Research in Behavioral Medicine

The Behavioral Medicine Program at Massachusetts General Hospital is at the forefront of research focused on developing, validating and disseminating psychosocial interventions to help individuals with a variety of health and medical issues.

Overview

The research conducted by the scientiests of the Behavioral Medicine Program is focused on developing and validating new psychosocial interventions to help individuals with a variety of health and medical issues. This research is conducted both domestically and internationally across three continents.

We always have a number of studies running, many in need of participants.  If you are interested in participating in our research, please see our lists of active research to learn more:

Domestic Research

  • Developing a resilience intervention for older, HIV-Infected women

    Principal Investigator: Christina Psaros, PhD
    Funding Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
    Project Number: 1R34AT009170

    Description: The number of older, HIV-infected women in the U.S. is growing. In fact, it is estimated that approximately 50% of the HIV-infected population will be over age 50 by 2020, and a significant percent of women, particularly women of color, continue to be impacted by HIV/AIDS. Additionally, the experience of aging with HIV results in complex biopsychosocial challenges for women, which are experienced as stressors. Despite this, few interventions have been developed for older adults with HIV, and none have focused on women. The goal of this project is to adapt a mind-body resiliency intervention to the needs of HIV-infected women over 50 and conduct preliminary testing of the group intervention via an open pilot study with up to 40 participants. Based on our qualitative work, we will conduct an open pilot study of the intervention in groups of 5-8 women with HIV to assess feasibility and acceptability. We will conduct individual exit interviews to solicit feedback on the intervention, including experiences with the assessment protocol, intervention consent, number and duration of sessions, etc.

    Potential participants: We are looking to recruit biologically born woman age 50 or over who are living with HIV, speak English, and may benefit from learning additional skills to improve resilience. The program is designed to occur in groups of 5-8 women (total of up to 40 participants), and consist of eight weekly 90-minute sessions. 

    For more information, please contact: Elsa Sweek (617-643-4566) or Georgia Goodman (617-726-3679).


  • Developing a pilot lifestyle intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease among HIV-infected women

    Principal Investigator: Greer A. Raggio, PhD, MPH
    Funding Source: Harvard University CFAR/NIH/NIAID

    Description: Cardiovascular disease contributes to 10-15% of deaths among people living with HIV in North America, and HIV-infected women have a 50% greater relative risk for incident cardiovascular disease than HIV-infected men. Older HIV-infected women in particular face unique challenges that may impede adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, no existing lifestyle interventions target older HIV-infected women. 

    In this study, we will:

    1. Conduct qualitative interviews in a sample of older HIV-infected women in the Boston area, many of whom will demonstrate moderate to high risk for developing cardiovascular disease
    2. Develop and pilot test a scalable lifestyle intervention based on the qualitative data and modeled on the CDC-recognized Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    For more information, please contact: Georgia Goodman (617-726-3679).


  • Understanding and addressing internalized stigma and shame as barriers to engagement in HIV care

    Principal Investigator: Abigail Batchelder, PhD, MPH
    Funding Source: National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA)
    Project Number: K23DA043418

    Description: Internalized stigma and related emotions, such as shame, are under-addressed modifiable barriers to engagement in HIV care across the cascade, which theory indicates may mechanistically occur via avoidance coping behaviors, including substance use. As stigma-related emotions are notoriously under-reported, improved measurement and assessment of these pathways are needed to more strategically intervene on these barriers to HIV care. This K23 aims to elucidate underlying behavioral and social mechanisms associated with substance use and to optimize treatment success among MSM sub-optimally engaged in HIV care. This work involves three aims. 1) The assessment of the interrelationships between HIV care cascade indicators (i.e., linkage and engagement in care), substance use, and stigma-related emotions, informed by three measurements (recently validated nonverbal behavioral coding, narrative coding, and self-report).

    This study will also assess whether avoidant coping mediates these relationships. 2) Focus groups with this target population in order to obtain feedback to be integrated with the results from the secondary data analysis to inform the refinement of a previously developed emotion regulation intervention (PI Batchelder: supported by UCSF’s Center for AIDS Prevention Studies Innovative Early Investigator Award) designed to improve engagement in HIV-care among substance using HIV+ MSM sub-optimally engaged in care. 3) A pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the refined intervention with substance using HIV+ MSM sub-optimally engaged in HIV care. Outcome data from this pilot will be used to assess the clinical utility for improving engagement in HIV care and reducing substance use.


  • Intersecting stigmatized identities and engagement in HIV treatment (INSIGHT) study

    Principal Investigator: Abigail Batchelder, PhD, MPH
    Funding Source: Harvard Center for AIDS Research NIH/NIAID 5P30AI060354-13

    Description: Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV in the US and in Massachusetts; they also have higher rates of distress and substance use compared to heterosexual men. Further, the sexual minority stress theory posits that stigma accounts for higher rates of psychological distress and substance use. Emerging evidence indicates that when stigma is internalized, it can be experienced as chronic trauma. The well-supported Stress and Coping Theory suggests that the relationship between internalized stigma and poor engagement in HIV care may be due to avoidant coping, a common outcome of trauma. Internalized stigma is associated with poor engagement in care, including nonadherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART), which may be intensified by, the co-occurrence of intersecting internalized stigmas. However, the mechanisms by which intersecting internalized stigmas (e.g., being MSM, HIV+, or a substance user) lead to worse HIV outcomes are neither well understood nor addressed with existing interventions. Leveraging recent findings on the intersectionality of identities and related-chronic trauma, this study will expand on my previous work by providing critical data to adapt a promising intervention that I originally designed to address substance use and HIV-related shame and associated thoughts (e.g., internalized HIV and substance use-stigma), as barriers to engagement in HIV care. The intervention incorporates components of evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with an innovative bidirectional text message platform to enhance emotional self-regulation in order to improve engagement in HIV care among HIV+ substance users.

