Neonatal Hepatology Program

The Neonatal Hepatology Program is a novel multidisciplinary program that draws on the expertise of several specialties, including Neonatology, Pediatric Hepatology, Pediatric Nutrition, Pediatric Surgery, Medical Genetics and Metabolism and Pediatric Imaging.

Contact Us: 617-724-4310

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Overview

The Neonatal Hepatology Program at MassGeneral Hospital for Children is a multidisciplinary program that draws on the expertise of several specialties, including Neonatology, Pediatric Hepatology, Pediatric Infectious Disease, Hematology, the Fetal Care Program, Pediatric Transplant SurgeryPediatric Nutrition, Pediatric Surgery, Medical Genetics and Metabolism and Pediatric Imaging. The collaboration allows for the careful evaluation and management of distinct and complex liver disease in newborns.

Under the direction of Uzma Shah, MBBS, and Serguei Roumiantsev, MD, PhD, the program improves clinical care, defines processes and guidelines and fosters academic development and research.

The Neonatal Hepatology Program allows providers to give better clinical care to infants with distinct and complex liver disease and formalizes an already collaborative approach to patient care from various specialties and sub-specialties.

 

Photo of Uzma Shah and Serguei Roumiantsev
Dr. Uzma Shah and Dr. Serguei Roumiantsev, co-directors of the Neonatal Hepatology Program.

 

 

 

"At MGHfC, we are in a unique position to have neonatal, pediatric and adult care under one roof. With better clinical care, we can meet our patients’ unique needs and better support patients, families and staff." - Dr. Serguei Roumiantsev

Meet the Team

The Neonatal Hepatology Program at MassGeneral Hospital for Children is a multidisciplinary program that draws on the expertise of several specialties including:

Conditions We Treat

The Neonatal Hepatology Program treats the full range of liver conditions in newborns including:

  • Neonatal jaundice
  • Inherited metabolic liver disease
  • Biliary atresia
  • Liver failure
  • Neonatal hepatitis
  • Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease

Family-Focused Care

Parents can rest assured that every comfort and convenience has been added to ensure their experience is made easier while their child is in the NICU. Parents are welcome in the unit at any time. There is dedicated parent space at each infant’s bedside and parents may remain at their infant’s bedside throughout the night. Computer stations are available with Internet and email access. Healthy siblings are welcome to visit as well; a fish tank and children’s reading area are located in the NICU for their enjoyment. Families using the Angel Eye system may log in here.

A dedicated social worker help parents cope with the ongoing medical needs and support required when their baby is discharged. Support and parent advocacy groups and educational programs are available.

News

  • MGHfC celebrates 10th annual Research Day - 4/6/2018, Mass General

    This year, MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) celebrated its 10th annual Research Day, an event that recognizes the pioneering research of investigators throughout the hospital whose discoveries help to better understand childhood health and disease.

  • MGHfC Introduces Neonatal Hepatology Program - 1/9/2018, Mass General

    MGHfC is pleased to announce the launch of the Neonatal Hepatology Program, a novel multidisciplinary program that allows for the careful evaluation and management of distinct and complex liver disease in newborns.

  • The Purple Butterfly Project Brings Hope, Healing and Legacy to NICU Families and Staff - 7/14/2017, Mass General

    This past spring, MGHfC introduced the Purple Butterfly Project to honor the lives of babies who were part of a multiple pregnancy and passed away. The stickers also serve as a reminder to hospital staff of the family’s loss.

  • A Brave Decision for Lifesaving Care Helps Baby Elias Thrive - 7/7/2017, Mass General

    Shortly after birth, Elias Asry was fussy and feverish. After a few tests and several attempts to calm him, he was diagnosed with early onset septicemia from E. coli bacteria in his bloodstream. To help him heal and get much needed oxygen back into his body, Elias was placed on a form of life support called ECMO. Four months after discharge, Elias is happy and healthy.

  • A Strong Support System Away From Home Helps Baby Lucy Thrive - 6/29/2017, Mass General

    Julie Blake was 7 1/2 months pregnant when her daughter, Lucy, was diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). When she was transferred to MGHfC from Dresden, Maine, almost four hours away, multiple teams from MGHfC, including Fetal Care, the NICU and Pediatric Surgery, came together to form the support system that the Blakes needed while far away from home.

  • A return to the NICU: Positive moments with a personal touch - 6/9/2017, Mass General

    Becoming a mom can be overwhelming. Sleepless night, developing a new routine and learning an infant’s queues can lead to anxiety and stress. For infants with unexpected health complications, their parents worry only multiplies. That was case for Memmolo family.

