugs targeting mutations in cell-growth genes, appears to contain extra copies of two or three of these genes at the same time. The surprising discovery has major implications for the understanding of tumor biology and for targeted cancer therapies.

11/29/2011: Growth Hormone Increases Bone Formation in Obese Women

In a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, growth hormone replacement for six months was found to increase bone formation in abdominally obese women.

11/24/2011: Rebuilding the Brain’s Circuitry

Neuron transplants have repaired brain circuitry and substantially normalized function in mice with a brain disorder, an advance indicating that key areas of the mammalian brain are more reparable than was widely believed.

11/20/2011: Novel ALS drug slows symptom progression, reduces mortality in phase 2 trial

Treatment with dexpramipexole – a novel drug believed to prevent dysfunction of mitochondria, the subcellular structures that provide most of a cell's energy – appears to slow symptom progression in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also called Lou Gehrig's disease.

11/15/2011: Denosumab delays development of prostate cancer bone metastasis

An international clinical trial has found that treatment with a drug that suppresses the normal breakdown of bone can delay the development of bone metastases in men with prostate cancer.

11/13/2011: Newly identified gene mutation adds to melanoma risk

A major international study has identified a novel gene mutation that appears to increase the risk of both inherited and sporadic cases of malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. The identified mutation occurs in the gene encoding MITF, a transcription factor that induces the production of several important proteins in melanocytes, the cells in which melanoma originates.

11/06/2011: Combined arterial imaging technology reveals both structural and metabolic details

A new device that combines two microimaging technologies can reveal both the detailed anatomy of arterial linings and biological activities that, in coronary arteries, could indicate the risk of heart attacks or the formation of clots in arterial stents.

10/17/2011: Biomarker-guided heart failure treatment significantly reduces complications

Adding regular testing for blood levels of a biomarker of cardiac distress to standard care for the most common form of heart failure may significantly reduce the incidence of cardiovascular complications, a new MGH study finds.

10/09/2011: Novel technique uses RNA interference to block inflammation

MGH researchers – along with collaborators from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals – have found a way to block, in an animal model, the damaging inflammation that contributes to many disease conditions.

10/06/2011: Expression of pluripotency-associated gene marks many types of adult stem cells

Investigators at the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have found that Sox2 – one of the transcription factors used in the conversion of adult stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells – is expressed in many adult tissues where it had not been previously observed.

10/05/2011: Health Affairs article focuses on health care disparities facing people with disabilities

In the October issue of Health Affairs, Lisa Iezzoni, MD, director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH, analyzes available information on disparities affecting people with disabilities and highlights barriers that continue to restrict their access to health services.

10/03/2011: Biomarker for Huntington's disease identified

In a new research paper BWH and MGH researchers identify a transcriptional biomarker that may assist in the monitoring of Huntington's disease activity and in the evaluation of new medications.

09/27/2011: Saw palmetto no better than placebo in relieving prostate symptoms, even at high doses

Long-term administration of the dietary supplement saw palmetto, even at three times the usual dose, did not reduce symptoms of prostate enlargement significantly better than placebo in a large group of middle-aged men.

09/21/2011: Common stimulant may speed recovery from general anesthesia

Administration of the commonly used stimulant drug methylphenidate was able to speed recovery from general anesthesia in an animal study conducted at MGH. The report is the first demonstration in mammals of what could be a safe and effective way to induce arousal from general anesthesia.

09/12/2011: Social contacts, self-confidence crucial to successful recovery through Alcoholics Anonymous

Among the many ways that participation in Alcoholics Anonymous helps its members stay sober, two appear to be most important – spending more time with individuals who support efforts towards sobriety and increased confidence in the ability to maintain abstinence in social situations.

09/11/2011: International study identifies new gene targets for hypertension treatment

A new report from MGH scientists and colleagues around the world finds that common variants in 28 regions of DNA are associated with blood pressure in human patients. Most of the identified regions were completely unsuspected, and several may lead to a totally new class of hypertension drugs.

09/05/2011: Study confirms that living with a smoker increases absenteeism in school children

Children who live in households where they are exposed to tobacco smoke miss more days of school than do children living in smoke-free homes. A report from MGH investigators also finds such children have higher rates of respiratory illnesses caused by second-hand smoke and details the probable economic costs of increased their school absences.

08/21/2011: Imaging probe allows noninvasive detection of dangerous heart-valve infection

A novel imaging probe developed by MGH investigators may make it possible to diagnose accurately a dangerous infection of the heart valves

08/17/2011: Most physicians will face malpractice claims, but risk of making payment is low

While most U.S. physicians will face a malpractice lawsuit at some time in their careers, a new study finds, the vast majority of those suits will not result in payment to a plaintiff. The report provides the most comprehensive analysis of the risk of malpractice claims by specialty in more than two decades.

08/10/2011: Could an 'ankle hotline' relieve strain on health care demands?

MGH investigators suggest that – since strains and sprains, which account for over a third of lower extremity injuries treated at emergency departments, are not life-threatening – telephone triage and scheduled care appointments might be a better use of precious emergency healthcare resources.

08/03/2011: Natural killer cells participate in immune response against HIV

A new study shows for the first time that natural killer cells, which are part of the body's first-line defence against infection, can contribute to the immune response against HIV. The findings may help develop new preventive or treatment strategies.

08/02/2011: Pilot study suggests new approach to treat preeclampsia

A novel therapy that reduces elevated blood levels of a potentially toxic protein in women with preeclampsia, a dangerous complication of pregnancy, may someday address the therapeutic dilemma posed by the condition – balancing life-threatening risks to the mother with the dangers that early delivery poses to an immature fetus.

07/13/2011: Taking out a cancer’s co-dependency

Scientists at the Broad Institute and MGH have discovered a novel compound that selectively blocks the ability of cancer cells to block the oxidative stress produced by rapid tumor growth, killing cancer cells more effectively than a currently used chemotherapy drug.

07/13/2011: Large clinical trial shows short-term hormone therapy plus radiation increases survival for men with early-stage prostate cancer

Short-term hormone therapy given in combination with radiation therapy for men with early-stage prostate cancer increases their chance of living longer and not dying from the disease, compared with patients who receive the same radiation therapy alone.

07/12/2011: Changes in family history of cancer can impact screening recommendations

A multi-institutional research team has found that details of a family history of cancer – which can affect recommendations for screening examinations such as colonoscopies and mammograms – frequently change in adults aged 30 to 50.

07/10/2011: High-resolution imaging technology reveals cellular details of coronary arteries

Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at MGH have developed a one-micrometer-resolution version of the intravascular imaging technology optical coherence tomography that can reveal cellular and subcellular features of coronary artery disease.

07/07/2011: Study suggests new strategy to prevent infertility, birth defects

A strategy that has been shown to reduce age-related health problems in several animal studies may also combat a major cause of age-associated infertility and birth defects.

07/01/2011: Mass. General team identifies new class of antiangiogenesis drugs

MGH researchers have discovered the first of an entirely new class of antiangiogenesis drugs – agents that interfere with the development of blood vessels. The compound, derived from a South American tree, uses a novel mechanism to block blood vessel formation.

06/24/2011: ICER Releases Comprehensive Appraisal of Management Options for Patients with Low Back Disorders

A comprehensive appraisal of management options for patients with low-back disorders was released today by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, based within the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment.

06/24/2011: Mass. General Hospital, Iacocca Foundation announce promising results of Phase I diabetes trial

Promising results of a Phase I clinical trial of the generic drug BCG to treat advanced type I diabetes are being announced today at the American Diabetes Association scientific sessions. An MGH research team is describing the apparent reproduction in human patients of a mechanism that reversed type 1 diabetes in a mouse model.

06/23/2011: Rare genetic disorder provides unique insight into Parkinson’s disease

MGH investigators may have found the mechanism behind a previously reported link between the rare genetic condition Gaucher disease and the common neurodegenerative disorder Parkinson's disease.

06/21/2011: Scientists reveal HIV weakness

In a new finding that may allow vaccine designers to sidestep HIV's rapid mutation rate, researchers at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have identified sections of an HIV protein where mutations would actually undermine the virus’ fitness – its ability to survive and reproduce.

06/12/2011: Single GFP-expressing cell is basis of living laser device

Two investigators at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a living laser, in which a single cell genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein is used to amplify photons into nanosecond-long pulses of laser light

06/06/2011: Women's risk of heart disease after gestational diabetes differs by race

New research finds that gestational diabetes, or pregnancy-related diabetes, may not raise the risk of heart disease independent of other cardiovascular risk factors except in certain high-risk populations.

06/05/2011: Athletic girls more likely to have impaired bone structure if menstrual cycle stops

Young female athletes who have stopped menstruating have a weakening in the quality of their bone structure that may predispose them to breaking a bone, despite getting plenty of weight-bearing exercise, a new study finds.

06/04/2011: Anorexic girls have increased bone density after physiological estrogen treatment

Estrogen therapy improves low bone density in teenage girls with anorexia nervosa when given as a patch or at an oral dose close to the form or amount the body makes naturally.

05/31/2011: Long-term study data supports association between childhood ADHD and substance abuse risk

An analysis of more than 10 years of data confirms that ADHD alone significantly increases the risk of future cigarette smoking and substance abuse in both boys and girls.

05/22/2011: The Dance of the Cells: A Minuet or a Mosh?

The physical forces that guide how cells manage to get from place to place inside the living body are poorly understood. Now scientists have for the first time devised a way to measure these forces during collective cellular migration.

