Clinical Research

The purpose of this study is to test whether adding the medication riluzole to Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) antidepressants for the treatment of depression enhances the efficacy of the SSRIs.

A Study of Riluzole When Taken with Sertraline for Major Depressive Disorder

Are you sad, blue or down in the dumps?

Have you lost interest in things you used to enjoy?

Have you tried antidepressants that have not worked?

Are you currently taking an antidepressant?

Do you still feel depressed?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be suffering with depression, and may be eligible to participate in a no cost research study at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Depression Clinical and Research Program.

This research study explores whether adding riluzole (Rilutek ™) to Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) antidepressants (such as Lexapro, Celexa, Prozac, Paxil, or Zoloft) for the treatment of depression enhances the efficacy of the SSRIs. Participants not already on an antidepressant or not taking one of the approved SSRI antidepressant medications for this study have the opportunity to receive Sertraline (Zoloft) for their depression throughout this study.

Because we are trying to learn if riluzole is an effective medication for treating depression, it is being compared to a placebo (inactive substance). It is possible in this study that you could take an inactive substance in addition to an antidepressant. Participants will have a greater than 50% chance of receiving active medication at some point over the course of the study.

This study involves visits weekly to our MGH clinic in downtown Boston. You will be compensated $25 per visit to our clinic.

For more information on this and other depression studies, please reply to this advertisement or call Brianna at 617-724-9458.

 

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Research at Mass General

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