Faculty

  • Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH

    Dr. Andrew T. Chan is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Chief of the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, and Program Director of Gastroenterology fellowship at Mass General. He also co-leads the Cancer Epidemiology Program at the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center.

    He aims to advance epidemiologic investigation for the translation of discoveries into effective clinical interventions. His current focus is on chronic digestive diseases, including gastrointestinal cancer (colorectal, esophageal, pancreatic), inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, and gastrointestinal bleeding. His group utilizes molecular approaches encompassing genetic, metabolomic, proteomic, and biochemical platforms applied to populations ranging from large cohort studies to small biomarker-driven clinical trials. He also has an active program studying the oral and gut microbiome as a determinant and mediator of chronic disease.

    Dr. Chan earned his MD from Harvard Medical School and a MPH from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He completed his internal medicine residency, chief residency, and gastroenterology fellowship at Mass General. He is the Stuart and Suzanne Steele MGH Research Scholar. He was awarded the 2016 Martin Prize for Clinical Research by the MGH Executive Committee on Research and is an Elected Fellow of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. His group is supported by several grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, and several foundations.

  • Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, MD, MPH

    Dr. Ashwin Ananthakrishnan is the Director of the Mass General Crohn’s and Colitis Center. He completed his medical school training at JIPMER in India and subsequently obtained his Masters in Public Health degree at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. After completing his GI fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin, he joined the faculty at Mass General where he is involved in clinical care, research, and teaching. In addition to his clinical expertise in the management of patients with complex inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), he has been involved in NIH-funded investigations using large prospective cohorts to define for the first time an important role for factors such as diet, vitamin D, stress, and sleep and determine how they may be altered to prevent disease or improve the course of established IBD. He is also conducting studies aimed to understand how an individual¹s genetics and composition of their intestinal microbiome may predispose them to developing IBD, and how they can be used to determine which treatments may be of greatest benefit in each patient. He has published over 180 manuscripts, has co-authored a textbook in IBD, and serves on multiple Editorial Boards of major GI journals.

  • Jennifer Chen, MD

    Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School

  • Kathleen Corey, MD, MPH

    Kathleen E Corey, MD, MPH, MMSc, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Mass General Fatty Liver Clinic in the Mass General Gastrointestinal Unit.

    Dr. Corey's clinical interests include all areas of hepatology including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), viral hepatitis including hepatitis B, C and D infection, autoimmune hepatitis, cholestatic liver disease including primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In addition, Dr. Corey treats patients with hereditary forms of liver disease including hemochromatosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin disease. Dr. Corey is also a transplant hepatologist and evaluates patients in need of liver transplantation and cares for patients after liver transplant. Dr. Corey also performs endoscopies including diagnostic and therapeutic upper endoscopy and colonoscopy.

    Dr. Corey's research focuses on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and the development of non-invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD.  Dr. Corey has lectured regionally and nationally on NAFLD.

  • Manish Gala, MD

    Dr. Gala is an attending gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. His interests include hereditary colon cancer syndrome, molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, and colorectal adenoma. Dr. Gala earned his MD at Harvard Medical School. He completed his training in internal medicine at Stanford University before completing gastroenterology fellowship at Mass General.

  • Jennifer Ho, MD

    Dr. Ho is a cardiologist in the Heart Failure and Transplantation section of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cardiology Division and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She sees patients with advanced heart failure.

    Dr. Ho is a faculty member of the Cardiovascular Research Center, and also maintains an affiliation with the Framingham Heart Study. Her laboratory is focused on clinical and translational patient-oriented investigations to understand mechanisms driving heart failure and cardiometabolic disease, with a particular focus on heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. She is a recipient of the MGH Claflin Distinguished Scholar Award (2017), an MGH Hassenfeld Scholar Award (2016), and multiple NIH grants to support her research laboratory.

  • Chin Hur, MD, MPH

    Chin Hur, MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Director of GI Health Outcomes Research at the Mass General Division of Gastroenterology. Dr. Hur received his M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Johns Hopkins University and completed his Internal Medicine residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He subsequently completed his fellowship in Gastroenterology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and then joined the faculty of the MGH Gastrointestinal Unit in 2002.

