Center for Quantitative Health

Center for Quantitative Health

The MGH Psychiatry Center for Quantitative Health (CQH) focuses on utilizing large data sets to develop strategies for probabilistic medicine and quantitative health
Contact the Center by email

Contact us by phone 617-643-6310

Overview

The Center for Quantitative Health (CQH) in the Division of Clinical Research at Massachusetts General Hospital focuses on utilizing large data sets to develop strategies for probabilistic medicine and quantitative health.


We have four main areas of focus:

  1. Developing ways to better match patients with effective treatment
  2. Developing tools to allow clinicians to quantify short- and long-term risks for individual patients
  3. Identifying promising treatments already approved by the FDA that can be repurposed for other applications
  4. Monitoring treatment outcomes

Active Projects seeking Participants

 We are currently recruiting patients with bipolar disorder or major depression to participate in a study of a mobile health application. Please call 617-643-6310 or email CEDD@partners.org to see if you might be eligible to participate in a study.


Our Philosophy

We believe that despite the incredible hype associated with big data, there is an opportunity to better serve our patients by developing tools for making clinically actionable predictions.

By facilitating the interaction of clinical and basic scientists at MGH and the broader community, and providing tools to do challenging but essential studies, CQH is intended to bridge the gap between large datasets and clinical application. It works closely with the MGH clinical and research programs, with the Clinical Trials Network and Institute (CTNI), and with translational programs such as the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit (PNGU) and the Center for Genomic Medicine.

 

Group Members

Roy Perlis, MD, MSc

 

Roy Perlis, MD, MSc

Director, Center for Quantitative Health
Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Perlis is the director of the Center for Quantitative Health in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, the Associate Director of the Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, and Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

He also serves as consultant to the American Psychiatric Association's bipolar treatment guidelines workgroup.

A graduate of Brown University, Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, he completed his residency, chief residency, and clinical/research fellowship at Mass General before joining the faculty.

Dr. Perlis' clinical work and research is focused on difficult-to-treat or treatment resistant mood disorders, including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. He has authored more than 125 articles reporting original research, as well as numerous book chapters and reviews.

Current research efforts include identifying genetic variations which might predict treatment response, creating neuronal models of disease, and identifying and studying novel treatments for mood disorders.

His research has been supported by awards from NARSAD, NIMH, NSF, the American Philosophical Society, the Bowman Family Foundation, and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, among others. In 2010 Dr. Perlis was awarded the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance's Klerman Young Investigator Award. 

 

 Tom McCoy, MD

Director of Research, Center for Quantitative Health

Dr. McCoy attended Dartmouth College and Cornell Medical School before completing the MGH / McLean Psychiatry residency and an informatics fellowship in the Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics. Dr. McCoy served as MGH Consult Psychiatry Chief Resident. He is currently Director of Research for the Center for Quantitative Health.

 

Leslie Snapper


Leslie Snapper 

Clinical Research Coordinator, Center for Quantitative Health

Education: BS in psychology, Boston College
Interests: Mental illness, neuroscience, art
Hometown: Ashland, MA

Past training: Research assistant in the Arts and Mind Lab at Boston College (researching our perception of art based on information about the artist using survey and eye tracking methods), administrative assistant at Boston College Chemistry Department.

Hobbies: Weightlifting, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, martial arts, hiking, rock climbing, painting and drawing, reading and traveling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Kamber L. Hart 

Clinical Research Coordinator, Center for Quantitative Health

Kamber graduated from Princeton University in 2016 with a AB in psychology. Her thesis focused on linguistic patterns of depression, specifically the use of metaphors in literature and personal accounts to describe the depressed state. Her goals are to apply to medical school and continue studying the intersection of language and mental health.  


Affiliated Faculty

Cristina Cusin, MD
Staff Psychiatrist, Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School


Maurizio Fava, MD
Executive Vice Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital
Director, Division of Clinical Research, Mass General Research Institute
Executive Director, Clinical Trials Network and Institute (CTNI)
Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research, Slater Family Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School


Steve Haggarty, PhD
Associate Investigator, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
Associate Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School


Tracey Petryshen, PhD
Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
Associate Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School
Associate Member, Broad Institute
Director, Harvard Catalyst ‘Omics Education Program


Joshua L. Roffman, MD, MMSc
Co-Director for Psychiatric Neuroimaging, Massachusetts General Hospital
Director of Research, Mass General Schizophrenia Clinical and Research Program
Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School


Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD
Director, Psychiatric and Neurodevelopment Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital
Co-Director, Genetics and Genomics Unit, Division of Clinical Research, Mass General Research Institute
Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School


Jennifer Wang, PhD
Senior Research Scientist, Massachusetts General Hospital


Former Clinical Research Coordinators:

  • Ashlee Roberson
  • Hannah Rosenfield
  • Caitlin Clements
  • Sarah Blumenthal

Research Projects

We are currently recruiting patients diagnosed with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

Please call the research coordinator at 617-643-6310 or contact us by email to see if you might be eligible to participate in a study.