    Aim 1: Identify substance using HIV+ MSM’s perceptions of the link between sub-optimal engagement in HIV treatment and intersecting internalized stigmas, including the role of avoidance (n=30, or until saturation).
    Aim 2: Use structural equation modeling (SEM) to assess how engagement in HIV care, using a cascade index score, relates to intersecting internalized stigmas (HIV, substance use, and homonegativity; n=207).
    a. Evaluate if this relationship is mediated by avoidance coping using SEM.


  • Depression, anxiety and opioid adherence in adults with cancer pain

    Principal Investigator: Lara Traeger, PhD
    Funding Source: American Cancer Society
    Project Number: ACS MRSG PCSM 1410701

    Description: The goal of this study is to examine and address associations of depression, anxiety and adherence to long-acting opioids among adults with chronic cancer-related pain. Study procedures currently are integrated into ambulatory care at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. In Project 1 (a prospective observational study), we will examine the extent to which depression and anxiety symptoms are associated with poorer opioid adherence and worse pain outcomes. In Project 2 (an open pilot trial), we will use our results to develop and test a structured intervention to help patients adhere to their opioid regimens while reducing depression and anxiety symptoms. This work has the potential to increase the benefits of guideline-based treatments for chronic cancer pain and to optimize quality of life for patients at high risk for crisis-oriented pain care.

    Potential Participants: If you are interested in participating in this research, please contact the study coordinator at csrapoport1@mgh.harvard.edu.


  • Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Behavioral and Social Sciences Core

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD, Associate Director

    Description: In his role as Associate Director of the Harvard University CFAR Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS) Core, Dr. O’Cleirigh provides consultation on developing and supporting HIV-related clinical research. The Core provides services to behavioral and biomedical researchers; will leverage ongoing biomedical projects to integrate behavioral/social science and conduct add-on behavioral/social science studies; and will engages community stakeholders to increase buy-in of research and acceptance of new biomedical technologies.


  • Optimizing PrEP adherence for young men who have sex with men

    Principal Investigator: Douglas Krakower, MD
    Funding Source: Center for AIDS Research
    Project Number: NCT03493555

    Description: New HIV infections occur at a disproportionately high rate among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce HIV acquisition among MSM over 90% when adherence levels are high, and increasing the effective use of PrEP among YMSM is one of the highest priorities in HIV prevention. However, YMSM face multiple barriers to initiating and adhering to PrEP, including structural barriers (e.g. housing insecurity), psychosocial factors (e.g. substance use, depression), underestimation of their risk for acquiring HIV, and ambivalence about using PrEP due to medical mistrust. In an open-label study of PrEP use by 200 YMSM, only one-third of participants had protective levels of drug in their blood at 1 year despite intensive adherence counseling, and HIV incidence was high at 3% per year. When PrEP is prescribed to YMSM in care settings, where adherence support is less intensive than in clinical studies, adherence levels, and thus effectiveness, are likely to be even lower. Without strategies to optimize adherence to PrEP for these youth, PrEP is unlikely to have a major impact on HIV incidence for YMSM.

    One approach to overcoming the multi-factorial barriers that prevent YMSM from adhering to PrEP is the use of peer health system navigators. Navigators are healthcare workers who are trained to support adherence and retention in care for individuals who are at risk for suboptimal adherence. For YMSM who use PrEP, peer navigators could support adherence by connecting youth with resources to address their unmet structural and psychosocial needs and by helping them to negotiate the complexities of healthcare systems. As navigators have been used for over a decade to improve adherence in HIV-infected persons, and an evaluation showed that HIV-infected persons who used navigators had higher rates of virologic suppression, it is important to test whether peer navigation can optimize adherence to PrEP for YMSM.
    Our long-term goal is to optimize adherence to PrEP for YMSM and thus decrease HIV incidence. The objective of this study, the first step towards our goal, is to develop and pilot test a peer navigator program to optimize adherence to PrEP for YMSM.

    This project is being conducted at the Sidney Borum Jr. Health Center in Boston, MA.


  • Development of a trauma-informed intervention to for adaptive engagement in care among MSM with HIV

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: The Fenway Institute

    Description: Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) experience significant mental health disparities particularly, distress, trauma, depression and substance use compared to heterosexual men. Rates of PTSD and substance use are twice among gay and bisexual men and other MSM compared to heterosexual men. The relative high frequency of mental health problems among MSM may be even higher among MSM living with HIV/AIDS. For example, in a sample of over 500 gay and bisexual men living with HIV in primary care, 47% met diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder (inclusive of PTSD). These problems are not only distressing and interfering in and of themselves, but also are associated with health concerns such as higher risk of HIV or STI acquisition and, for MSM living with HIV/AIDS, suboptimal engagement in HIV and STI treatment uptake and care. Accordingly, no matter what new biomedical or behavioral HIV prevention or treatment tools emerge as we approach 2020, those at highest risk for HIV acquisition or worse HIV treatment outcome are likely to be those affected by comorbid mental health problems. 

    The purpose of this study is to:
    1. Test the feasibility and acceptability of a psychosocial intervention to improve engagement in HIV care, HIV medication adherence among MSM living with HIV with trauma histories. The intervention integrates most current empirically supported cognitive-behavioral approaches to support engagement in HIV care (i.e., LifeSteps) with cognitive-processing therapy, an empirically validated, cognitive-behavioral intervention for reducing posttraumatic stress.
    2. Examine, in a pilot randomized controlled trial, the impact of the proposed intervention for MSM with trauma history on improvement in engagement in HIV care, adherence to HIV treatment, (primary outcomes) and reductions of sexual transmission risk taking behaviors (secondary outcome).
    3. Explore whether intervention related changes in trauma-specific distress, will mediate intervention related changes in increases in engagement in care and ART adherence.