    Dr. Hur's areas of clinical areas of interests include: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma as well as gastrointestinal cancer screening. He is also interested in benign esophageal conditions such as eosinophilic esophagitis.

    His research interest lies in outcomes research, with a focus on decision analysis and simulation disease modeling, and the application of these methodologies to the management of cancers and pre-malignant states (e.g. dysplasia) in the gastrointestinal tract. This management includes the identification of clinical predictors, diagnostic algorithms, and the optimization of treatment. As an acknowledged investigator in health outcomes research, he has been the recipient of numerous awards from the National Institutes of Health as well other research foundations.

  • Amit Joshi, MBBS, PhD

    Dr. Amit Joshi is an Investigator in the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit in Massachusetts General Hospital, and an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is a molecular epidemiologist by training, with a background in clinical medicine.

    His research interests include studying the risk of breast, prostate and colorectal cancers, and gastrointestinal diseases, using high-dimensional genomic  data. To study these outcomes, he has conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and studies of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on the relative and absolute risk scales. He is also currently involved in studying gut microbial and metabolomic risk factors of symptomatic gallbladder disease and cholecystectomy outcomes.

    Dr. Joshi earned his MBBS from B.J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, India. He holds a MS in Molecular Epidemiology prior to obtaining a PhD in Molecular Epidemiology from University of Southern California.

  • Hamed Khalili, MD, MPH

    Dr. Khalili is a gastroenterologist specialized in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) at Mass General and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

    His interests include clinical and translational research in the field of IBD. He aims to better understand the environmental risk factors, particularly dietary, reproductive, and lifestyle factors, for the development IBD. He has been involved in NIH-funded research to study the complex interplay between common genetic risk loci and gut microbial environment on risk and progression of IBD.

    Dr. Khalili earned his MD and completed his training in internal medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Before joining the faculty at MGH, he completed Gastroenterology and Advanced IBD fellowship at Mass General and obtained an MPH from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

  • Jay Luther, MD

    Jay Luther, MD attended Cornell University for undergraduate studies and SUNY at Syracuse for medical school. He then attended the University of Michigan for Internal Medicine Residency, during which time he was awarded an NIH research fellowship. Jay also completed his gastroenterology and hepatology fellowship at the Mass General. Jay grew up in Buffalo, NY and remains an avid Sabres and Bills fan.

  • Alisa Manning, PhD

    Dr. Manning is an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, an Associated Scientist at Program in Medical and Population Genetics at Broad Institute, and an Assistant Investigator at Clinical Translational Epidemiology Unit at Mass General.

    Dr. Manning is a statistical geneticits with an established focus on glycemic traits and a recent focus on integrative analyses of whole genome sequence data. She has been exploring the link between genetic associations and phenotype refinement since 2005. Her Lab studies the molecular and mechanistic basis of insulin resistance and obesity and is known for developing statistical strategies for translational epidemiology using whole genome sequence association studies, physiological and molecular studies in humans and integrative analytics, with the overarching goal to understand the relationship between Genes, Environment and Disease and to foster a stimulating and interdisciplinary research environment with local and international collaborators on a range of projects.

    Dr. Manning earned her PhD from Boston University.

  • Anne Marie McCarthy, PhD

    Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School

     

  • Megan Rice, ScD, MPH

    Dr. Rice is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an epidemiologist in the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Her research focus is to better understand breast and ovarian cancer risk by incorporating molecular markers in epidemiologic studies of lifestyle factors. She is a collaborator in several prospective cohorts, including the Nurses' Health Studies and the Mexican Teachers' Cohort.

    Dr. Rice earned an ScD in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health as well as a MPH in Epidemiology/Biostatistics from the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Mingyang Song, MD, ScD

    Dr. Mingyang Song is an Instructor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. His research focuses on the role of diet and lifestyle factors, in conjunction with the host immune system and gut microbiome, in colorectal cancer prevention and survivorship. He has extensive research experience in nutritional, genetic, and molecular epidemiology. He is particularly interested in integrating large-scale population studies with biomarker-based randomized controlled trials to identify novel nutrition- and gut microbiota-targeted strategies for cancer prevention and treatment.