05/17/2011: Deer tick bacteria DNA in joint fluid not reliable marker of active lyme arthritis

New research shows that PCR testing for Borrelia burgdorferi DNA—the spirochetal bacteria transmitted by deer ticks—in joint fluid may confirm the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, but is not a reliable indicator for active joint infection in patients whose arthritis persists.

05/12/2011: Increase in Internet access parallels growth in prescription drug abuse

Increasing access to rogue online pharmacies that dispense medications without a doctor's prescription may be an important factor behind the rapid increase in the abuse of prescription drugs.

05/11/2011: Mild obesity appears to improve survival in ALS patients

Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be an exception to the rule that being overweight is a health hazard. In a retrospective study of over 400 ALS patients, MGH researchers found that those who were mildly obese survived longer than patients who were normal weight, underweight or even overweight.

05/09/2011: Important step in breakdown of HIV proteins is critical to immune system recognition, destruction of infected cells

Researchers at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have found that – as HIV proteins are broken down within cells, a process that should help label infected cells for destruction – the stability of resulting protein segments varies greatly, variations that may change how well cells are recognized by the immune system.

05/05/2011: Combination of ADHD and poor emotional control runs in families

A subgroup of adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also exhibit excessive emotional reactions to everyday occurrences, and this combination of ADHD and emotional reactivity appears to run in families, an MGH study finds.

05/01/2011: Children held captive in smoky vehicles

Study led by MGHfC investigator Jonathan Winickoff, MD, MPH, finds that children of parents who smoke are often exposed to tobacco in their parent's cars.

04/21/2011: Meditation may help the brain "turn down the volume" on distractions

The positive effects of mindfulness meditation on pain and working memory may result from an improved ability to regulate a crucial brain wave called the alpha rhythm, which is thought to "turn down the volume" on distracting information.

04/19/2011: Severe obesity not seen to increase risk of depression in teens

According to a new study, severely obese adolescents are no more likely to be depressed than normal weight peers. The study, which has been released online in the Journal of Adolescent Health, did find that white adolescents may be somewhat more vulnerable to psychological effects of obesity.

04/13/2011: Differences in brain structure indicate risk for developing Alzheimer's disease

Subtle differences in brain anatomy among older individuals with normal cognitive skills may be able to predict both the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in the following decade and how quickly symptoms of dementia would develop.

03/30/2011: Alzheimer's-like brain changes found in cognitively normal elders with amyloid plaques

Researchers using two brain-imaging technologies have found that apparently normal older individuals with brain deposits of amyloid beta – the primary constituent of the plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients – also had changes in brain structure similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

03/27/2011: Advanced technology reveals activity of single neurons during seizures

The first study to examine the activity of hundreds of individual human brain cells during seizures has found that seizures begin with extremely diverse neuronal activity, contrary to the classic view that they are characterized by massively synchronized activity.

03/24/2011: BrainGate neural interface system reaches 1,000-day performance milestone

An investigational implanted system being developed to translate brain signals toward control of assistive devices has allowed a woman with paralysis to accurately control a computer cursor at 2.7 years after implantation, providing a key demonstration that neural activity can be read out and converted into action for an unprecedented length of time.

03/23/2011: Mass. General study reveals how lung cancers evolve in response to targeted treatment

A detailed analysis of lung tumors that became resistant to targeted therapy drugs has revealed two previously unreported resistance mechanisms. The report also describes how the cellular nature of some tumors can change in response to treatment and finds how resistance-conferring mutations can disappear after treatment is discontinued.

03/23/2011: Epigenomic findings illuminate veiled variants

Genes make up only a tiny percentage of the human genome, but the rest may hold vital clues about the genetic origins of disease. Using a new mapping strategy, a research team has begun to assign meaning to the regions beyond our genes and has revealed how minute changes in these regions might be connected to common diseases.

03/21/2011: Most Parents Support Testing Children for Tobacco Smoke Exposure

A new study, to be published in the April 2011 issue of Pediatrics, shows that 60 percent of parents -- smoking and non-smoking -- indicate that they would like their children tested for tobacco smoke exposure during pediatric visits.

03/20/2011: Metabolite levels may be able to improve diabetes risk prediction

Measuring the levels of small molecules in the blood may be able to identify individuals at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes as much as a decade before symptoms of the disorder appear.

03/15/2011: Current projections greatly underestimate impact of Haitian cholera epidemic

A new mathematical model of the Haitian cholera epidemic, based on current knowledge about the transmission and course of the disease, finds that current projections regarding the size and extent of the epidemic may greatly underestimate the eventual number of cases.

03/14/2011: Tumor suppressor blocks viral growth in natural HIV controllers

Elevated levels of p21, a protein best known as a cancer fighter, may be involved in the ability of a few individuals to control HIV infection with their immune system alone.

03/09/2011: Aspirin's ability to protect against colorectal cancer may depend on risk-associated inflammatory pathways

The reduced risk of colorectal cancer associated with taking aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be limited to individuals already at risk because of elevations in a specific inflammatory factor in the blood.

03/07/2011: Increased, mandatory screenings help identify more kids with emotional/behavioral problems

An MGHfC study published in the March 2011 Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine shows that Massachusetts' new court-ordered mental health screening and intervention program led to more children being identified as behaviorally and emotionally at risk.

03/06/2011: International collaborative identifies 13 new heart-disease-associated gene sites

An international research collaboration has identified 13 new gene sites associated with the risk of coronary artery disease and validated 10 sites found in previous studies. Several of the novel sites discovered do not appear to relate to known risk factors, suggesting previously unsuspected mechanisms for cardiovascular disease.

03/04/2011: MGH Orthopaedic Surgeon’s Breakthrough Findings Honored with Research Award

Dr. Young-Min Kwon honored with Kappa Delta Investigator Award for outstanding research in Orthopaedic surgery.

03/03/2011: Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

A new study finds that a brain rhythm considered the hallmark of wakefulness not only persists inconspicuously during sleep but also signifies an individual's vulnerability to disturbance by the outside world.

02/22/2011: Protective strategy shields primate ovaries from radiation-therapy-induced damage

A strategy developed by MGH researchers to shield the ovaries of female mammals from the damaging effects of radiation and chemotherapy has passed an important milestone with the report that brief pretreatment with an FDA-approved drug preserved the fertility of female rhesus monkeys exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation.

02/16/2011: Enzyme helps prepare lung tissue for metastatic development

An MGH study has identified a new role for an important enzyme in preparing lung tissue for the development of metastases. The findings may help development of strategies to slow or halt the process.

02/10/2011: Tumor microvesicles reveal detailed genetic information

The MGH research team that previously discovered tumor-associated RNA in tiny membrane-enclosed sacs released into the bloodstream by cancer cells has now found that these microvesicles also contain segments of tumor DNA, including so-called "jumping genes" that copy and insert themselves into other areas of the genome.

02/03/2011: Homeless people without enough to eat are more likely to be hospitalized

Homeless people who do not get enough to eat use hospitals and emergency rooms at very high rates, according to a new study from MGH and Boston Health Care for the Homeless.

02/02/2011: Generic drug may improve the effectiveness of cancer nanotherapies

Low doses of an inexpensive, FDA-approved hypertension medication may improve the results of nanotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment.

01/26/2011: Growth-factor-containing nanoparticles accelerate healing of chronic wounds

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a novel system for delivery of growth factors to chronic wounds such as pressure sores and diabetic foot ulcers.

01/21/2011: Mindfulness meditation training changes brain structure in 8 weeks

Participating in an 8-week mindfulness meditation program appears to make measurable changes in brain regions associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress.

01/21/2011: CT scanning aids rapid diagnosis, treatment planning for abdominal pain

The use of CT scanning to evaluate abdominal pain in emergency departments can help physicians arrive at a diagnosis quickly and decisively.

01/18/2011: Massachusetts General Hospital leading nationwide, comparative study of common bipolar medications

The Massachusetts General Hospital Bipolar Clinic and Research Program is launching a 10-site nationwide trial evaluating the real-world advantages and disadvantages of second generation mood stabilizing medications compared to lithium.

01/13/2011: Overexpression of repetitive DNA sequences discovered in common tumor cells

MGH Cancer Center researchers have discovered a previously unknown feature of common tumor cells – massive overexpression of satellite repeats, which are DNA sequences that do not code for proteins. The findings may improve understanding of tumor development and provide a new cancer biomarker.

01/10/2011: Statin risks may outweigh benefits for patients with a history of brain hemorrhage

A computer decision model suggests that for patients with a history of bleeding within the brain, the risk of recurrence associated with statin treatment may outweigh the benefit of the drug in preventing cardiovascular disease, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the May print issue of Archives of Neurology.

01/03/2011: Mass. General Hospital enters collaboration to develop new approach to capturing circulating tumor cells

MGH has entered into a collaborative agreement with Veridex LLC to establish a center of excellence in research on circulating tumor cell technologies.

12/29/2010: Uncovering the neurobiological basis of general anesthesia

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, author of a New England Journal of Medicine review article, lays out a conceptual framework for understanding general anesthesia by discussing its relation to sleep and coma.

12/27/2010: Newborns with low vitamin D levels at increased risk for respiratory infections

Vitamin D levels of newborn babies appear to predict their risk of respiratory infections during infancy and the occurrence of wheezing during early childhood, but not the risk of developing asthma.

12/27/2010: Structure deep within the brain may contribute to a rich, varied social life

Scientists have discovered that the amygdala, a small almond shaped structure deep within the temporal lobe, is important to a rich and varied social life among humans.