  • A Royal Reception at MGHfC - 4/26/2017, Mass General

    Their Royal Highnesses Crown Prince Alexander and Crown Princess Katherine of Serbia visited MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) on April 24 for a special tour of the hospital’s cutting-edge facilities.

  • Infant Intervention: Saving Mihaly - 4/26/2017, Mass General

    Before the birth of Rose's twins, prenatal testing showed one baby may have an intestinal blockage. Hours after Mihaly was born, MGHfC surgeons performed a life-saving surgery.

  • Bagian Kicks Off Patient Safety Awareness Week - 3/20/2017, Mass General

    James Bagian, MD, PE, professor of Engineering Practice and Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering, was honored as this year’s Safety Scholar at the 8th annual Patient Safety Awareness Week at MGHfC from March 12-18. Bagian, a former astronaut, presented his talk, “Patient Safety – It’s Not Rocket Science,” which gave insights on patient safety and how cultural changes matter most when making hospitals safer for patients.

  • This Mom is Carrying her Terminally Ill Child to Term to Save Lives - 3/16/2017, Mass General

    Article in Self magazine quotes Jeanne Macdonald, MD, director of MassGeneral Hospital for Children Perinatal Palliative Care service.

  • Sweet Support for NICU Families - 3/2/2017, Mass General

    Becoming a mom can be overwhelming. Sleepless night, developing a new routine and learning an infant’s queues can lead to anxiety and stress. For infants with unexpected health complications, their parents worry only multiplies. That’s the case for Mary Memmolo.

  • New NICU Celebrates 10 Years of Giving Hope to Babies and Their Families - 12/6/2016, Mass General

    For NICU staff, August 2016 marked 10 years of providing care for MGHfC’s most fragile patients and their families in a new space. The new NICU first opened in August 2006 and became a sacred space where staff and families shared life’s most difficult and beautiful moments and formed long-term bonds with one another.

  • Doctors help babies born addicted to heroin - 5/11/2016, Mass General

    Teens, adults, and now the rise of a new generation affected by the opioid crisis. According to federal statistics, every 25 seconds a baby is born-- helpless and hooked on opioids. Their battle to get clean is heart-wrenching.

  • As Mass. Grapples With Opioid Crisis, More Babies Are Being Born Exposed To Drugs - 3/26/2016, Mass General

    Massachusetts hospitals are seeing evidence that the opioid epidemic is affecting the next generation, with an increasing number of babies being born exposed to drugs. The most recent state hospital data suggest that the rate of drug-dependent newborns has skyrocketed to about 16 in every 1,000 births — about three times the national average.

  • Saugus baby thriving after being born 100 days too soon - 3/14/2016, Mass General

    While preterm birth affects about one of every 10 infants born in the United States, you never imagine that your baby will be that one. For Saugus resident Catherine Lopez, that was her reality, when her son Matthew Evans-Lopez was born at just 24 weeks.

  • A New Direction On Drugs - 12/13/2015, Mass General

    After 40 years and a trillion dollars, the nation has little to show for its war on drugs. Prisons are beyond crowded and there's a new outbreak in the heroin epidemic.

  • Paul Lerou, MD, named chief of Neonatology - 11/6/2015, Mass General

    Paul Lerou, MD, has been appointed chief of Neonatology and Newborn Medicine for MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) effective Oct. 1. Lerou succeeds Jonathan Cronin, MD, who will remain a member of the MGH’s clinical faculty in the Patty Ribakoff Newborn Intensive Care Unit.

  • The Neonatal Transport Program at MassGeneral Hospital for Children - 7/1/2015, Mass General

    MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston MedFlight, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital provide care to critically ill newborns through the Neonatal Transport Program.

  • A Premature Baby Follows Her Dreams - 6/25/2012, Mass General

    An early surprise to her family, former MassGeneral Hospital for Children patient Keri White was born premature at 28 weeks in her Newton, New Hampshire home. Although she has faced many challenges growing up, Keri has proven herself as a fighter and is pursuing her passion.

Contact

For Physicians: Referrals and Consultation Services

Referring pediatricians and specialists who seek a consultation or second opinion from a MassGeneral Hospital for Children neonatologist are invited to contact the Newborn Intensive Care Unit 24 hours a day via Boston MedFlight communication center 1-800-233-8998. Referrals may be also made by calling the unit directly 617-724-4310.

Outpatient Referrals and Appointments

For referrals to our outpatient service or for patients wishing to make an appointment, please contact the Pediatric Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Disease Center at 888-644-3211.

Contact Us: 617-724-4310

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