We have a long history or surveying patients before and after their joint replacements as part of a patient registry. The results of these surveys allow our doctors and researches to continue making improvements to implant design, surgical techniques and ultimately enhance the performance of your joint replacement.

Mass General Total Knee Replacements: Quality & Safety Data

Below are two types of quality and safety information that are routinely monitored through the Registry including a measurement of overall health improvement after joint replacement surgery and the rate of joint replacement revisions for original surgeries performed at MGH.

Overall Health Improves after Total Knee Replacement

Overall Health Improves after Total Knee Replacement

The EQ-5D is a standardized measure of overall health. It is applicable to a wide range of health conditions and treatments, and provides an overall assessment of health. The Weighted Health State Index is calculated from the patients’ assessment of their mobility, self-care, usual activities, discomfort and anxiety.

Our data confirm what our patients with end-stage arthritis already know - that their painful knee joint severely affects their quality of life and is reflected in the very low “Before Surgery” score. But after a total knee replacement (5 Years After Surgery), the pain in the joint goes away and our patients can perform most activities expected of their age group. Thus their scores rise dramatically to match scores of healthy age-matched population (Normal).

High Quality of Total Knee Replacement at MGH Orthopaedics

High Quality of Total Knee Replacement at MGH Orthopaedics

A revision of a total knee replacement is performed to exchange one or more of the components of the knee prosthesis. Since a revision surgery represents an undesirable outcome, the revision rate is an important measure of the quality of a primary knee replacement. A lower revision “burden” represents higher quality.

In 2011 at MGH Orthopaedics, we revised 2.96% of our primary total knee replacements. The estimated US national revision burden is 8.2% for total knee replacements (1).

The revision burden is influenced by various factors such as the type of implant used and surgical technique. A shortcoming of this data is that if any patient had their revision surgery performed at a different institution that would not be included in the revision burden at the hospital where the primary surgery took place.

1. Kurtz S, et al. Prevalence of primary and revision total hip and knee arthroplasty in the United States from 1990 through 2002. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2005;87(7):1487-1497.