    This project is being conducted at Fenway Health in Boston, MA and Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada.

    Potential Participants: If you are interested in participating, please call 617-927-6465 (Boston site) or 416-979-5000 (Toronto site)


  • Promoting resiliency among parent of children with learning and attention disabilities (LD)

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH
    Funding Source: The Marino Foundation
    Project Number: N/A

    Description: According to the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health, 14.6 million children in the U.S. have special health care needs (e.g., learning disability, ADD/ADHD, developmental delays, chronic mental or physical health conditions), and learning disabilities (LD) are the largest category of students receiving special education services. Having a child with LD is associated with an increased risk of problems with emotional and physical health and social well-being. Resiliency is a multidimensional construct that refers to the ability to maintain adaptation and effective functioning when faced with stressors. Resiliency provides a framework for understanding the adjustment to stress as a dynamic process. We will personalize and target the Stress Management and Resiliency Training- Relaxation Response Resiliency Program (SMART 3RP) to parents of children with LD. We will determine the feasibility, and acceptability, and efficacy of an 8-week group 3RP intervention to parents of children with special health care needs. Lastly, we will pilot test the end-of-treatment effects of the SMART 3RP on parents’ stress levels using health-relevant biomarker measures.

    Potential participants: We are recruiting parents, nationally, of children any age with learning or attention disabilities. For more information, please email ParentalStressStudy@partners.org, or contact Emma Chad-Friedman at 617-643-6036.

    This program is for parents and is once a week, for 1 hour/ week for 8 consecutive weeks. Participation will be done virtually (via videoconferencing).  To participate in this study, we ask you to complete three questionnaires over the course of 6 months, as well as to provide two hair samples to measure cortisol levels.

    If interested in participating, please complete the pre-screen questionnaire. We will contact you soon to let you know about beginning the program.


  • Integrating tobacco treatment into cancer care

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH
    Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
    Project Number: 1K24 CA197381-01

    Description: The mentoring and research aims of this proposal involve expanding our knowledge of how to develop and deliver evidence-based tobacco treatment for diverse/variety of cancer patients.

    Potential participants: Mass General cancer patients who are smokers, English or Spanish-speaking, with regular telephone access.


  • Integrating tobacco treatment into cancer care: A comparative effectiveness trial

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH
    Funding source: National Cancer Institute
    Project number: R01 CA166147

    Description: A multi-site randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial will enroll 295 current smokers with suspected or newly diagnosed melanoma, lymphoma, thoracic, breast, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, head and neck, or gynecologic cancer. Participants will be randomly assigned to receive the Intensive Treatment (IT) or Standard Treatment (ST) condition. Both groups will receive an initial motivational counseling session and 3 weekly follow-up counseling sessions with a tobacco treatment counselor, conducted in-person or by telephone. The IT arm has the option to also receive an additional 4 biweekly and 3 monthly proactive counseling sessions and up to a 12-week supply of FDA-approved smoking cessation medication at no cost.

    Potential participants: Mass General patients who have smoked a cigarette, even a puff, within the last 30 days with newly diagnosed or suspected cancer, who are English or Spanish-speaking may be eligible. If you are interested in participating, please contact the study coordinator at 617-643-4765 or email smokefreesupportstudy@partners.org.


  • Integrating tobacco treatment into cancer care: Supplement to promote diversity in research

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH
    Co-PI: Giselle K. Perez-Lougee, PhD
    Funding Source: National Cancer Institute (NCI)
    Project Number: 3R01CA166147-03S1

    Description: Although there is a clear need for tobacco treatment among black and Hispanic smokers, little is known about their smoking behaviors and engagement in tobacco treatment following a cancer diagnosis and initiation of cancer care. Understanding the contribution of racial and ethnic factors on tobacco treatment during cancer care will help inform the development of tobacco programs that target the needs of this group. The proposed supplement aims to understand attitudes and barriers toward tobacco cessation treatment among black and Hispanic cancer patients.

    Potential participants: Mass General cancer patients who are racial/ethnic minorities, are current smokers, and are English or Spanish –speaking. Contact Emily Friedman (erfriedman@mgh.harvard.edu) or Julia Rabin (jtrabin@mgh.harvard.edu).


  • Implementing a virtual tobacco treatment in community oncology practices

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH; Jamie Ostroff, PhD
    Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
    Project Number: 1R01CA214427-01A1

    Description: The aim of this study is to conduct an effectiveness-implementation trial to assess virtual delivery of an evidence-based tobacco treatment intervention in cancer community sites affiliated with the newly established NCI community Oncology Research Program nationally.


  • Assessing the integration of tobacco cessation treatment into lung cancer screening

    Principal Investigator: Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH; Nancy A. Rigotti, MD; Jennifer S. Haas, MD, MSPH
    Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
    Project Number: R01CA218123

    Description: This project will address the integration of a virtual tobacco cessation treatment into lung cancer screening in a large integrated health care delivery system by integrating into its LDCT-LCS sites a novel, personalized, evidence-based smoking cessation intervention in English and Spanish.


  • Promoting stress management and resiliency among lymphoma survivors transitioning off treatment

    Principal Investigator: Giselle K. Perez-Lougee, PhD
    Funding Source: American Cancer Society (ACS)
    Project Number: ACS IRG 2016S000828

    Description: Lymphoma survivors are faced with a number of psychosocial and physical sequelae related to their cancer type and treatment that makes them susceptible to experiencing higher rates of distress compared to other survivor groups. This study proposes to develop and test a virtual group program to promote stress management and coping among lymphoma survivors transitioning off treatment.