    Currently, he is the Assistant Director for the MICRObiome Among Nurses (MICRO-N) Study, a large prospective microbiome study of 25,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. He is also a member of the Cancer Epidemiology and Gastrointestinal Malignancies Programs at Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center.

  • Kyle Staller, MD, MPH

    Kyle D. Staller, MD, MPH is an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and a member of the Center for Neurointestinal Health and the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Mass General. He is interested in disorders of gastrointestinal motility and neurogastroenterology.

    Dr. Staller's clinical interests are focused on treating patients with gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders. In his practice he cares for patients with conditions including achalasia, chronic constipation, fecal incontinence, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, irritable bowel syndrome, and swallowing disorders. He also interprets gastrointestinal motility studies including esophageal manometry, pH studies, anorectal manometry, and wireless motility capsules. Dr. Staller also performs endoscopies including diagnostic and therapeutic upper endoscopies and colonoscopies as well as Bravo pH probe placements and pneumatic dilations for achalasia.

  • Erica Warner, ScD, MPH

    Dr. Warner is an Assistant Professor in the Department Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an Assistant Investigator at Massachusetts General Hospital where she conducts epidemiological research on cancer. She is also Research Associate at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the Department of Epidemiology. She is a member of the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center in the Cancer Epidemiology and Risk and Health Disparities Programs.  Dr. Warner is a cancer epidemiologist, studying how lifestyle, behavioral and genetic factors affect risk of cancer, particularly aggressive subtypes.  She also examines factors that lead to more aggressive subtypes of cancer and higher risk of cancer mortality in minority populations.  Dr. Warner’s work appears in leading public health, medical, oncology, and epidemiology journals. Dr. Warner’s recent work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Aetna Foundation and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Warner has a bachelor's degree from Duke University and a master's in public health degree (MPH) from Yale School of Public Health. Dr. Warner completed her doctorate and the Alonzo Smythe Yerby Postdoctoral Fellowship, both in Epidemiology, at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Research Team

Research Fellows

  • David Drew, PhD

    Dr. Drew is a Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital within the CTEU and the Division of Gastroenterology.

    His long-term research has focused on the prevention of gastrointestinal disorders, primarily GI cancers, through chemoprevention, lifestyle modification, or enhanced endoscopic screening methods. Recently, this interest has been focused on the molecular mechanisms, particularly those influenced by the gut microbiome, driving gastrointestinal disease and cancer, and the mechanisms by which pharmacologic agents, such as aspirin, prevent or contribute to the development of GI disorders. Broadly, his training has provided him strong foundations in basic and translational research, the gut microbiome, colorectal carcinogenesis, precision prevention, epidemiology/biostatistics, and cancer genetics.

    Dr. Drew earned a PhD in Biomedical Science from the University of Connecticut and also holds a B.S. in Biochemistry/Biophysics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

  • Xiosheng He, MD, PhD

    Dr. He is a colorectal surgeon from China. His research focus is on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis. He joins the CTEU at Mass General in 2017 as a research fellow. His current project includes dietary fiber and risk of colorectal adenoma.

  • Manol Jovani, MD

    Dr. Jovani is a Research Fellow in the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Division of Gastroenterology, at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

    His research projects include identification of risk factors for Barrett’s esophagus, identification of risk factors for diverticulitis, identification of early biomarkers of cancer incidence and cancer-related death, novel technologies for the identification of gastrointestinal malignancies, and quality improvement in colonoscopy.

    Dr. Jovani earned an MD from the University of Bologna (Italy), specialized in Gastroenterology in Milan (Italy), and obtained an MPH from the Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health.

  • Paul Lochhead, MBChB, PhD

    Paul trained as a gastroenterologist in the UK and subsequently completed advanced clinical training in inflammatory bowel diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital. During his doctoral studies in the UK, Paul spent a year as a Knox Memorial Fellow at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute where he worked on the molecular pathology and epidemiology of colorectal cancer survival. Paul joined the CTEU as a research fellow in 2015 and has been involved in a number of gastrointestinal epidemiologic studies involving the Harvard prospective cohorts. Paul’s current research interests include investigating the role of medication, lifestyle and environmental factors in the development and progression of IBD. Paul is supported by a career development award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation.