The Use of Human Skin in the Creation of Cellular Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

The purpose of this research study is to collect, process and store samples to do research on neuropsychiatric disorders. This research study looks at changes in the human body associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Part of this study involves the collection of skin and blood samples that will be stored in a tissue bank for later use. Research using these samples will attempt to identify causes and what helps prevent, treat, or cure neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition, the samples collected for this study will be used for genetic research on these diseases.

Support

Current and past CQH studies are supported by funding from NIMH, NARSAD, the National Science Foundation, AHRQ, the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute, the American Philosophical Society, the Bowman Family Foundation, and the Sidney J. Baer, Jr. Foundation, as well as by industry partners including Proteus Biomedical.

Publications

For a PubMed listing of Dr. Perlis' articles, please click here.

Perlis RH, Iosifescu DV, Castro VM, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Minnier J, Cai T, Goryachev S, Zeng Q, Gallagher PJ, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Smoller JW. Using electronic medical records to enable large-scale studies in psychiatry: treatment resistant depression as a model. Psychol Med. 2011 Jun 20:1-10.


Gallagher PJ, Castro V, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Iosifescu DV, Smoller JW, Perlis RH. Antidepressant response in individuals with major depressive disorder exposed to NSAIDs: a pharmacovigilance study. Am J Psychiatry 2012;169:1065-1072.


Castro V, Gallagher PJ, Clements CC, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Weilburg JB, Fava M, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Smoller JW, Iosifescu DV, Perlis RH. Incident User Cohort Study of Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleed and Stroke in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder Treated with Antidepressants. Brit Med J Open. 2012 Mar 30;2(2):e000544.


Perlis RH, Perlis CS. Physician payments from industry are associated with greater Medicare part D prescribing costs. PLoS One. 2016 May 16;11(5):e0155474.


Castro VM, Kong SW, Clements CC, Brady R, Kaimal AJ, Doyle AE, Robinson EB, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Perlis RH. Absence of evidence for increase in risk for autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder following antidepressant exposure during pregnancy: a replication study. Transl Psychiatry. 2016 Jan 5;6:e708.


McCoy TH, Castro VM, Cagan A, Roberson AM, Kohane IS, Perlis RH. Sentiment measured in hospital discharge notes is associated with readmission and mortality risk: an electronic health record study. PLoS One. 2015 Aug 24;10(8):e0136341.


McCoy TH, Castro VM, Rosenfield HR, Cagan A, Kohane IS, Perlis RH. A clinical perspective on the relevance of research domain criteria in electronic health records. Am J Psychiatry. 2015 Apr;172(4):316-20.


McCoy TH Jr., Perlis RH. A tool to utilize adverse effect profiles to identify brain-active medications for repurposing. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Feb 11;18(3).


Perlis RH. From bench to bedlam. Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Dec 1;171(12):1233-5.


Castro VM, McCoy TH, Cagan A, Rosenfield HR, Murphy SN, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Perlis RH. Stratification of risk for hospital admissions for injury related to fall: cohort study. BMJ. 2014 Oct 24;349:g5863.


Wang JL, Shamah SM, Sun AX, Waldman ID, Haggarty SJ, Perlis RH. Label-free, live optical imaging of reprogrammed bipolar disorder patient-derived cells reveals a functional correlate of lithium responsiveness. Transl Psychiatry. 2014 Aug 26;4:e428.


Blumenthal SR, Castro VM, Clements CC, Rosenfield HR, Murphy SN, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Erb JL, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Smoller JW, Perlis RH. An electronic health records study of long-term weight gain following antidepressant use. JAMA Psychiatry, 2014 Aug;71(8):889-96.


Perlis RH. A clinical risk stratification tool for predicting treatment resistance in major depressive disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Jul 1;74(1):7-14.