    Potential participants: Mass General cancer patients who are within two years of having completed treatment for lymphoma. Contact Emily Friedman (efriedman@mgh.harvard.edu) or Katharine Quain (kquain@mgh.harvard.edu).


  • Exploring oncology providers’ attitudes toward cancer clinical trials

    Principal Investigator: Giselle K. Perez-Lougee, PhD
    Funding Source: Lazarex-Mass General Cancer Care Equity Program
    Project Number: NA

    Description: Cancer clinical trials represent the “gold standard” of comparing and testing the safety and effectiveness of novel therapies for the treatment of cancer. Adequate participation of eligible populations is critical to ensuring the accuracy and generalizability of trial findings across diverse groups; however, trial enrollment rates remain suboptimal. The proposed study intends to expand this body of research by using mixed methods strategies to describe oncology providers’ perspectives of enrolling eligible patients into cancer clinical trials. Specifically, we aim to describe their attitudes, experiences, and barriers with recommending and enrolling patients into cancer clinical trials, purposely attending to concerns related to the enrollment of minority and underserved groups. In addition, this study aims to identify strategies to improve trial accrual rates. Findings will help guide the development of an educational intervention for cancer care providers to improve clinical trial enrollment among vulnerable and underserved populations.

    Potential participants: Oncology providers across Boston. Please contact Katharine Quain (kquain@mgh.harvard.edu) for more information.


  • Striving towards empowerment and medication adherence (STEP-AD)

    Principal Investigator: Sannisha K. Dale, PhD, EdM
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    Project Number: 1K23MH108439-02

    Description: Among women in the U.S, Black women are the most impacted by HIV. Relevant psychosocial and contextual factors facing Black women with HIV include having a history of abuse, posttraumatic stress, racial discrimination, HIV-related stigma/discrimination, and prescribed female traditional gender roles; each of which are associated with worse HIV outcomes. Despite the need, there is currently no evidenced-based psychosocial intervention for Black women with HIV that addresses these contextual factors. The purpose of the current study is to develop and assess the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention for Black women with HIV that combines evidence-based strategies for trauma symptom reduction, strategies for coping with racial and HIV-related discrimination, gender empowerment, problem solving techniques for medication adherence, and other resilient coping techniques.

    Specific aims:
    1. Develop an intervention and conduct an open pilot trial of the intervention to initially assess feasibility of all study procedures and intervention delivery and acceptability
    2. Conduct a small randomized control trial (RCT) comparing the newly developed intervention to an enhanced treatment as usual control
    3. Prepare for conducting a large community based hybrid efficacy/effectiveness randomized control trial in community clinics through engagement with community members and potential deliverers of the intervention


  • Promoting resiliency among parent of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

    Principal Investigator: Karen Kuhlthau, PhD (Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH, Co-Investigator)
    Funding Source: HRSA
    Project Number: N/A

    Description: In addition to running the SMART-3RP with parents of LD, we are developing an adapted program for parents of children with ASD. To learn more about the experience of raising a child with ASD, we are running focus group interviews with parents of ASD. These interviews will inform an 8-week virtual-delivery program for parents of ASD.

    Potential participants: We are recruiting parents, nationally, of children any age with Autism Spectrum Disorder to take part in a 1 hour-long interview to help us learn more about parenting a child with ASD.

    Contact information: For more information, please email ParentalStressStudy@partners.org, or contact Emma Chad-Friedman at 617-643-6036.


  • Promoting adherence to endocrine therapy for breast cancer survivors

    Principal Investigator: Jamie Jacobs, PhD
    Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
    Project Number: 5K07CA211107-02

    Description: The majority of breast cancer is hormone sensitive and treated with 10 years of adjuvant endocrine therapy (e.g., tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors) to reduce the risk of recurrence and improve survival; however, adherence to these medications among breast cancer survivors is overwhelmingly poor, with half of women being non-adherent within five years. Furthermore, breast cancer survivors with high psychological distress (e.g., related to side effects) are less likely to be adherent to this preventative treatment. There is an absence of efficacious interventions to improve endocrine therapy adherence, help survivors manage symptoms, and reduce distress. To address this gap, this study employs a mixed-methods design to develop and test a stepped-care, telehealth intervention to improve adherence to endocrine therapy and reduce distress in breast cancer survivors at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and three community affiliates. Step 1 is a 3-session, Brief Adherence Intervention for BCS with poor adherence; Step 2 is an adapted 8-session Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for BCS with poor adherence and high distress. Phase 1 includes (1) intervention development with psychologists and oncology clinicians and semi-structured interviews with breast cancer survivors, and (2) a pilot study to evaluate acceptability and refine the intervention. Phase 2 will entail a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of comparing the stepped-care, telehealth intervention to a medication monitoring control on adherence outcomes over eight months.

    Potential participants: We are currently recruiting female breast cancer survivors who have completed active treatment (e.g., surgery, chemotherapy, radiation) for early-stage, ER+/PR+ breast cancer and are currently taking endocrine therapy (e.g., Tamoxifen, Arimidex, Aromasin, Femara, Faslodex, Zoladex). Participants will complete a 20-30 minute phone interview with research staff.

    For more information, please contact: Emily Walsh, 617-724-1414


  • Evaluating recovery coaches to improve treatment outcomes & reduce health care costs among patients

    Principal Investigator: Jessica Magidson, PhD and Sarah Wakeman, MD
    Funding Source: Partners Population Health Management
    Project Number: N/A

    Description: This grant aims to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of integrating peer recovery coaches into primary care for outpatient management of substance use disorders, examining whether recovery coach involvement can improve substance use treatment outcomes and reduce health care costs among patients with substance use disorders.