12/22/2010: Mortality rates are an unreliable metric for assessing hospital quality, study finds

A comparative analysis found wide disparities in the results of four common measures of hospital-wide mortality rates, with competing methods yielding both higher- and lower-than-expected rates for the same hospitals during the same year.

12/14/2010: The effects of spirituality in Alcoholics Anonymous on alcohol dependence

A new study shows that, as attendance at AA meetings increases, so do the participants' spiritual beliefs, especially in those individuals who had low spirituality at the beginning of the study.

12/13/2010: Apartment-dwelling children in nonsmoking units still exposed to tobacco

A new study from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and the University of Rochester Medical Center shows significant evidence of tobacco smoke exposure in the blood of children who live in multi-unit housing.

12/12/2010: MGH researchers develop faster method of engineering zinc-finger nucleases

A team led by MGH researchers has developed a faster way to engineer synthetic enzymes that target specific DNA sequences for inactivation, repair or alteration.

12/09/2010: Cholera strain in Haiti matches bacteria from South Asia

A team of researchers has determined that the strain of cholera erupting in Haiti matches bacterial samples from South Asia and not those from Latin America. The scientists conclude that the bacteria introduced into Haiti most likely came from an infected human, contaminated food or other item from outside of Latin America.

12/06/2010: Psychotic-like symptoms associated with poor outcomes in patients with depression

Among patients with depression, the presence of symptoms associated with bipolar disorder does not appear to be associated with treatment resistance, according to a study from MGH investigators. However, many patients with depression also report psychotic-like symptoms, such as hearing voices or believing they are being spied on or plotted against, and those patients are less likely to respond to treatment.

12/01/2010: Tumors bring their own support cells when forming metastases

A new study from MGH Cancer Center researchers finds that circulating tumor cells bring along from the original tumor site noncancerous cells that facilitate the development of metastases.

11/30/2010: Belly Fat Puts Women at Risk for Osteoporosis

A study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America found that having too much internal abdominal fat may have a damaging effect on bone health.

11/23/2010: Probiotics under study as treatment for IBS and depression

A new study will measure the ability of probiotic bacteria GanedenBC30 (Bacillus coagulans GB1-30, 6086) to help people diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and major depressive disorder (MDD).

11/22/2010: ICER Publishes Systematic Review of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography

A systematic review of the use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography for patients with suspected coronary artery disease found that the technology has high diagnostic accuracy but was unable to determine its effectiveness in supporting clinical decision-making or improving patient outcomes.

11/18/2010: Culturally sensitive treatment model helps bring depressed Chinese immigrants into treatment

A treatment model designed to accommodate the beliefs and concerns of Chinese immigrants increased the percentage of depressed patients entering treatment nearly sevenfold.

11/12/2010: Mathematical model of the life cycle of red blood cells may predict risk of anemia

An MGH physician-researcher and a Harvard University mathematician have collaborated to develop a mathematical model reflecting how red blood cells change during their four-month lifespan. The model uses data from routine blood tests and may be able to predict the development of anemia.

11/10/2010: Romiplostim more effective than standard care for immune thrombocytopenia

A new study finds that an FDA-approved drug to treat the rare autoimmune disorder immune thromobocytopenia (ITP) is more effective than earlier medical therapies in helping patients avoid surgical treatment and significantly improving their quality of life.

11/09/2010: Combined Imaging Technologies May Better Identify Cancerous Breast Lesions

By combining optical and x-ray imaging, radiologists may be better able to distinguish cancer from benign lesions in the breast, according to an MGH study.

11/08/2010: Although less prevalent, physician-industry relationships remain common

A new survey finds that, while the number of physicians who report having relationships with pharmaceutical manufacturers or other industrial companies has dropped in recent years, the vast majority of them still maintain such relationships.

11/05/2010: President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists

President Obama today named 85 researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

11/04/2010: Small protein changes may make big difference in natural HIV control

Tiny variants in a protein that alerts the immune system to the presence of infection may underlie the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection without the need for medications.

11/03/2010: Half of those travelling internationally not aware of potential health risks

International travel is the primary way many infections traverse the world. Despite these potential risks, a recent study conducted by the Division of Infectious Diseases found that 46 percent of travelers to resource-limited countries did not seek health advice or vaccinations prior to departure.

10/28/2010: Tighter ethics rules have reduced industrial relationship of NIH scientists

The 2005 ethics rules that govern relationships between researchers within the National Institutes of Health and pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other industrial companies have significantly reduced the prevalence of such collaborations without affecting standard measures of research productivity.

10/28/2010: Study identifies flaws in Medicare prescription drug program

Millions of Medicare recipients have been forcibly reassigned to different prescription drug plans because Part D reimbursements to insurance companies covering low-income patients are lower than the actual costs incurred, according to a study from the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at MGH.

10/27/2010: New targeted lung cancer drug produces 'dramatic' symptom improvement

A clinical trial of a potential new targeted treatment drug has provided powerful evidence that it can halt or reverse the growth of lung tumors characterized by alterations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene.

10/18/2010: Intestinal enzyme helps maintain population of beneficial bacteria

An enzyme that keeps intestinal bacteria out of the bloodstream may also play an important role in maintaining the normal microbial population of the gastrointestinal system.

10/14/2010: Molecular switch controls melanin production, may allow true sunless tanning

Discovery of a molecular switch that turns off the natural process of skin pigmentation may lead to a novel way of protecting the skin – activating the tanning process without exposure to cancer-causing UV radiation.

10/12/2010: Second-generation device more effective in capturing circulating tumor cells

A redesigned version of the CTC-Chip – a microchip-based device for capturing rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – appears to be more effective and should be easier to manufacture than the original. Called the HB-(herringbone) Chip, the new device also may provide more comprehensive and easily accessible data from captured tumor cells.

10/10/2010: Studies provide new insights into the genetics of obesity and fat distribution

An international consortium has made significant inroads into uncovering the genetic basis of obesity by identifying 18 new gene sites associated with overall obesity and 13 that affect fat distribution. The studies include data from nearly a quarter of a million participants, the largest genetic investigation of human traits to date.

09/30/2010: ICER Completes Comprehensive Appraisal of Common Strategies for Atrial Fibrillation Management

A comprehensive appraisal of the management options for the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, prepared by the MGH-based Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, details the comparative clinical effectiveness and value of several strategies for restoring rhythm control and preventing stroke.

09/24/2010: Disparities in heart attack treatment may begin in the emergency room

The well-documented disparities in cardiac care may begin almost as soon as patients arrive at hospital emergency rooms, Mass. General investigators find.

09/15/2010: $40 million awarded to trace human brain's connections

The National Institutes of Health has awarded grants totaling $40 million to map the human brain's connections in high resolution. Better understanding of such connectivity promises improved diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders.

09/14/2010: Present imperfect: Doctors in training work even when ill

Researchers report that three out of five resident physicians responding to a survey came to work in the previous year while sick, possibly exposing their patients and colleagues to suboptimal performance and, in many cases, communicable disease.

09/07/2010: Quality measurement programs could shortchange physicians caring for at-risk patients

Evaluating the quality of care delivered by individual physicians without accounting for such factors as their patients' socioeconomic status or insurance coverage risks undervaluing the work of those caring for a higher proportion of vulnerable patients.

08/30/2010: Microfluidic device allows collection, analysis of hard-to-handle immune cells

A team led by MGH scientists has developed a new microfluidic tool for quickly and accurately isolating neutrophils – the most abundant type of white blood cell – from small blood samples, an accomplishment that could provide information essential to better understanding the immune system's response to traumatic injury.

08/25/2010: Targeted drug leads to rapid regression of metastatic melanoma in patients with mutated BRAF gene

Use of an experimental targeted drug to treat metastatic melanoma tumors with a specific genetic signature was successful in more than 80 percent of patients in a phase 1 clinical trial.

08/25/2010: Grapefruit's bitter taste holds a sweet promise for diabetes therapy

A team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Massachusetts General Hospital report that the antioxident naringenin seems to mimic the actions of other drugs including the anti-diabetic rosiglitazone.

08/24/2010: Cognitive behavior therapy improves symptom control in adult ADHD

Adding cognitive behavioral therapy – an approach that teaches skills for handling life challenges and revising negative thought patterns – to pharmaceutical treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder significantly improved symptom control in adult patients.

08/18/2010: Lung cancer patients receiving palliative care had improved quality of life, extended survival

Integrating palliative care early in the treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer not only improved their mood and quality of life, it also extended their lives.

08/12/2010: Merlin protein found to control liver stem cells, prevent tumor development

A protein known to be involved in a rare hereditary cancer syndrome may have a role in the regulation of liver stem cells and the development of liver cancer.

08/09/2010: Brain rhythm predicts ability to sleep through a noisy night

People who have trouble sleeping in noisy environments often resort to strategies like earplugs or noise-canceling headphones that muffle the sound, but a new study from MGH investigators may lead to ways to block disturbing sounds within the brain.

08/04/2010: Sorting out the genetic and biological links between cholesterol and coronary heart disease

Two papers in the current issue of Nature describe 95 gene variations that contribute to cholesterol and triglyceride levels and reveal the unexpected role of a metabolic pathway in lipid metabolism.

08/04/2010: New drug shown safe, effective in treating hereditary angioedema

Clinical trials from two international research teams have shown that icatibant, a new drug that blocks the action of an inflammatory protein known as bradykinin, is safe and effective in treating acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, a potentially life-threatening condition.

08/04/2010: MicroRNA molecule increases number of blood stem cells, may help improve cancer treatment

MGH investigators have identified a new mechanism that controls the number of the stem cells that give rise to all blood and immune system cells, an advance that may improve treatment of blood system cancers.

