Explore the Geriatric Fracture Guide

Frequently Asked Questions

How soon can I go home?

Your recovery from your injury will start in the hospital and continue in other settings.

Patients often spend about 4-5 days in the hospital after a fracture. Often patients continue their recovery in settings such as a rehabilitation hospital or skilled nursing facility.

The time you spend rehabilitating from your injury depends on how quickly you are able to recover and build the strength/balance you need to walk safely.

How soon can I walk again?

Your weight bearing status will be explained to you before you leave the hospital. If you are able to bear weight as tolerated, you can put more weight on your leg as it feels comfortable to do so.

If you are considered non-, touch down-, or partial weight bearing, your surgeon will evaluate you at your next appointment to determine whether it is safe for you to bear more weight.

Do not forget to use the ambulatory aid recommended by your surgeon/physiatrist.

Why did this happen to me and will it happen again?

If you broke your bone when you fell from your own height, you may have osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a condition where the bones become weak and can break from a minor fall or activity that would not normally cause a bone to break.

Lifestyle changes and certain medications prescribed by your physician can help prevent bone loss, increase bone density, and reduce your risk of future fractures.

How long will it take to heal?

Most fractures take one year to fully heal. The first four months are considered the healing phase, while the last eight months – called the remodeling phase – are when the bone attempts to become like it was prior to your injury. Over time your fractured bone becomes stronger and you should be able to resume many of your regular activities.

How long will I need to take medication?

It depends on the kind of medication you are taking. If you are taking blood-thinning medication like aspirin, dalteparin, enoxaparin or warfarin, or antibiotics for infection you will need to take these drugs for as long as the doctor thinks is necessary. If you are taking pain medication, you should only take this medication when needed.

What’s going to happen to me while I’m in the hospital?

Surgeons, geriatricians, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, nurses and others will make sure you are ready for surgery and take care of you after surgery. A case manager will help your transition to a rehabilitation facility or to home with services. The entire care team will work with you to optimize your recovery and help you get back to the activities that are important to you.





Patient Resources

Image Alt
Before Surgery

Before Surgery

What to expect before your fracture surgery.

Image Alt
After Surgery

After Surgery

What to expect after your fracture surgery.

Image Alt
Discharge Information

Discharge Information

Discharge information after your fracture surgery.

Icon Alt
Your Recovery

Your Recovery

Your recovery after fracture surgery.

Icon alt
Fall Prevention

Fall Prevention

Fall prevention tips and information.

#
Osteoporosis & Bone Health

Osteoporosis & Bone Health

Osteoporosis and bone health for our patients.