  • Striving towards empowerment and medication adherence (STEP-AD)

    Principal Investigator: Sannisha K. Dale, PhD, EdM
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    Project Number: 1K23MH108439-02

    Description: Among women in the U.S, Black women are the most impacted by HIV. Relevant psychosocial and contextual factors facing Black women with HIV include having a history of abuse, posttraumatic stress, racial discrimination, HIV-related stigma/discrimination, and prescribed female traditional gender roles; each of which are associated with worse HIV outcomes. Despite the need, there is currently no evidenced-based psychosocial intervention for Black women with HIV that addresses these contextual factors. The purpose of the current study is to develop and assess the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention for Black women with HIV that combines evidence-based strategies for trauma symptom reduction, strategies for coping with racial and HIV-related discrimination, gender empowerment, problem solving techniques for medication adherence, and other resilient coping techniques.

    Specific aims:

    1. Develop an intervention and conduct an open pilot trial of the intervention to initially assess feasibility of all study procedures and intervention delivery and acceptability
    2. Conduct a small randomized control trial (RCT) comparing the newly developed intervention to an enhanced treatment as usual control
    3. Prepare for conducting a large community based hybrid efficacy/effectiveness randomized control trial in community clinics through engagement with community members and potential deliverers of the intervention


  • Integrated behavioral treatment for chronic pain/drug use in older MSM with HIV

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R21 DA038197

    Description: Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US are most heavily affected by HIV, representing ~63% of all new HIV infections annually. With highly effective HIV medication and consistent engagement in HIV health care, these MSM are living longer; by 2015 it is estimated that more than 50% of Americans living with HIV will be 50 years of age or older. Evidence is emerging that chronic pain is prevalent in older HIV-infected patients and likely occurs synergistically with substance use and abuse, which predispose to non-engagement and non-retention in HIV care, non-adherence to HIV medications and sexual risk taking. Understanding these relationships and incorporating pain management strategies in health interventions will forge the development of a tailored behavioral-based, integrated intervention that has the potential to improve pain management, reduce substance use (and/or its interference in HIV disease management) and improve ART adherence and engagement in care Design. The purpose of this research application is to develop and openly pilot an integrative intervention for older HIV- infected MSM)who report chronic pain and substance-using behaviors that interfere with engagement in care and sexual risk taking. The application has the potential to change the manner in which older HIV infected MSM with chronic pain and substance abuse are treated, thus increasing quality of life and longevity in this population.


  • Integrated behavioral treatment for chronic pain/drug use in older MSM with HIV (Phase 2)

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R21 DA038197

    Description: Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US are most heavily affected by HIV, representing ~63% of all new HIV infections annually. With highly effective HIV medication and consistent engagement in HIV health care, these MSM are living longer; by 2015 it is estimated that more than 50% of Americans living with HIV will be 50 years of age or older. Evidence is emerging that chronic pain is prevalent in older HIV-infected patients and likely occurs synergistically with substance use and abuse, which predispose to non-engagement and non-retention in HIV care, non-adherence to HIV medications and sexual risk taking. Understanding these relationships and incorporating pain management strategies in health interventions will forge the development of a tailored behavioral-based, integrated intervention that has the potential to improve pain management, reduce substance use (and/or its interference in HIV disease management) and improve ART adherence and engagement in care Design. The purpose of this research application is to develop and openly pilot an integrative intervention for older HIV- infected men who have sex with men (MSM) who report chronic pain and substance-using behaviors that interfere with engagement in care and sexual risk taking. The application has the potential to change the manner in which older HIV infected MSM with chronic pain and substance abuse are treated, thus increasing quality of life and longevity in this population.

    Potential Participants: If you are interested in participating in this research, please contact the study coordinator at 617-927-6465.


International Research

  • TENDAI Study: Task shifting to treat depression & HIV medication nonadherence


    Principal Investigator:
    Conall O’Cleirigh, PHD; Melanie Abas, MD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R01 MH1147018

    Description: Zimbabwe has the 5th highest prevalence of HIV globally, and depression has been identified as a major hurdle to people living with HIV (PLWH) adhering to their antiretroviral medication in this setting. Unfortunately, due to the dearth of mental health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa, there is a significant depression treatment gap. This project is a two-arm randomized effectiveness trial (n=290) evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a brief, stepped-care intervention for depression and ART adherence (TENDAI), in compared with an enhanced standard care condition, in patients living with HIV in rural Zimbabwe. To counter the mental health treatment gap, this study prioritizes task-shifting using adherence counselors and nurses as interventionists, and the stepped-care approach utilizes three successive intensity levels of depression treatment for non-responders to maximize efficient use of resources in resource limited settings. Outcomes for the project include viral suppression, medication adherence, and depression.

    Potential Participants: This study will be recruiting HIV-positive adults with clinically significant depression symptoms and an uncontrolled viral load in Mashonoland East Province, Zimbabwe.


  • Nurse-delivered CBT for depression-adherence in HIV primary care in South Africa

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD; Steven Safren, PhD, ABPP
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R01 MH103770

    Description: This is a proposal to conduct a two-arm randomized effectiveness trial investigating whether a task shifting/sharing model of treating depression and improving adherence to ART in patients who fail first line antiretroviral therapy (ART) can occur using nurses in South Africa trained in CBT. South Africa is the country with the highest number of HIV infections in the world and the highest number of HIV/AIDS-related deaths, and where access to third line ART treatment is not currently available in the public healthcare system. Clinical depression, like elsewhere, is one of the highest comorbidities to HIV/AIDS, with estimated rates up to 34.9 percent. Depression, in the context of HIV, leads to poor self-care behavior such as non-adherence to ART and worse retention in care, which are critical for treatment success. The U.S. based investigators have developed and successfully tested an approach integrating adherence counseling into cognitive- behavioral therapy for depression in HIV. The South Africa based team, in collaboration with the U.S. based team, has conducted preliminary work to evaluate the cultural appropriateness and feasibility of integrating this approach into the South African HIV treatment setting.