07/29/2010: Resting brain activity associated with spontaneous fibromyalgia pain

A recent study from researchers at Mass. General and University of Michigan provides the first direct evidence of linkage between elevated intrinsic (resting-state) brain connectivity and spontaneous pain intensity in patients with fibromyalgia.

07/27/2010: CTC screening for colorectal cancer not cost-effective when reimbursed at same rate as colonoscopy

Computed tomographic colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, is not cost-effective if reimbursed at the same rate as colonoscopy, according to a study from the Institute for Technology Assessment at MGH.

07/19/2010: Reprogrammed cells 'remember,' retain characteristics of their cells of origin

Investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine have confirmed that induced pluripotent stem cells retain some characteristics of the cells from which they were derived, something that could both assist and impede potential clinical and research uses.

07/15/2010: Largest study of genomes and cancer treatments releases first results

The largest study to correlate genetics with response to cancer drugs releases its first results today. The researchers behind the study, based at the MGH Cancer Center and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, describe the responses of 350 cancer samples to 18 anticancer therapeutics.

07/14/2010: Researchers Identify Possible New Treatment for Severe Vasculitis

Investigators have made a major advance in treating people with a rare but devastating disease of blood vessels.

07/13/2010: Many physicians do not accept responsibility to report incompetent, impaired colleagues

More than one-third of surveyed U.S. physicians did not agree that physicians should always report colleagues who are incompetent or impaired by conditions such as substance abuse or mental health disorders. Many also felt unprepared to report or otherwise deal with impaired or incompetent colleagues.

07/09/2010: Universal HIV testing and immediate treatment could reduce but not eliminate HIV/AIDS epidemic

Implementing universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral treatment for infected individuals could have a major impact on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Washington, DC but not halt the epidemic, which a previous report had projected.

07/05/2010: Study finds higher STD rates among users of erectile dysfunction drugs

An analysis of insurance records of more than 1.4 million U.S. men over 40 found that those who used ED drugs were more likely to have sexually transmitted diseases than were non-users.

06/30/2010: When food intake stops, enzyme turns off production of fats, cholesterol

MGH investigators have found that an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism also helps to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol under conditions of fasting. The findings could lead to new approaches to treating conditions involving elevated cholesterol and lipid levels.

06/28/2010: Mass. General Hospital, Iacocca Foundation announce completion of Phase I diabetes trial

MGH and the Iacocca Foundation announce today the completion of the Phase I BCG clinical trial in type 1 diabetes, as well as the submission of all safety reports to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the MGH data safety monitoring boards.

06/16/2010: Defects in immune system enzyme may increase risk of autoimmune disorders

A multi-institutional research team has found that rare variants in the gene coding an enzyme that controls the activity of a key immune cell occur more frequently in individuals with autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

06/15/2010: Combined BRAF-targeted and immunotherapy shows promise for melanoma treatment

Combined targeted therapy against the BRAF/MAPK pathway with immunotherapy shows promise as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of melanoma, according to results of a preclinical study by MGH researchers.

06/14/2010: Study finds heart and circulation ultrasound can better determine heart disease risk in obese women

Researchers found that heart and circulation ultrasounds are an important tool in assessing the risk of heart disease in women who are obese or have metabolic syndrome.

06/14/2010: Novel ultrasound technique can help doctors detect heart muscle damage in chemotherapy patients

Mass General researchers unveiled a non-invasive ultrasound technique to help detect heart muscle damage in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

06/13/2010: Mass. General researchers develop functional, transplantable rat liver grafts

A team led by researchers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a technique that someday may allow growth of transplantable replacement livers.

06/09/2010: Heart Attacks Declined 24 Percent in Kaiser Permanente Northern California Since 2000

Heart attacks declined by 24 percent within a large, ethnically diverse, community-based population since 2000, and the relative incidence of serious heart attacks that do permanent damage declined by 62 percent, according to a study in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

06/09/2010: Genome-wide study identifies factors that may affect vitamin D levels

An international research consortium has identified four common gene variants that are associated with blood levels of vitamin D and with an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency.

06/08/2010: New type of human stem cell may be more easy to manipulate

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine and Harvard Stem Cell Institute have a developed a new type of human pluripotent stem cell that can be manipulated more readily than currently available stem cells. The new cells could be used as better disease models and eventually to repair disease-associated mutations.

06/03/2010: Study finds epigenetic similarities between Wilms tumor cells and normal kidney stem cells

A detailed analysis of the epigenetics – factors controlling when and where genes are expressed – of Wilms tumor reveals striking similarities to stem cells normally found in fetal kidneys. These findings by MGH Cancer Center researchers reveal new cellular pathways critical for Wilms tumor development that may apply to other pediatric cancers.

05/26/2010: Study finds “law-like” patterns in human preference behavior

In a study appearing in the journal PLoS ONE, MGH scientists describe finding mathematical patterns underlying the way individuals unconsciously distribute their preferences regarding approaching or avoiding objects in their environment.

05/26/2010: Detailed metabolic profile gives "chemical snapshot" of the effects of exercise

Using a system that analyzes blood samples with unprecedented detail, a team led by MGH researchers has developed the first "chemical snapshot" of the metabolic effects of exercise.

05/25/2010: Simple Change Results in Fewer Unnecessary Imaging Exams for Patients

A new rule preventing medical support staff from completing orders for outpatient imaging exams that were likely to be negative resulted in a marked decrease in low-yield exams for patients, according to a study appearing in the June issue of Radiology.

05/17/2010: New study characterizes cognitive and anatomic differences in Alzheimer’s disease gene carriers

In the most comprehensive study to date, neurologists have clearly identified significant differences in the ways that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects patients with and without the apolipoprotein E ε4 gene, a known genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disease.

05/14/2010: Homeless adults have significant unmet health care needs

The vast majority of homeless adults surveyed in a national study had trouble accessing at least one type of needed health care service in the preceding year, according to what may be the first broad-based national study of factors related to unmet health needs among homeless people.

05/13/2010: MicroRNA and host gene play key role in regulating cholesterol pathways

MGH researchers have identified tiny segments of RNA that may play an important role in the body's regulation of cholesterol and lipids.

05/11/2010: Many pregnant women not getting enough Vitamin D

Seven out of every ten pregnant women in the United States are not getting enough Vitamin D according to a study from researchers at the University of Colorado Denver and MGH.

05/10/2010: Studies document risks associated with common acid-suppressing medications

Proton pump inhibitors, medications that suppress acid in the stomach, appear to be associated with fractures in postmenopausal women and bacterial infections in many patients.

05/05/2010: New insights into the mystery of natural HIV immunity

Researchers from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard discover how a genetic factor increases the immune system's ability to control HIV.

05/03/2010: Are poor workspace ergonomics causing radiologists pain?

A lack of attention to workspace ergonomics could be to blame for radiologists' musculoskeletal symptoms, including lower back pain, wrist pain, shoulder pain, neck pain, and headaches, according to a study to be presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society 2010 Annual Meeting.

04/27/2010: Long-term anabolic steroid use may weaken heart more than previously thought

Long-term anabolic steroid use may weaken the heart more than previously thought and may increase the risk of heart failure, according to a study led by MGH investigator Aaron Baggish, MD.

04/26/2010: Patients, clinicians favor disclosure of financial ties to industry

MGH investigator Eric Campbell comments on study finding that patients, research participants and journal readers believe financial relationships between medicine and industry should be disclosed.

04/25/2010: Gene silencing may be responsible for induced pluripotent stem cells' limitations

Investigators from the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have found that an important cluster of genes is inactivated in induced pluripotent stem cells — cells generated from adult tissue that have many characteristics of embryonic stem cells — that do not have the full development potential of embryonic stem cells.

04/19/2010: Patients with acne may get electronic follow-up care

Follow-up visits conducted via a secure Web site may result in similar clinical outcomes as in-person visits among patients with acne, according to a report from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

04/18/2010: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cancer Detection and Treatment: What’s On the Horizon

Cancer is a multifaceted disease that requires multiple approaches to diagnosis and management. At the American Association for Cancer Research 101st Annual Meeting 2010, scientists and clinicians will present more than 6,300 abstracts dealing with innovative aspects of biology, technology and emerging therapies.

04/14/2010: Novel artificial pancreas successfully controls blood sugar more than 24 hours

An artificial pancreas system that closely mimics the body's blood sugar control mechanism was able to maintain near-normal glucose levels without causing hypoglycemia in a small group of patients.

04/06/2010: Electronic health record alone may have limited ability to improve quality, costs of care

The implementation of electronic health record systems may not be enough to significantly improve health quality and reduce costs.

04/01/2010: Treatment resistance in some cancer cells may be reversible

The ability of cancer cells to resist treatment with either targeted drug therapies or traditional chemotherapy may, in some cases, result from a transient state of reversible drug "tolerance."

03/31/2010: Improved device provides more rapid, comprehensive analysis of circulating tumor cells

Technical improvements to a microchip-based device for detecting and analyzing tumor cells in the bloodstream are revealing cellular differences that may reflect a tumor's aggressiveness and long-term response to treatment.

03/31/2010: Even highly qualified women in academic medicine paid less than equally qualified men

Women conducting research in the life sciences continue to receive lower levels of compensation than their male counterparts, even at the upper levels of academic and professional accomplishment, according to a study conducted by the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital.

03/25/2010: Massachusetts General Hospital to create international registry for coronary optical coherence tomography

Mass General researchers are spearheading an international effort to study optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging technology that could help doctors identify the vulnerable coronary plaques that cause heart attacks.

