Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency

Year 1 Goals -- Child Psychiatry Residency

goals training

 

 

 

General Goals and Objectives For Year 1In Year 1, the resident must demonstrate the following knowledge, skills and attitudes in addition to the six core competencies outlined in the following section including: patient care,medical knowledge, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, professionalism and systems-based practice.

Knowledge
In Year 1, the resident must demonstrate increasing knowledge in the following areas:

-- Normal and abnormal development in infancy through adulthood

-- Basic knowledge of clinical pediatric neurology, including neuroscience as they pertain to psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents.

-- The full spectrum of psychopathology in children, adolescents and families, including all DSM IV TR conditions

-- Methods of performing complete outpatient assessments of children, adolescents and families, including the use of a range of interview techniques and the range of ancillary laboratory, medical and psychological tests used in data gathering

-- The indications, contraindications and possible adverse effects of the full spectrum of treatment modalities that may be used for children, adolescents and families, including both long-term and brief individual therapy, supportive therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, crisis intervention, family therapy, group therapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, phramacotherapy and combined psychotherapy and psychopharmacology

-- The role and functions of consultation to pediatrics, schools and courts

-- The basic information presented in the Year 1 clinical and didactic curriculum of the training program, augmented by self-directed learning in biological, social and clinical sciences related to child and adolescent psychiatry. The goals and objectives of all clinical and didactic seminars are distributed in the Orientation Manual and at the beginning of every rotation and seminar

-- Principles of cultural differences in patients

-- Principles of medical ethics in care of children, adolescents and families in multiple settings

-- The system of health care as it pertains to children, adolescents and families, including the role and function of community and state agencies

-- The impact of fatigue and sleep deprivation on clinical performance

-- Basic principles of patients and staff safety

-- Basic principles of transitions of care and hand-offs on all clinical services

-- Self-awareness of the need for transportation home due to fatigue

-- Increasing self-reflection on one’s knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to assume greater responsibility during the residency -- with patients, peers, and staff.

-- Basic and increasing use of the electronic medical record for documentation of clinical work, and as a means of increasing knowledge, skills and attitudes about HIPPA and other national regulatory policies regarding documentation of treatment, patient education about treatment efficacy, and demonstration (by means of a chart stimulated review) of proper documentation and case formulation.

-- Principles of quality improvement in a system of care.

Skills
In Year 1, the resident must demonstrate increasing skill in each of the following areas:

-- Assessment of children, adolescents and families in a range of settings, including the outpatient clinic, emergency room, inpatient and partial hospital units

goals

-- Ability to perform a competent pediatric neurologic examination and provide a basic pediatric neurologic differential diagnosis

-- Ability to develop a comprehensive differential diagnosis and multimodal treatment plan for children, adolescents and families, including use of appropriate laboratory, medical and psychological examinations

-- Ability to assess, discuss, document and intervene comprehensively concerning the patient’s potential for self-harm or harm to others

-- Ability to conduct therapeutic interviews with children, adolescents and families

-- Ability to conduct a range of therapies, including individual brief and long-term psychotherapy, supportive therapy, family therapy, group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, combined psychotherapy and psychopharmacology

-- Ability to provide consultation effectively to pediatrics, schools and courts

 

-- Ability to apply principles of cultural difference in patients

-- Ability to apply principles of medical ethics in care of children, adolescents and families in multiple settings

-- Ability to evaluate and conduct emergency interventions in a range of settings, including outpatient clinics, pediatric wards, the emergency room, inpatient and partial hospital settings

-- Ability to conduct assessments and treatments within a continuum of care

-- Ability to conduct assessments and treatments with diverse populations of children, adolescents and families, with attention to differences in age, gender, race, culture and socioeconomic status

-- Ability to apply basic principles of patients and staff safety

-- Ability to apply basic principles of transitions of care and hand-offs on all clinical services

-- Ability to apply self-awareness of the need for transportation home due to fatigue

-- Demonstration of increasing self-reflection on one’s knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to assume greater responsibility during the residency -- with patients, peers, and staff.

-- Ability to apply basic and increasing use of the electronic medical record for documentation of clinical work, and as a means of increasing knowledge, skills and attitudes about HIPPA and other national regulatory policies regarding documentation of treatment, patient education about treatment efficacy, and demonstration (by means of a chart stimulated review) of proper documentation and case formulation.

-- Ability to perform a systems-wide quality improvement project with peers, faculty and staff.

Attitudes
In Year 1, the resident must demonstrate the attitudes indicated in the six core competencies.