    Accordingly, we have

    1. Conducted an open-pilot of the treatment in Cape Town with 6 HIV-infected patients with depression using a clinical psychology PhD student as the therapist
    2. Conducted formative qualitative research on the manifestation of depression and ways to adapt this approach for the South Africa HIV care setting
    3. Successfully trained two clinic nurses in the adapted version of the intervention
    4. Completed an open pilot feasibility trial with 14 patients with these nurses as interventionists

    Potential Participants: This study will be recruiting HIV-positive adults with a current diagnosis of depression and an uncontrolled viral load in South Africa.


  • Falling off the HIV treatment cascade cliff: Understanding postpartum attrition to HIV care

    Principal Investigator: Christina Psaros, PhD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R01 MH112385

    Description: The province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, has the highest prevalence of HIV among pregnant women in the world: 40% of women enrolled in antenatal care are living with HIV.  Pregnancy is an important time to engage women in HIV care to eliminate perinatal transmission through prevention of mother to child transmission programming (PMTCT), but it also presents an opportunity to engage women in lifelong HIV care.  Many women leave HIV care during the postpartum period, even though ongoing care is imperative to maintaining their health and the health of their infants.  The research community does not know enough about why women leave HIV care during the postpartum period, thus we cannot yet design interventions to retain more women in HIV care.  The goal of this study is to better understand barriers to and facilitators of remaining in HIV care after having a baby in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, with the ultimate goal of developing interventions to best support the health of women living with HIV and their children.


  • Fostering resilience to psychosocial and HIV risk in Indian men who have sex with men (MSM)

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD; Steven A. Safren, PhD; Matthew Mimiaga, ScD
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    Project Number: R01 MH100627

    Description: The goal of this multi-site randomized controlled trial is to examine the efficacy of an intervention to reduce HIV and STI risk among MSM in India. This 2-arm RCT compares a self-acceptance based HIV risk reduction intervention with voluntary HIV/STI counseling and testing (VCT) to VCT among MSM in Chennai and Mumbai, India.

    Potential participants: Recruitment took place at two sites in India from 2015 to July 2018.


  • Development of a trauma-informed ntervention to support adaptive engagement in care among MSM

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: The Fenway Institute
    Description: Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) experience significant mental health disparities particularly, distress, trauma, depression and substance use compared to heterosexual men. Rates of PTSD and substance use are twice among gay and bisexual men and other MSM compared to heterosexual men. The relative high frequency of mental health problems among MSM may be even higher among MSM living with HIV/AIDS.  For example, in a sample of over 500 gay and bisexual men living with HIV in primary care, 47% met diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder (inclusive of PTSD). These problems are not only distressing and interfering in and of themselves, but also are associated with health concerns such as higher risk of HIV or STI acquisition and, for MSM living with HIV/AIDS, suboptimal engagement in HIV and STI treatment uptake and care.  Accordingly, no matter what new biomedical or behavioral HIV prevention or treatment tools emerge as we approach 2020, those at highest risk for HIV acquisition or worse HIV treatment outcome are likely to be those affected by comorbid mental health problems.

    The purpose of this study is to:
    1. Test the feasibility and acceptability of a psychosocial intervention to improve engagement in HIV care, HIV medication adherence among MSM living with HIV with trauma histories. The intervention integrates most current empirically supported cognitive-behavioral approaches to support engagement in HIV care (i.e., LifeSteps) with cognitive-processing therapy, an empirically validated, cognitive-behavioral intervention for reducing posttraumatic stress.
    2. Examine, in a pilot randomized controlled trial, the impact of the proposed intervention for MSM with trauma history on improvement in engagement in HIV care, adherence to HIV treatment, (primary outcomes) and reductions of sexual transmission risk taking behaviors (secondary outcome).
    3. Explore whether intervention related changes in trauma-specific distress, will mediate intervention related changes in increases in engagement in care and ART adherence.
    This project is being conducted at Fenway Health in Boston, MA and Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada.

    Potential Participants: If you are interested in participating, please call 617-927-6465 (Boston site) or 416-979-5000 (Toronto site)


  • Hybrid effectiveness-implementation trial for ART adherence & substance use in HIV care in S. Africa

    Principal investigator: Jessica Magidson, PhD
    Funding Source: NIDA
    Project Number: K23 DA041901

    Description: The HIV epidemic in South Africa is among the highest in the world. South Africa has a large antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, but some individuals exhibit poor ART adherence, which increases the likelihood of developing drug resistance and failing the only available first and second line ART regimens in this setting. Unfortunately, ART nonadherence contributes to greater morbidity, mortality, and higher likelihood of sexual HIV transmission when the virus is detectable. At the same time, alcohol and other drug use is prevalent among HIV-infected individuals in South Africa and is associated with worse ART adherence, lower rates of viral suppression, and HIV risk behavior. Yet, despite the impact of untreated substance use on poor HIV treatment outcomes and continued HIV transmission, there is little if any integration of substance use and HIV care services in South Africa, which creates a fragmented and incomplete system of care. The current study had three phases, the first phase being formative, qualitative work which led to a systematic adaptation phase (Phase II). This study is currently in its third phase, the clinical trial, based on the formative work from the first phase and other empirical support using behavioral interventions to improve ART adherence and reduce substance use in resource-limited settings, including South Africa. The study is a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness-implementation trial of a lay counselor-delivered behavioral intervention for adherence and substance use integrated into the HIV primary care setting in South Africa. To ensure that those who need this intervention most will receive it, participants will be patients living with HIV who are struggling with adherence and who have an elevated substance use risk.