03/22/2010: Blacks less likely than whites, Hispanics to get evidence-based stroke care

Blacks hospitalized with the most common type of stroke are less likely than white or Hispanic patients to receive evidence-based stroke care, according to a new study in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

03/21/2010: "Good" cells can go "bad" in a "bad neighborhood"

A new study by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital indicates that “good” cells can become cancerous because of exposure to a “bad” environment within the body — similarly to the way a “good boy” may turn to crime when exposed to the pressures of life in a crime-ridden neighborhood.

03/16/2010: Increased radiation dose does not increase long-term side effects for prostate cancer patients

Boosting the radiation dose given to prostate cancer patients to a level that cut recurrence in half did not increase the severity of side effects reported by patients up to a decade later. Patients also found the impact of continuing side effects on their quality of life to be less bothersome than would be expected, based on earlier studies.

03/02/2010: Alzheimer's-associated protein may be part of the innate immune system

Amyloid-beta protein – the primary constituent of the plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients – may be part of the body's first-line system to defend against infection. In their report in the March 3 issue of PLoS One, a team led by MGH researchers describe their evidence that amyloid-beta protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

03/02/2010: Mass. General Researchers Seek Participants for Parkinson’s Disease Clinical Trial

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are seeking recently diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to participate in a clinical trial investigating whether inosine taken to raise the body’s level of urate — a naturally occurring antioxidant — can be used to slow the progress of PD.

03/01/2010: Adding ECG to health exams may prevent sudden cardiac death in young athletes

A new study by researchers at the MGH Heart Center found the addition of electrocardiogram testing to the standard medical history and physical examination for young athletes may better identify key cardiovascular abnormalities responsible for sports-related sudden death.

03/01/2010: Different fat types can help or hinder obese girls' bone health

According to a new study accepted for publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, obese teenage girls with a greater ratio of visceral fat (fat around internal organs) to subcutaneous fat (fat found just beneath the skin) are likely to have lower bone density than peers with a lower ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat.

02/25/2010: Proton beam therapy shows encouraging long-term outcome for patients with locally advanced sinonasal cancers

Proton beam radiation therapy shows encouraging results for patients with locally advanced sinonasal malignancies, according to a study led by Annie Chan, MD, a radiation oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital.

02/23/2010: Study Should Prove Helpful in Quest for Safer, More Effective Blood Substitutes

A study published in the March 2010 issue of the journal Anesthesiology gives researchers new insights in how to better understand and control a severe side effect of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, often referred to as "artificial blood."

02/23/2010: Combined Mammography and Breast MRI Useful for Some High-Risk Women

Annual breast cancer screening with both mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is likely to be a cost-effective way to improve life expectancy in women with an increased risk of breast cancer.

02/21/2010: Common gene variant may increase risk for a type of cardiac arrhythmia

An international research team has identified a common gene variant associated with a form of the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that is seen in younger individuals with no other heart disease.

02/16/2010: Rates of childhood obesity, chronic health problems increase, but conditions may not persist

A new study confirms that rates of obesity and other chronic health problems have risen in American children in recent years, but it also shows that many children's conditions will improve or resolve over time.

02/14/2010: Shifting cellular energy metabolism may help treat cardiovascular disease

Drugs that target the way cells convert nutrients into energy could offer new approaches to treating a range of conditions including heart attack and stroke. Using a new way to screen for potential drugs, a team of researchers has identified several FDA-approved agents that can shift cellular energy metabolism processes in animals.

02/05/2010: Study finds screening for spinal muscular atrophy not cost effective

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, researchers will unveil findings that show it is not cost effective to screen for spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality and the second most common inherited autosomal recessive disorder.

02/01/2010: Children more likely to visit the dentist if their parents do too

Whether or not children receive regular dental care is strongly associated with their parents' history of seeking dental care. A new report to appear in the journal Pediatrics, which has been released online, is the first to analyze the relationship between parents' and childrens' dental visits in a nationally represntative sample.

01/28/2010: Attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous meetings may reduce depression symptoms

One of many reasons that attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings helps people with alcohol use disorders stay sober appears to be alleviation of depression. A team of researchers has found that study participants who attended AA meetings more frequently had fewer symptoms of depression – along with less drinking – than did those with less AA participation.

01/27/2010: Workers' Compensation Patients Get Less Benefit from Back Surgery

Surgery provides better results than nonsurgical treatment for most patients with back pain related to a herniated disk - but not for those receiving workers' compensation for work-related injuries, according to a study in the journal Spine.

01/27/2010: Biochemical profile may help diagnose, determine aggressiveness of prostate cancer

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy – which analyzes the biochemistry rather than the structure of tissues – may someday be able both to pinpoint the precise location of prostate cancer and to determine the tumor's aggressiveness, information that could help guide treatment planning.

01/21/2010: Lack of cellular enzyme triggers switch in glucose processing

A study investigating how a cellular enzyme affects blood glucose levels in mice provides clues to pathways that may be involved in processes including the regulation of longevity and the proliferation of tumor cells.

01/19/2010: Combination therapy may benefit patients with specific genetic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer

Even when their tumors are shrinking in response to therapy, some non-small cell lung cancer patients have a scattering of cancer cells that are undeterred by the drug, causing the tumor to resume its growth.

01/17/2010: New gene variants associated with glucose, insulin levels, some with diabetes risk

A major international study with leadership from MGH researchers has identified 10 new gene variants associated with blood sugar or insulin levels. Two of these novel variants and three that earlier studies associated with glucose levels were also found to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

01/13/2010: Words used to describe substance-use patients can alter attitudes, contribute to stigma

Changing the words used to describe someone struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction may significantly alter the attitudes of health care professionals, even those who specialize in addiction treatment.

01/07/2010: Study finds increased presence, severity of coronary artery plaques in HIV-infected men

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found that relatively young men with longstanding HIV infection and minimal cardiac risk factors had significantly more coronary atherosclerotic plaques - some involving serious arterial blockage - than did uninfected men with similar cardiovascular risk.

01/05/2010: ICER Report Suggests Similar Levels of Effectiveness among Management and Treatment Options for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

A comprehensive appraisal of the management and treatment options for low-risk prostate cancer found that the rates of survival and tumor recurrence are similar among the most common treatment approaches, although costs can vary considerably.

12/17/2009: Scientists discover natural flu-fighting protein in human cells

Researchers have identified a small family of flu-fighting proteins that somehow increases natural resistance to viral infection. The proteins block most virus particles from infecting the cell at the earliest stage in the virus lifecycle.

12/16/2009: New Web Tool May Help Predict Risk of Second Stroke

Scientists have developed a new web-based tool that may better predict whether a person will suffer a second stroke within 90 days of a first stroke.

12/15/2009: Smaller is Better for Finger Sensitivity

People who have smaller fingers have a finer sense of touch, according to new research in the Dec. 16 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This finding explains why women tend to have better tactile acuity than men, because women on average have smaller fingers.

12/14/2009: Study finds increased risk of death, stroke in postmenopausal women taking antidepressants

Women participating in the Women's Health Initiative study who reported taking an antidepressant drug had a small but statistically significant increase in the risk of stroke and of death compared with participants not taking antidepressants.

12/14/2009: Connecting the Dots

A team of researchers led by Daniel Haber, MD, PhD, director of the MGH Cancer Center, recently announced that they have revealed a unique molecular mechanism that might control the growth of cancer cells.

12/08/2009: Possible ovarian cancer treatment target identified

A multi-institutional study has identified a potential personalized treatment target for the most common form of ovarian cancer.

12/02/2009: Videos can help cancer patients choose level of care they prefer

Patients with terminal brain cancer who watched a brief video illustrating options for end-of-life care were significantly more likely to indicate a preference for comfort measures only than were patients who listened to a verbal description of treatment choices.

11/13/2009: Nicotine vaccine to be tested at Massachusetts General Hospital

People tackling the daunting task of trying to quit smoking could find help through a novel approach being tested at MGH.

11/09/2009: Discussing adverse events with patients improves how they rate their hospital care

A survey of patients had who experienced some sort of adverse event during their hospitalization found that, although caregivers discussed the event with patients less than half the time, those patients to whom the adverse event had been disclosed rated the quality of their care higher than did patients whose caregivers did not address the problem.

11/06/2009: Psychiatric impact of torture could be amplified by head injury

Depression and other emotional symptoms in survivors of torture and other traumatic experiences may be exacerbated by the effects of head injuries, according to a study from the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma, based at Massachusetts General Hospital.

11/03/2009: Industry support of academic life science research may be declining

While more than half the academic life science researchers responding to a 2007 survey indicated having some relationship with industrial entities, the prevalence of such relationships – particularly direct funding for research studies – appears to be dropping.

10/28/2009: A Decade Later, Lifestyle Changes or Metformin Still Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Intensive lifestyle changes aimed at modest weight loss reduced the rate of developing type 2 diabetes by 34 percent compared with placebo in people at high risk for the disease, researchers conclude based on 10 years of data.

10/21/2009: Sexual problems rarely addressed by internists caring for cancer survivors

More than half the internists responding to a survey indicated they rarely or never discussed sexual problems with their patients who had survived cancer.

10/19/2009: Clots traveling from lower veins may not be the cause of pulmonary embolism in trauma patients

A report from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital physicians calls into question the longstanding belief that pulmonary embolism – the life-threatening blockage of a major blood vessel in the lungs – is caused in trauma patients by a blood clot traveling from vessels deep within the legs or lower torso.