  • Wenjie Ma, MBBS, ScD

    Wenjie joined the CTEU in 2017 with extensive training and research experience in nutritional, genetic, and molecular epidemiology. Her research interests include understanding the etiology and developing intervention strategies for colorectal cancer, diverticulitis, and cardiovascular diseases and examining the role of gut microbiome in inflammation and diseases. Wenjie earned her ScD in Epidemiology from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Before coming to the US, she graduated from Peking University in 2012 with a Bachelor’s degree in Medicine.

  • Long Nguyen, MD, MS

    Dr. Nguyen is a Clinical and Research Fellow in Gastroenterology & Hepatology and physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    His research focuses on the influence of dietary patterns, medication usage, and other lifestyle exposures on the gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer.

    Dr. Nguyen earned an M.D. from the Stanford University School of Medicine and also holds an M.S. in Epidemiology & Clinical Research from Stanford University.

Medical Residents

  • Raaj Mehta, MD

    Dr. Mehta is a Stanbury Service resident in Internal Medicine at the Massachussetts General Hospital. His research interests lie at the intersection of epidemiology, microbiology, and immunology. He received an AB from Princeton University and an MD from Harvard University. He was a Fulbright scholar to Ecuador from 2010 to 2011 and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Medical Research Fellow from 2014 to 2015. He plans to be an academic gastroenterologist.

Research Coordinators

  • Stuart Po-Hong Liu, MD, MPH

    Dr. Liu is a gastroenterologist from Taiwan. His research focus on the prognosis modeling of liver cancer. He joins the CTEU at Mass General in 2016 as a research student and has been involved in epidemiological studies including risk factors of diverticulitis, young-onset colorectal cancer, and microscopic colitis. Dr. Liu earned his M.D. from the National Yang-Ming University in Taiwan and also holds an M.P.H. in quantitative methods from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. As of June 2018, he will join the Internal Medicine Physician Scientist Training Program of UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

  • Dana Meixell

    Dana joined the CTEU at Mass General in June 2017. She graduated from Quinnipiac University in 2016 with a BS in Biomedical Sciences and a minor in Psychology and spent one year in a hospital patient care setting before joining the team. She works as a research coordinator on several clinical trials studying GI cancer prevention and detection. 

  • Melanie Parziale

    Melanie joined the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Mass General in August 2016. She graduated from Wesleyan University in 2016 with a BA in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry and Theater. Melanie is currently working on the ASPIRED trial.

  • Madeline Schuck, MS

    Madeline joined the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Mass General in January 2016 following two years as a Research Technologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. She graduated from Marist College in 2010 with a BS in Biomedical Sciences. In 2012, she graduated from the University of Manchester (UK) with an MSc in Immunology and Immunogenetics. Maddie works on several clinical studies within the CTEU, most notably the ASPIRED and Lumicell trials. As of May 2018, Maddie will be enrolled in the MGH Institute of Health Professions Master of Physician Assistant Studies program.

  • Dylan Zerjav

Research Technician

  • Emily Pond

    Emily joined the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit as a technician in May 2016. She graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 2016 with a degree in Chemistry. Emily currently works on the ASPIRED trial, as well as other projects with collaborators at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health. As of July 2018, Emily will be pursuing a Master’s in Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Programmer

  • Elaine Coughlan-Gifford

Administrative Assistant

  • Julie Wusenich

Alumni

  • Yin Cao, ScD

    Dr. Cao is currently an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Siteman Cancer Center. She has extensive training and research experience in genetic, molecular, and nutritional epidemiology, and was an Instructor in Medicine in the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School (2015-2017). She is a cancer epidemiologist focusing on risk prediction, screening and early detection, and chemoprevention of gastrointestinal malignancies. Her current research areas include the etiology of young-onset colorectal cancer, the biological basis for colorectal cancer disparity, the role of microbiome and host immunity in carcinogenesis, and the development of precision aspirin chemoprevention guidelines. She will utilize -omic technologies, informatics tools, and methods in decision and implementation sciences, to develop personalized cancer prevention and control strategies.

    Dr. Cao earned a ScD in Epidemiology from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 2013. Prior to that, she obtained her MPH degree from Columbia University.

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