    Potential participants: Recruitment taking place in Cape Town, South Africa.


Completed Projects

Domestic Projects

  • Integrated Treatment for Smoking Cessation & Anxiety in People with HIV

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA)
    Project Number: R34 DA031038

    Description: This trial provided important information regarding the potential efficacy and mechanisms of an integrated intervention for and at risk group of HIV+ smokers, namely those who also have clinically significant anxiety problems (>60% of HIV+ smokers). Identifying efficacious treatments for smoking cessation for HIV+ adults has considerable public health significance because cigarette smoking is the leading cause of death and disability in the United States (U.S.), contributing to over 440,000 deaths each year, and HIV+ smokers comprise an overrepresented group among smokers. This study yielded important information in the treatment of drug use and anxiety symptoms in HIV+ individuals, including how best to treat this vulnerable population. Moreover, this study guided advances in the theoretical conceptualization of the mechanisms involved in HIV-anxiety- smoking relations.


  • Integrated behavioral treatment for chronic pain/drug use in older MSM with HIV

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R21 DA038197

    Description: Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US are most heavily affected by HIV, representing ~63% of all new HIV infections annually. With highly effective HIV medication and consistent engagement in HIV health care, these MSM are living longer; by 2015 it is estimated that more than 50% of Americans living with HIV will be 50 years of age or older. Evidence is emerging that chronic pain is prevalent in older HIV-infected patients and likely occurs synergistically with substance use and abuse, which predispose to non-engagement and non-retention in HIV care, non-adherence to HIV medications and sexual risk taking. Understanding these relationships and incorporating pain management strategies in health interventions will forge the development of a tailored behavioral-based, integrated intervention that has the potential to improve pain management, reduce substance use (and/or its interference in HIV disease management) and improve ART adherence and engagement in care Design. The purpose of this research application is to develop and openly pilot an integrative intervention for older HIV- infected MSM)who report chronic pain and substance-using behaviors that interfere with engagement in care and sexual risk taking. The application has the potential to change the manner in which older HIV infected MSM with chronic pain and substance abuse are treated, thus increasing quality of life and longevity in this population.


  • HIV Prevention and Trauma Treatment for MSM with Childhood Sexual Abuse Histories (THRIVE)

    Principal Investigator: Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD
    Funding Source: NIH
    Project Number: R01 MH095624

    The prevalence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) is estimated at an alarming 19% domestically, rates comparable to endemic settings in certain regions of sub-Saharan Africa where approximately 20% of the adult population is HIV infected. Studies have also demonstrated a staggeringly high prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in MSM, and shown an association between CSA and HIV risk in MSM. A successful intervention for MSM with a CSA history to prevent HIV has the potential to avert infections among some of the riskiest members of the most HIV vulnerable group in the U.S. Notwithstanding the ability of the existing HIV prevention interventions to show reductions in sexual risk taking, the recent successes of chemoprophylaxis, current policy initiatives, and empirically supported recommendations, all support development of combination prevention interventions that can specify multiple prevention targets, address related risk factors and barriers, and are grounded in a community context. The pathways from CSA to adult sexual risk behavior are varied and complex and this complexity is appropriately addressed in individual-based interventions where empirically supported interventions for CSA related trauma were efficacy tested. The development of an integrated prevention intervention that utilizes cognitive behavioral technologies to address co-occurring and interfering CSA and sexual risk represents a novel and largely untested innovative application that is theoretically designed to address sexual risk directly and indirectly through reductions in CSA-related trauma symptoms. The flexibility of integrated and combination prevention programs has the potential to support triage of MSM with risk profiles to the programs that best meet their prevention needs.

    This two-arm RCT is designed to test the efficacy of a psycho-social intervention that addresses intersecting epidemics among MSM, HIV and CSA. The experimental condition integrates sexual risk reduction counseling with Cognitive Processing Therapy for Trauma and Self Care (CPT-TSC). CPT-TSC has been specifically piloted on MSM with CSA histories and sexual risk to reduce interfering negative CSA-related thoughts about self, to more accurately appraise sexual risk, and to decrease avoidance of sexual safety considerations through rehearsals of sexual safety behaviors. The active and time-matched comparison condition is risk reduction counseling plus supportive psychotherapy. The primary outcome will be self-reported sexual risk taking as assessed via a computer-based questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include trauma symptom severity, both cognitive and behavioral.

    Project THRIVE was conducted at Fenway Health in Boston, MA and the University of Miami in Miami, FL.


  • Compensatory Executive Functioning Skills Training in Adolescents with ADHD

    Principal Investigator: Steven Safren, PhD, ABPP
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

    Description: This is a 3-year study to investigate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral intervention for adolescents with ADHD who are stabilized on medications but still show clinically significant residual symptoms. Self-report, parent-report, teacher report, and independent assessor (who will be blind to treatment condition) data will be used as outcomes.


  • Identifying critical elements of discussions between providers, patients & families at end of life

    Principal Investigator: Lara Traeger, PhD
    Funding Source: American Cancer Society

    Description: The goal of this study is to examine the nature and characteristics of discussions between palliative care providers and patients/families with metastatic cancer during key transitions in end-of-life care.

  • Evaluating recovery coaches to improve treatment outcomes & reduce health care costs among patients

    Principal Investigator: Jessica Magidson, PhD and Sarah Wakeman, MD
    Funding Source: Partners Population Health Management
    Project Number: N/A

    Description: This grant aims to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of integrating peer recovery coaches into primary care for outpatient management of substance use disorders, examining whether recovery coach involvement can improve substance use treatment outcomes and reduce health care costs among patients with substance use disorders.

