Research Centers

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Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care Biorepository

The Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care Biorepository advances cardiovascular and cerebrovascular research by providing data to help researchers understand how genes and other factors contribute to conditions such as heart disease, vascular disease and stroke.

Transforming Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care

Institute staff discuss the Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care Biorepository

Patients meet with Institute Biorepository staff to learn more about the project.

The Massachusetts General Hospital Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care Biorepository serves as a resource for clinicians and scientists who conduct research to learn how genes and other factors contribute to conditions such as heart disease, vascular disease and stroke.

A biorepository is a collection of blood and other biological samples that are obtained and stored for future research. Patients who participate allow our researchers to use information from their blood samples and medical history as tools for medical research. By taking part in this initiative, you are contributing to research that may help in predicting, preventing and treating disease.

Contributing to the Future of Personalized Medicine

The goal of the Institute Biorepository is to create a robust resource to support researchers who will contribute to the future of personalized medicine. We envision a future where doctors can treat their patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease using methods that are precisely targeted to patients’ individual needs. The Institute Biorepository will help achieve this goal by:

  • Incorporating innovative research into patient care  
  • Providing opportunities for participants to take part in other clinical studies
  • Facilitating high-quality research in the areas of genetics and personalized medicine 
  • Fostering collaboration among researchers throughout the Institute
  • Encouraging scientific innovation and providing  support to investigators to cultivate new ideas

Participating in the Biorepository

Stored blood samples are used in research to help new treatments in cardiovascular disease.

Stored samples are used in research to learn more about detecting, preventing and treating cardiovascular disease.

Patients can learn more about the Institute Biorepository before or after their appointment with an Institute health care provider. Staff will be available to explain the process and answer any questions that you may have. Participation is completely voluntary. If you decide to participate, you will be asked to fill out a consent form and provide some health information for our database. A small blood sample will be taken by our staff. This blood sample and your health data will be stored for future analysis by Mass General.

We take patient privacy very seriously. As a participant, you can be assured that we will:

  • Use your collected information for research purposes only
  • Keep your personal information strictly private and confidential 
  • Keep your identifiable health information separate from the research record. All samples will receive a random identification number and will not be connected to your personal information

As part of your participation, we may:

  • Access your Partners Healthcare medical records for research purposes only
  • Contact you in the future and ask you to provide additional information or to give additional blood samples

Learn More

To learn more about the Institute Biorepository, call 617-643-3147 or email IHVSBio@Partners.org.

 

 

 

Jonathan Rosand, MD, MSc

Jonathan Rosand, MD, MSc

Jonathan Rosand, MD, MSc, is a stroke and critical care neurologist with expertise in the genetics of complex diseases. He is a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, the J. Philip Kistler Neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and chief of the Mass General  Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology. He received his medical degree from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and served as intern, resident, chief resident and fellow at Mass General.

Following postdoctoral research training in genetics and clinical investigation, Professor Rosand established a multidisciplinary research group within the Mass General Center for Human Genetic Research and the Broad Institute of Harvard University  and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

He now combines research with an active practice as a vascular and critical care neurologist. Through the careful characterization of a hospital-based cohort of patients with cerebrovascular disease, Professor Rosand’s group has made substantial advances in understanding the biology of hemorrhagic stroke, led the discovery of genetic risk factors for stroke in the era of genome-wide association studies and developed tools to support clinical decision making. The success of his group has been driven by the outstanding junior investigators it continues to attract. The author of more than 150 scientific publications, Professor Rosand brought together the team that established the International Stroke Genetics Consortium in 2007.

 
Sekar Kathiresan, MD

Sekar Kathiresan, MD

Sekar Kathiresan, MD, is a clinical cardiologist and human geneticist. Dr. Kathiresan seeks to discover the genes responsible for inter-individual differences in risk for heart attack and to use this information to understand biologic mechanisms and improve preventive cardiac care.

Dr. Kathiresan is the director of preventive cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, a genetics researcher in the Broad Institute’s Program in Medical and Population Genetics as well as an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He received his Bachelor of Arts  in history and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. He received his Doctorate of Medicine. from Harvard Medical School in 1997. Dr. Kathiresan completed his clinical training in internal medicine and cardiology atMass General . He served as chief resident in internal medicine at Mass General in 2002-2003. Dr. Kathiresan pursued research training in cardiovascular genetics through a combined experience at the Framingham Heart Study and the Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. In 2008, he joined the research faculties of the Mass General  Cardiovascular Research Center  and the Mass General Center for Human Genetic Research. 

 
 Robert Gerszten, MD

Robert Gerszten, MD, co-investigator

Robert Gerszten, MD, is the director of Clinical and Translational Research for the Mass General Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care. He is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and also a senior associate member of the Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. Dr. Gerszten graduated from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and did his clinical and research training in Cardiology at Mass General. Over the past decade, his laboratory has built a collaborative program in translational research, integrating emerging metabolomic and proteomic approaches towards the identification of novel disease pathways and biomarkers. An area of particular focus is the application of these tools to identify those most likely to benefit from clinical interventions in cardiometabolic diseases.  His highly interactive program collaborates across a spectrum of institutions, from the Broad Institute to the Framingham Heart Study and the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group.

Institute for Heart, Vascular and Stroke Care Biorepository

Phone: 617-643-3147
Email: IHVSBio@Partners.org