Eric S. Rosenberg, MD

Rosenberg Lab

“To characterize the mechanisms of CD4 cell dysfunction in persons with acute HIV infection...”

Overview

Affiliations

Eric S . Rosenberg, MD

Associate Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School
Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital
Director, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory
Infectious Disease Division and Clinical Microbiology Laboratories

Massachusetts General Hospital
Gray J-529
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
Phone: 617-724-7519
Email: erosenberg1@partners.org

Overview

In the vast majority of individuals infected with HIV-1, infection is characterized by the inability of the immune system to control viral replication. This failure of containment of HIV-1 replication inevitably results in disease progression. The one notable exception to this observation is in persons with long-term non-progressive infection who appear to contain viral replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. My laboratory investigates the mechanisms used by the cellular immune system in these individuals who are successful in mounting effective responses against HIV-1. Recent work has focused on characterizing CD4+ T helper cell function in individuals with long-term non-progressive infection and in a cohort of persons identified with acute HIV-1 infection prior to antibody seroconversion who when treated also generate functionally relevant immune responses. Currently, we are studying immunologic and virologic mechanisms employed by both host and virus that result in success or failure of the host immune response. In particular, we are studying how HIV-specific CD4+T helper cell responses are generated and subsequently disarmed during acute HIV-1 infection. In addition, we are studying the immunologic, virologic and clinical impact of antiretroviral therapy initiated during acute HIV-1 infection. Further investigation into the function of CD4+ T helper cells in these individuals will hopefully provide critical insight into the pathogenesis of HIV and support rationale for further immunotherapeutic interventions and vaccine development.

Group Members

Eric S. Rosenberg, MD

Selected Publications

Bibliography of Eric S. Rosenberg via PubMed

Lemieux JE, Tran A, Freimark L, Schaffner SF, Goethert H, Anderson KG, Bazner S, Li A, McGrath G, Sloan L, Vannier E, Milner D, Pritt B, Rosenberg ES*, Telefored S*, Bailey JA*, Sabeti PC*.  A global map of genetic diversity in Babesia microti reveals strong population structure and identifies variants associated with clinical relapse.  Nature Microbiology (in press).
Lo J*, Rosenberg ES*, Fitzgerald ML, Bazner S, Ihenachor EJ, Keenan A, Hawxhurst V, Wei J, Zimmerman C, Burdo TH, Williams K, Freeman MW, Grinspoon SK. HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity is improved by treatment with antiretroviral therapy in acute HIV Infection. Open Forum Infectious Diseases.  2014; 1(3).

CLSI. Criteria for Laboratory Testing and Diagnosis of HIV Infection; Approved Guideline. CLSI document M53-A. Wayne, PA: Chair holder: Rosenberg, ES. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; 2011.

Rychert J, Strickt D, Robinson J, Rosenberg ES. Detection of HIV gp120 in Plasma during Early HIV Infection is Associated with Increased Proinfl ammatory and Immunoregulatory Cytokines. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses; 2010.

Rosenberg ES, Graham BS, Chan ES, Bosch RJ, Stocker V, Maenza J, Markowitz M, Little S, Sax PE, Collier AC, Nabel G, Saindon S, Flynn T, Kuritzkes D, Barouch DH for the ACTG A5187 Team. Safety and immunogenicity of therapeutic DNA vaccination in individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection. PLoS ONE.  2010; 5(5):e10555.

Rychert J, Saindon S, Placek S, Daskalakis D, Rosenberg ES. Sequence variation occurs in CD4 epitopes during early HIV infection. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2007; 46(3):261-7.

Kassutto S, Johnston MN, Rosenberg ES. Incomplete HIV-1 antibody evolution and sero-reversion in acutely infected individuals treated with early antiretroviral therapy. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2005; 40(6):868-73.

Kaufmann DE, Bailey PM, Sidney J, Wagner B, Norris PJ, Johnston MN, Cosimi LA, Addo MM, Lichterfeld M, Altfeld M, Frahm N, Brander C, Sette A, Walker BD, Rosenberg ES. Comprehensive analysis of HIV-1-specific CD4 responses reveals marked immunodominance of gag and nef and the presence of broadly recognized peptides. Journal of Virology. 2004; 78:4463-4477.

Contact

Contact Us

Rosenberg Laboratory

Massachusetts General Hospital

55 Fruit Street Boston, MA 02114
  • Phone: 617-724-7519

Email: erosenberg1@partners.org

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