Castro VM, Clements CC, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Erb JL, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Iosifescu DV, Smoller JW, Perlis RH. QT interval and antidepressant use: a cross sectional study of electronic health records. BMJ. 2013 Jan 29;346:f288.


Gallagher PJ, Castro V, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Iosifescu DV, Smoller JW, Perlis RH. Antidepressant response in individuals with major depressive disorder exposed to NSAIDs: a pharmacovigilance study. Am J Psychiatry 2012;169:1065-1072.


Perlis RH, Iosifescu DV, Castro VM, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Minnier J, Cai T, Goryachev S, Zeng Q, Gallagher PJ, Fava M, Weilburg JB, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Smoller JW. Using electronic medical records to enable large-scale studies in psychiatry: treatment resistant depression as a model. Psychol Med. 2012 Jan;42(1):41-50.


Castro V, Gallagher PJ, Clements CC, Murphy SN, Gainer VS, Weilburg JB, Fava M, Churchill SE, Kohane IS, Smoller JW, Iosifescu DV, Perlis RH. Incident User Cohort Study of Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleed and Stroke in Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder Treated with Antidepressants. Brit Med J Open. 2012 Mar 30;2(2):e000544.


Perlis RH. Betting on biomarkers. Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;168(3):234-6.


Perlis RH, Uher R, Ostacher M, Goldberg JF, Trivedi MH, Rush AJ, Fava M. Association between bipolar spectrum features and treatment outcomes in outpatients with major depressive disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;68(4):351-60.


Blood AJ, Iosifescu DV, Makris N, Perlis RH, Kennedy DN, Dougherty DD, Kim BW, Lee MJ, Wu S, Lee S, Calhoun J, Hodge SM, Fava M, Rosen BR, Smoller JW, Gasic GP, Breiter HC; Phenotype Genotype Project on Addiction and Mood Disorders. Microstructural abnormalities in subcortical reward circuitry of subjects with major depressive disorder. PLoS One. 2010 Nov 29;5(11):e13945.


Schosser A, Butler AW, Ising M, Perroud N, Uher R, Ng MY, Cohen-Woods S, Craddock N, Owen MJ, Korszun A, Jones L, Jones I, Gill M, Rice JP, Maier W, Mors O, Rietschel M, Lucae S, Binder EB, Preisig M, Perry J, Tozzi F, Muglia P, Aitchison KJ, Breen G, Craig IW, Farmer AE, Müller-Myhsok B, McGuffin P, Lewis CM. Genomewide association scan of suicidal thoughts and behaviour in major depression. PLoS One. 2011;6(7):e20690.


Perlis RH. Can single genes matter in a polygenic world? Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Nov 1;68(9):783-4.


Casamassima F, Hay AC, Benedetti A, Lattanzi L, Cassano GB, Perlis RH. L-type calcium channels and psychiatric disorders: A brief review. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2010 Dec 5;153B(8):1373-90.


Simon GE, Perlis RH. Personalized medicine for depression: can we match patients with treatments? Am J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;167(12):1445-55.


Perlis RH, Ostacher MJ, Goldberg JF, Miklowitz DJ, Friedman E, Calabrese J, Thase ME, Sachs GS. Transition to mania during treatment of bipolar depression. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2010 Dec;35(13):2545-52.


Huang J, Perlis RH, Lee PH, Rush AJ, Fava M, Sachs GS, Lieberman J, Hamilton SP, Sullivan P, Sklar P, Purcell S, Smoller JW. Cross-disorder genomewide analysis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. Am J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;167(10):1254-63.


Bogdan R, Perlis RH, Fagerness J, Pizzagalli DA. The impact of mineralocorticoid receptor ISO/VAL genotype (rs5522) and stress on reward learning. Genes Brain Behav. 2010 Aug;9(6):658-67.


Miller KK, Perlis RH, Papakostas GI, Mischoulon D, Losifescu DV, Brick DJ, Fava M. Low-dose transdermal testosterone augmentation therapy improves depression severity in women. CNS Spectr. 2009 Dec;14(12):688-94.

Contact

Contact Us

Center for Quantitative Health

Richard B. Simches Research Building

185 Cambridge St. Boston, MA 02114
  • Near Public Transit
  • Accessible
  • Phone: 617-643-6310

Contact us by email
Directions to Richard B. Simches Research Building
185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114

 


Get Directions and View Larger Map

Contact the Center by email

Contact us by phone 617-643-6310

Back to Top