10/15/2009: From stem cells to functioning strip of heart muscle

A team of Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital and collaborators at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has taken a giant step toward the possibility of using human stem cells to repair damaged hearts.

10/12/2009: Study supports possible role of urate in slowing Parkinson’s disease progression

By examining data from a 20-year-old clinical trial, a research team based at the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Harvard School of Public Health, has found evidence supporting the findings of their 2008 study – that elevated levels of the antioxidant urate may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

10/08/2009: NHLBI supports consortium exploring stem-cell-based tools and treatments

Two teams led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, also members of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, are among 18 groups receiving National Heart Lung and Blood Institute grants for the development of stem-cell based tools and treatments to understand and treat cardiovascular and blood disorders. The Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium will consist of nine research hubs, each involving multidiscplinary teams from two academic medical centers.

10/07/2009: Genome-wide study of autism published in Nature

In one of the first studies of its kind, an international team of researchers has uncovered a single-letter change in the genetic code that is associated with autism.

09/21/2009: Vitamin D and Elderly Health

A new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Denver and Massachusetts General Hospital shows vitamin D plays a vital role in reducing the risk of death associated with older age.

09/15/2009: Comprehensive cardiac CT scan may give clearer picture of significant heart disease

A team of researchers led by Massachusetts General Hospital radiologists has developed a computed-tomography-based protocol that identifies both narrowing of coronary arteries and areas of myocardial ischemia - restricted blood flow to heart muscle tissue - giving a better indication of clinically significant coronary artery disease.

09/09/2009: MassGeneral Hospital for Children study explains some mysteries of neonatal seizures

A study led by MassGeneral Hospital for Children investigators is providing new insight into the mechanism of neonatal seizures, which have features very different from seizures in older children and adults.

09/04/2009: Cardiac biomarker levels strongly predict outcome of bypass surgery

Levels of a biomarker used in the diagnosis of heart attacks are almost universally elevated in patients who have undergone coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) and, when markedly elevated, powerfully predict the risk of complications.

09/03/2009: Large-scale study probes how cells fight pathogens

Scientists have deciphered a key molecular circuit that enables the body to distinguish viruses from bacteria and other microbes, providing a deep view of how immune cells in mammals fend off different pathogens. The research offers a practical approach for unraveling the circuits that underpin other important biological systems.

09/02/2009: A breath of fresh air could improve drug toxicity screening

A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers has developed an innovative way to culture liver cells for drug toxicity screening.

09/01/2009: New assessment quantifies risks and benefits of warfarin treatment for atrial fibrillation

Warfarin therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation - the most common type of significant heart rhythm disorder - appears to be most beneficial for the oldest patients, those who have had a prior stroke and for patients with multiple risk factors for stroke.

09/01/2009: New report describes types of research conducted at academic medical centers

A study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Health Policy gives the first detailed look at the types of research currently being conducted within U.S. academic medical centers - medical schools and their affiliated hospitals.

08/27/2009: Blood thinner causes stroke in some dialysis patients

The blood thinner warfarin can prevent strokes in most individuals with abnormal heart rhythms but may have the opposite effect in kidney disease patients on dialysis, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology.

08/24/2009: Twitter and health care - can a tweet a day keep the doctor away?

Twitter, the increasingly popular social networking tool that was at first merely a convenient way to stay in touch with friends and family, is emerging as a potentially valuable means of real-time, health care communication.

08/14/2009: NIH renews Harvard Center for AIDS Research grant for another five years

The National Institutes of Health has renewed for five years - and $18.1 million - the funding for the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (Harvard CFAR). Harvard is one of only 20 NIH CFAR sites in the U.S. and first received the designation in 2004.

08/11/2009: Denosumab increases bone density, cuts fracture risk in prostate cancer survivors

Twice-yearly treatment with denosumab, a new targeted therapy to stop bone loss, increased bone density and prevented spinal fractures in men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

08/11/2009: Postdiagnosis aspirin use reduces risk of dying from colorectal cancer

Regular use of aspirin after colorectal cancer diagnosis may reduce the risk of cancer death, report investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

07/30/2009: Unexpected reservoir of monocytes discovered in the spleen

Mass. General researchers discovered an unexpected reservoir of the immune cells called monocytes in the spleen and showed that these cells are essential to recovery of cardiac tissue in an animal heart attack model.

07/27/2009: Intensive Glucose Control Halves Complications of Longstanding Type 1 Diabetes

Near-normal control of glucose beginning as soon as possible after diagnosis would greatly improve the long-term prognosis of type 1 diabetes, concludes a study published in the July 27, 2009, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, which updates information about the clinical course of type 1 diabetes.

07/22/2009: Mass. General-based research center will investigate why immune system fails to control hepatitis C

A research consortium based at Massachusetts General Hospital has been awarded $15 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate how the hepatitis C virus resists suppression and clearance by the immune system.

07/22/2009: Recovery Act Funding Supports 23 Fellowships for Early Career Scientists

Mass. General investigator Joseph Tucker, MD, is among recipients of NIH Early Career Scientist fellowships.

07/20/2009: Study suggests earlier HIV antiviral treatment saves lives and is cost effective, even in areas of limited resources

Early initiation of lifesaving antiretroviral therapies should be the standard of care for all HIV-infected patients, even those in countries with limited medical and financial resources, according to a study led by researchers at MGH and the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, South Africa.

07/15/2009: MGH study identifies first molecular steps to childhood leukemia

A Massachusetts General Hospital-based research team has identified how a chromosomal abnormality known to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia – the most common cancer in children – initiates the disease process.

07/13/2009: Differences in immune response may explain why HIV-1 disease progresses faster in women than in men with same viral load

A research team based at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard has found a gender-based difference in the response of a first-line immune cell to HIV that may explain why the infection usually progresses faster in women than in men with the same viral loads.

07/08/2009: Antiangiogenesis treatment improves hearing in some NF2 patients

Treatment with the angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab improved hearing and alleviated other symptoms in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). The study by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) represents the first report of a successful NF2 treatment not involving surgery or radiation.

07/01/2009: Human cardiac master stem cells identified

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified the earliest master human heart stem cell from human embryonic stem cells - ISL1+ progenitors - that give rise to a family of cells that form the essential portions of the human heart.

07/01/2009: Large study strongly supports many common genetic contributions to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder

An international research consortium has discovered that many common genetic variants contribute to a person’s risk of schizophrenia and are also involved in bipolar disorder.

06/30/2009: Study provides greater understanding of Lyme disease-causing bacteria

A new study finds that a particular strain of the bacteria that causes Lyme disease may be more virulent, leading to increased inflammation in joints that persists after antibiotic treatment.

06/30/2009: Biomarkers’ ability to improve prediction of cardiovascular risk is modest

Measurement of known biomarkers of cardiovascular disease slightly improves the ability to predict future heart attack or stroke in healthy individuals, but not enough to change preventive therapies.

06/23/2009: Common ECG finding may indicate serious cardiac problems

A common electrocardiogram finding that has largely been considered insignificant may actually signal an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, the future need for a permanent pacemaker and an increased risk for premature death.

06/23/2009: Biomarkers Predict Brain Tumor’s Response to Therapy

A report in Cancer Research highlights a new biomarker that may be useful in identifying patients with recurrent glioblastoma who would respond better to antiangiogenesis therapy.

06/22/2009: Intensive in-hospital support doubles likelihood of smoking cessation in heart patients

Patients admitted to hospital with coronary artery disease are twice as likely to quit smoking after receiving intensive smoking cessation support compared to minimal support.

06/11/2009: Depression Medications May Reduce Male Fertility

As many as half of all men taking the antidepressant medication paroxetine (trade names Seroxat, Paxil) may have increased sperm DNA fragmentation — a predictor of compromised fertility. The study also found that the changes are reversible with normal levels of sperm returning after discontinuation of the drug.

06/10/2009: Brain-computer interface begins new clinical trial for paralysis

Scientists at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have initiated the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial to expand restorative neurotechnology research for some patients with paralysis.

06/07/2009: Recruitment of reproductive features into other cell types may underlie extended lifespan in animals

MGH researchers have found that certain genetic mutations known to extend the lifespan of the C. elegans roundworm induce 'mortal' somatic cells to express some of the genes that allow the 'immortality' of reproductive germline cells.

06/01/2009: Hitting where it hurts

A new study uncovers a gene expression signature that reliably identifies cancer cells whose survival is dependent on a common signaling pathway, even when the cells contain multiple other genetic abnormalities. The study from MGH Cancer Center researchers identifies critical molecular vulnerabilities, thereby revealing promising therapeutic targets for a common and notoriously treatment resistant cancer.

05/28/2009: Video can help patients make end-of-life decision

Viewing a video showing a patient with advanced dementia interacting with family and caregivers may help elderly patients plan for end-of-life care, according to a study led by MGH researchers.

05/26/2009: Mass. General’s Rudy Tanzi a “Rock Star of Science”

Alzheimer’s disease researcher Rudolph Tanzi, PhD, of Massachusetts General Hospital adds another distinction to his scientific career when he joins Aerosmith’s Joe Perry and other rock celebrities in a designer menswear photo shoot as a “Rock Star of Science” in the June issue of GQ Magazine.

05/21/2009: Automated analysis of MR images may identify early Alzheimer’s disease

Analyzing MRI studies of the brain with software developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Mass. General Hospital may allow diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and of mild cognitive impairment, a lesser form of dementia that precedes the development of Alzheimer's by several years.

05/21/2009: Genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk may be greatly underutilized

Although a test for gene mutations known to significantly increase the risk of hereditary breast or ovarian cancer has been available for more than a decade, a new study finds that few women with family histories of these cancers are even discussing genetic testing with their physicians or other health care providers.

05/19/2009: Study suggests TB screening needs to be targeted for maximum public health benefit

New estimates of the likelihood that a latent case of tuberculosis will become active have resulted in a roughly 50 percent increase over previous estimates of the number of people needed to be screened to prevent an active infection.

05/18/2009: Study examines trends in gallbladder cancer over 4 decades

Overall prognosis for gallbladder cancer appears to be improving, although many patients still have incurable disease and poor survival rates.

05/15/2009: Study finds virtual doctors visits satisfactory for both patients and clinicians

Someday, even doctor visits could be among the conveniences offered via the Internet. In a comparison of desktop videoconferencing to conventional face-to-face general medical evaluations, patients found virtual visits similar to face-to-face visits on most measures. This study suggests that both patients and physicians could benefit if virtual visits were used as an alternative method of accessing primary care services.

05/12/2009: Enriched environment improves wound healing in rats

Improving the environment in which rats are reared can significantly strengthen the physiological process of wound healing, according to a report in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. MGH researchers found that giving rats living in isolation the opportunity to build nests led to faster and more complete healing of burn injuries.

05/10/2009: International study identifies potential treatment targets for hypertension

Scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), as part of a major international research collaboration, have associated common variants in eight regions of DNA with blood pressure levels in human patients. Six of the identified regions have not previously been implicated in blood pressure regulation.

05/08/2009: Videoconferencing can increase patient access to stroke specialists

High-quality videoconferencing can increase patient access to stroke specialists; and a transient ischemic attack, once known as a “mini” or “warning” stroke, should be treated with the same urgency as a full-blown stroke, according to two separate statements published today in Stroke.

04/29/2009: Researchers Develop New Technique For Modifying Plant Genes

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Massachusetts General Hospital have used a genome engineering tool they developed to make a model crop plant herbicide-resistant without significant changes to its DNA.

04/23/2009: Non-invasive test accurately identifies gynecologic malignancies

Diffusion weighted MR can accurately identify benign from malignant pelvic lymph nodes in patients with gynecologic malignancy, according to an MGH study.

04/06/2009: Simple bedside test improves diagnosis of chronic back pain, could guide treatment

A simple and inexpensive method of assessing pain, developed by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers, is better than currently used techniques for distinguishing neuropathic pain – pain caused by damage to the nervous system – from other types of chronic back pain.

04/03/2009: Model tissue system reveals cellular communication via amino acids

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine has found the first evidence of cell-to-cell communication by amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, rather than by known protein signaling agents such as growth factors or cytokines.

04/02/2009: Modification of mutant huntingtin protein increases its clearance from brain cells

A new study has identified a potential strategy for removing the abnormal protein that causes Huntington’s disease from brain cells, which could slow the progression of the devastating neurological disorder.

03/30/2009: Intestinal parasites alter immunity in cholera patients

Results of the study from a collaborative team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh suggest that parasitic infection could reduce the immune response to cholera, which may compromise the effectiveness of cholera vaccines.

03/30/2009: Angiogenesis inhibitor improves brain tumor survival by reducing edema

The beneficial effects of anti-angiogenesis drugs in the treatment of the deadly brain tumors called glioblastomas appear to result primarily from reduction of edema – the swelling of brain tissue – and not from any direct anti-tumor effect.

03/26/2009: HHMI Gives 50 Early Career Scientists a Jump on Their Next Big Idea

Two MGH investigators – Bradley E. Bernstein, MD, PhD, and Konrad Hochedlinger, PhD – are among 50 receipients of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist Awards.

03/25/2009: Policies regarding IRB members’ industry relationships often lacking

At a time of heightened concern about conflicts of interest posed by relationships between academic medical researchers and commercial firms, a new study finds that a significant number of academic institutions do not have clear policies covering the industrial relationships of members of Institutional Review Boards, committees charged with ensuring that clinical studies uphold patient rights and follow ethical guidelines.

03/25/2009: Intensive summer program helps physicians build clinical research careers

Graduates of the Program in Clinical Effectiveness, which has trained almost 1,900 physicians to be clinical investigators since 1986, have achieved significant success in receiving grant support from the National Institutes of Health and other funders, along with other accomplishments considered key to establishing a research career.

03/23/2009: Common gene variants influence risk factor for sudden cardiac death

A new study has identified several common genetic variants related to a risk factor for sudden cardiac death. The report receiving early online release in the journal Nature Genetics identifies variants in genes, some known and some newly discovered, that influence the QT interval measured on the electrocardiogram (EKG) performed routinely in doctors’ offices.

03/19/2009: New Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV Research Created in South Africa

A groundbreaking partnership between the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa will establish an international research center focused on the worldwide effort to control the devastating co-epidemic of tuberculosis and HIV.

03/18/2009: Study identifies human genes required for hepatitis C viral replication

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers are investigating a new way to block reproduction of the hepatitis C virus – targeting not the virus itself but the human genes the virus exploits in its life cycle.

03/06/2009: Both Latino and non-Latino women likely to accept HPV vaccination for selves and children

Most women responding to a survey conducted at MGH clinics indicated they would be willing to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus and to have their daughters and even sons vaccinated in order to prevent cancer in their children. The report also found that Latino women are just as likely, if not more so, to accept HPV vaccine as non-Latinos.

03/02/2009: Patient-Physician "Connectedness" Affects Quality of Care

A new study finds that patients who are connected to a specific primary care physician are more likely to receive guideline-consistent care than those who are connected to a practice but not a physician.

02/26/2009: International collaboration identifies new gene associated with ALS

A collaborative research effort spanning nearly a decade between researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and King’s College London has identified a novel gene for inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease).

02/26/2009: Alzheimer’s-associated plaques may have impact throughout the brain

The impact of the amyloid plaques that appear in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease may extend beyond the deposits’ effects on neurons– the cells that transmit electrochemical signals throughout the nervous system.

02/25/2009: HIV is evolving to evade human immune responses

HIV is evolving rapidly to escape the human immune system, an international study has shown. The findings demonstrate the challenge of developing an HIV vaccine that keeps pace with the changing nature of the virus.

02/23/2009: Vitamin D deficiency may increase risk of colds, flu

Vitamin D may be an important way to arm the immune system against disorders like the common cold, report investigators from the University of Colorado Denver (UC Denver) School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Children’s Hospital Boston.

02/15/2009: Common gene variants increase risk of hypertension, finding may lead to new therapies

A new study has identified the first common gene variants associated with an increased incidence of hypertension – a significant risk factor for heart attack, stroke and kidney failure.

02/09/2009: Stroke Therapy Window Might Be Extended Past Nine Hours for Some

Some patients who suffer a stroke as a result of a blockage in an artery in the brain may benefit from a clot-busting drug nine or more hours after the onset of symptoms.

02/08/2009: International study identifies gene variants associated with early heart attack

The largest study ever completed of genetic factors associated with heart attacks has identified nine genetic regions - three not previously described - that appear to increase the risk for early-onset myocardial infarction.

01/19/2009: Virtual communities may provide valuable support for psoriasis patients

Online support communities appear to offer both a valuable educational resource and a source of psychological and social support for individuals with psoriasis, according to a report from the Center for Connected Health at Partners HealthCare System.

01/14/2009: Hospital pilot sites demonstrate surgical safety checklist drops deaths and complications by more than one third

A group of hospitals in eight cities around the globe has successfully demonstrated that the use of a simple surgical checklist during major operations can lower the incidence of deaths and complications by more than one third.

01/14/2009: New model system may better explain regulation of body weight

A new mathematical model of the physiological regulation of body weight suggests a potential mechanism underlying the difficulty of losing weight, one that includes aspects of two competing hypotheses of weight regulation.

01/05/2009: Nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord sense pain caused by physical insult

Mass. General researchers and the colleagues add to understanding of the role of the protein COX2 in pain associated with inflammation.

12/17/2008: Researchers compile ‘molecular manual’ for hundreds of inherited diseases

An international research team has compiled the first catalogue of tissue-specific pathologies underlying hundreds of inherited diseases.

12/17/2008: Supply of board-certified emergency physicians unlikely to meet projected needs

The number of physicians with board certification in emergency medicine is unlikely to meet the staffing needs of U.S. emergency departments in the foreseeable future, if ever; according to a study from a research team based at Massachusetts General Hospital

12/10/2008: Hormone therapy for prostate cancer does not appear to increase cardiac deaths

Treating prostate cancer patients with drugs that block hormonal activity does not appear to increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a study led by MGH researchers

12/09/2008: Research team explores causes of death on Mount Everest

In the first detailed analysis of deaths during expeditions to the summit of Mt. Everest, a research team led by MGH investigators has conducted found that most deaths occur during descents from the summit in the so-called “death zone” above 8,000 meters and identified factors associated with a greater risk of death.

12/05/2008: Some blood-system stem cells reproduce more slowly than expected

MGH investigators have found a subpopulation of hematopoietic stem cells, the source of all blood and immune system cells, that reproduce much more slowly than previously anticipated. Use of these slow-cycling cells may improve the outcome of stem-cell transplants for the treatment of leukemia and other bone-marrow-based diseases.

12/03/2008: Robotic Technology Improves Stroke Rehabilitation

MGH scientists have used a novel, hand-operated robotic device and functional MRI to track the rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients, showing that the brain can continue to regain function even six months or more after a stroke.

11/30/2008: Combining targeted therapy drugs may treat previously resistant tumors

A team of cancer researchers from several Boston academic medical centers has discovered a potential treatment for tumors driven by mutations in the K-Ras gene, which have resisted previous targeted therapy approaches.

11/30/2008: Discoveries May Help Scientists Understand Why Disease Turns Soft Tissue Into Bone

Scientists have created a new mouse model that may help researchers explain how a rare disease causes otherwise supple soft tissue and joints to turn into bone.

11/24/2008: Sealing off portion of intestinal lining treats obesity, resolves diabetes in animal model

Lining the upper portion of the small intestine with an impermeable sleeve led to both weight loss and restoration of normal glucose metabolism in an animal model of obesity-induced diabetes.

11/19/2008: Genetic screening no better than traditional risk factors for predicting type 2 diabetes

Screening for a panel of gene variants associated with the risk for type 2 diabetes can identify adults at risk for the disorder but is not significantly better than assessment based on traditional risk factors.

11/17/2008: Great story here

brief description of what the story is

11/17/2008: Technology gives three-dimensional view of human coronary arteries

For the first time researchers are getting a detailed look at the interior of human coronary arteries, using an optical imaging technique developed at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.

11/16/2008: Tiny sacs released by brain tumor cells carry information that may guide treatment

MGH researchers have found that tiny membrane-covered sacs released from glioblastoma cells contain molecules that may help guide treatment of the deadly brain tumor.

11/12/2008: Common anesthetic induces Alzheimer’s-associated changes in mouse brains

For the first time researchers have shown that a commonly used anesthetic can produce changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of living mammals, confirming previous laboratory studies.

11/07/2008: Interaction between gene variants may alter brain function in schizophrenia

A collaborative study led by investigators from MGH is giving what may be the first look at how interactions between genes underlie a key symptom of schizophrenia, impaired working memory.

10/31/2008: While prevalent, sexual problems in women not always associated with distress

The largest such study ever published finds that, while about 40 percent of women surveyed report having sexual problems, only 12 percent indicate that those issues are a source of significant personal distress

10/30/2008: Gene scan of Alzheimer’s families identifies four new suspect genes

The first family-based genome-wide association study in Alzheimer’s disease has identified the sites of four novel genes that may significantly influence risk for the most common late-onset form of the devastating neurological disorder.

10/27/2008: Meta-analysis examines cardiovascular effects of diabetes medications

The diabetes medication metformin may be associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis of previously published studies in the October 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

10/21/2008: ADHD appears to increase level of nicotine dependence in smokers

Young people with ADHD are not only at increased risk of starting to smoke cigarettes, they also tend to become more seriously addicted to tobacco and more vulnerable to environmental factors such as having friends or parents who smoke.

10/16/2008: Gene therapy restores vision to mice with retinal degeneration

MGH researchers have used gene therapy to restore useful vision to mice with degeneration of the light-sensing retinal rods and cones, a common cause of human blindness.

10/13/2008: Intensive support programs can help hospitalized smokers stay smoke-free

Hospital-sponsored stop-smoking programs for inpatients that include follow-up counseling for longer than one month significantly improve patients’ ability to stay smoke-free.

10/08/2008: Study finds abnormalities in cerebral cortex of cocaine addicts

A brain imaging study carried out at MGH reveals abnormalities in the cerebral cortex – the outer surface of the brain – of cocaine addicts that appear to correlate with dysfunction in areas responsible for attention and for reward-based decision-making.

10/01/2008: Thompson Reuters Predicts the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Since 1989, Thomson Reuters has developed a list of likely winners in medicine, chemistry, physics, and economics. Those chosen are named Thomson Reuters Scientific Laureates.

09/30/2008: Extra copies of EGFR gene signal poor prognosis for vulvar cancer

MGH researchers report that women with vulvar carcinoma whose tumors have extra copies of the EGFR gene are at increased risk of dying from their cancer, information that could indentify patients who should be treated with targeted therapy drugs.

09/25/2008: New approach to gene therapy may shrink brain tumors, prevent their spread

MGH researchers are investigating a new approach to gene therapy for brain tumors – delivering a cancer-fighting gene to normal brain tissue around the tumor to keep it from spreading.

09/22/2008: NIH extends commitment to transformative research with 2008 Pioneer, New Innovator Awards

The National Institutes of Health announced today that it has increased its support of high-impact research with 2008 NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards to 47 scientists, many of whom are in the early stages of their careers.

09/22/2008: Study confirms benefit of combination therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

Treatment with Alzheimer’s disease drugs can significantly slow the rate at which the disorder advances, and therapy with two different classes of drugs is even better at helping patients maintain their ability to perform daily activities.

09/09/2008: Advanced blood analysis may speed diagnosis of heart attacks

Someday doctors may be able to use a blood test to confirm within minutes, instead of hours, if a patient is having a heart attack, allowing more rapid treatment that could limit damage to heart muscle.

08/28/2008: Risk of fracture is significantly higher in HIV-infected patients

As antiviral treatment for HIV infection allows patients to live longer, many will be confronted with additional health challenges. A new study shows for the first time that one of these may be significantly increased risk of bone fractures.

08/25/2008: Potential diabetes treatment selectively kills autoimmune cells from human patients

In experiments using blood cells from human patients with diabetes and other autoimmune disorders, MGH researchers have confirmed the mechanism behind a potential new therapy for type 1 diabetes

08/20/2008: Bone marrow stem cells may help control inflammatory bowel disease

MGH investigators have found that infusions of a particular bone marrow stem cell appeared to protect gastrointestinal tissue from autoimmune attack in a mouse model.

08/19/2008: Obese prostate cancer patients may benefit more from brachytherapy

Brachytherapy, also called seed implants, may be a more beneficial treatment than surgery or external beam radiation therapy for overweight or obese prostate cancer patients.

08/19/2008: Prostate Cancer Foundation Commits $4.3 Million to Young Investigators

The Prostate Cancer Foundation today announced 19 Young Investigators Awards for 2008.

08/18/2008: Largest Study of Its Kind Implicates Gene Abnormalities in Bipolar Disorder

The largest genetic analysis of its kind to date for bipolar disorder has implicated machinery involved in the balance of sodium and calcium in brain cells.

08/07/2008: Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers create 20 disease-specific stem cell lines

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researcher George Q. Daley, has with HSCI colleagues Chad Cowan and Konrad Hochedlinger of Massachusetts General Hospital produced a robust new collection of disease-specific stem cell lines, all of which were developed using the new induced pluripotent stem cell technique.

08/06/2008: Study finds connections between genetics, brain activity and preference

A team of MGH researchers has used brain imaging, genetics and experimental psychology techniques to identify a connection between brain reward circuitry, a behavioral measurement of preference and a gene variant that appears to influence both.

08/06/2008: Hormone level may reflect mortality risk among dialysis patients

A new study suggests that monitoring levels of a hormone called fibroblast growth factor 23 may provide information crucial to the treatment of patients with kidney failure.

07/30/2008: MGH study shows how amyloid plaques may damage brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Using an advanced imaging technique that reveals how brain cells are functioning, researchers from the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease have found that levels of intracellular calcium are significantly elevated in neurons close to plaques in the brains of an Alzheimer’s mouse model.

07/30/2008: Large study uncovers surprisingly diverse genome alterations that contribute to schizophrenia

A multinational group of investigators has discovered that people suffering from schizophrenia are far more likely to carry rare chromosomal structural changes of all types, particularly those that have the potential to alter gene function.

07/24/2008: Consortium develops new method enabling routine targeted gene modification

A multi-institutional team led by MGH investigators has developed a powerful new tool for genomic research and medicine – a robust method for generating synthetic enzymes that can target particular DNA sequences for inactivation or repair.

07/21/2008: Viral recombination another way HIV fools the immune system

When individuals infected with HIV become infected with a second strain of the virus, the two viral strains can exchange genetic information, creating a third, recombinant strain of the virus. Now a study from the Partners AIDS Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital shows that how and where viral strains swap DNA may be determined by the immune response against the original infecting strain.

07/10/2008: Middle Eastern families yield intriguing clues to autism

Research has implicated a half-dozen new genes in autism and strongly supports the idea that autism stems from disruptions in the brain's ability to form new connections in response to experience.

07/02/2008: Circulating tumor cells can reveal genetic signature of dangerous lung cancers

An MGH-developed, microchip-based device that detects and analyzes tumor cells in the bloodstream can be used to determine the genetic signature of lung tumors, facilitating targeted therapies and monitoring genetic changes that occur during therapy.

07/01/2008: CIMIT Names Recipients of Young Clinician Research Awards

CIMIT is pleased to announce that six bright and promising medical professionals have been named recipients of the Young Clinician Award for 2008.

06/29/2008: International team identifies 21 new genetic risk factors for Crohn’s disease

An international consortium of Crohn’s disease researchers has combined data from three independent studies to identify 21 new genetic variants associated with the inflammatory bowel disorder, bringing the total number of risk factors to 32.

06/04/2008: Simple membranes could have allowed nutrients to pass into primitive cells

An MGH research team has found that the sort of very simple membrane that may have been present on primitive cells can easily allow small molecules – including the building blocks of RNA and DNA – to pass thorough.

06/02/2008: NARSAD Researchers Identify Specific Genes and Family Traits Linked to Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder and Depression

New findings from research conducted by Harvard-affiliated scientists are providing important clues into how genes work to impair various aspects of attention, memory and perception -- the behaviors associated with many psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.

06/02/2008: Report confirms increased risk of smoking, substance abuse in bipolar adolescents

An MGH study - the largest and first controlled such investigation - supports previous reports that adolescents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for smoking and substance abuse.

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