International Projects

  • Fifteen Years of Epidemic HIV: Novel Risk Behavior in South African Teens in 2010

    Principal Investigator: Christina Psaros, PhD
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

    Description: Rates of HIV infection among young women in South Africa are among the highest in the world. Adolescent women in South Africa represent part of the "second generation" of HIV affected youth, a cohort that remains understudied. Adolescent women coming of age today likely have different experiences related to HIV than the generation before; we explored how the experiences of these women may impact current HIV risk behavior to learn how to best intervene in order to reduce rates of HIV in the future.


  • Perinatal depression, stigma, social capital utilization and PMTCT adherence

    Principal Investigator: Christina Psaros, PhD
    Funding Source: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    Project Number: 1K23MH096651

    Description: The United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) illustrate key areas in which the lives of women and children worldwide are in need, including improving maternal health and a reduction in childhood mortality. The success of meeting both these goals depends on reducing rates of vertical transmission of HIV. Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the areas targeted by the MDGs and bears a substantial degree of HIV disease burden, with well over 22 million people living with HIV at the end of 2008, a significant number of whom are women of reproductive age. Depression has been associated with non-adherence to the series of health behaviors known as preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. Women in resource limited settings are likely to face additional barriers to PMTCT adherence, including stigma and structural barriers. While structural barriers may be circumvented by relying on community resources (known as social capital), depression and stigma may make it difficult to access these resources. Thus, understanding the role of modifiable factors that contribute to PMTCT adherence is critical to meeting the goals of the MDGs. The goals of the proposed project were to: (1) Investigate the relationships among perinatal depression, stigma, social capital utilization, PMTCT adherence, and (2) Test a pilot intervention to treat perinatal depression and improve adherence to ARVs among HIV infected women in a resource limited setting.

Recent Publications

Note: * indicates a current or former member of the Behavioral Medicine Program.

Conall O’Cleirigh, PhD

  1. O’Cleirigh C*, Zvolensky MJ, Smits JAJ, Labbe AK*, Coleman JN*, Wilner JG*, Stanton AM*, Gonzalez A, Garey L, Regenauer KS*, Rosenfield D. Integrated treatment for smoking cessation and anxiety and depressed mood in people living with HIV: A randomized controlled trial. JAIDS. In Press.
  2. O’Cleirigh C*, Pantalone D, Batchelder A*, Hatzenbuehler M, Marquez S*, Grasso G, Safren SA*, Mayer KH. Co-occurring psychosocial problems predict HIV status and increased health care costs and utilization among sexual minority men. Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2018 Feb 6:1-8.
  3. O’Cleirigh C*, Elsesser SA, King D, Ehlinger PP*, Bradford JB, Grasso C, Mayer KH. Characteristics and correlates of tobacco use in a community sample of sexual minority men and women: implications for smoking cessation program development. LGBT Health. 2018 Apr 1;5(3):197-202.

Christina Psaros, PhD

  1. Looby SE, Psaros C*, Raggio G*, Rivard C, Smeaton L, Shifren J, Grinspoon S, Joffe H. Association between HIV status and psychological symptoms in perimenopausal women. Menopause. 2018;25(6):648-656. doi:10.1097/gme.0000000000001058.
  2. Psaros C*, Milford C, Smit JA, Greener L, Mosery N, Matthews LT, Harrison A, Gordon JR, Mimiaga M, Bangsberg DR, Safren SA*. HIV Prevention Among Young Women in South Africa: Understanding Multiple Layers of Risk. Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2017. doi:10.1007/s10508-017-1056-8.
  3. Taylor SW, Psaros C*, Pantalone DW, Tinsley J, Elsesser SA, Mayer KH, Safren SA*. “Life-Steps” for PrEP Adherence: Demonstration of a CBT-Based Intervention to Increase Adherence to Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Medication Among Sexual-Minority Men at High Risk for HIV Acquisition. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. 2017;24(1):38-49. doi:10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.02.004.

Abigail Batchelder, PhD, MPH

  1. Batchelder A*, Carrico A, Acree M, Hecht F, Moskowitz J. Positive and Negative Self-Conscious Emotion and Transmission Risk Following HIV Diagnosis. AIDS & Behavior.2017 Oct; 22(2):1496-1502.
  2. Batchelder AW*, Ehlinger PP*, Boroughs MS, Shipherd JC, Safren SA*, Ironson GH, O'Cleirigh C*. Psychological and behavioral moderators of the relationship between trauma severity and HIV transmission risk behavior among MSM with a history of childhood sexual abuse. .Journal of Behavioral Medicine.2017 Oct;40(5):794-802. PMID: 28396969
  3. Choi KW*, Batchelder AW*, Ehlinger P*, Safren S*, O’Cleirigh C*. Applying network analysis to psychological comorbidity and health behavior: depression, PTSD, and sexual risk in sexual minority men with trauma histories. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2017 Dec;85(12):1158-1170.

Jamie Jacobs, PhD

  1. ▪Greer JA*, ▪Jacobs JM*, El-Jawahri A, Nipp RD, Gallagher ER, Pirl WF, Park ER*, Muzikansky A, Jacobsen JC, Jackson VA, Temel JS. Role of patient coping strategies in understanding the effects of early palliative care on quality of life and mood. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2018 Jan;1(36):53-60. In press. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2017.73.7221. PubMed PMID:29140772.
          ▪=contributed equally as first authors
  2. Jacobs JM*, Pensak NA, Sporn NJ, MacDonald JJ, Lennes IT, Safren SA*, Pirl WF, Temel JS, Greer JA*. Treatment satisfaction and adherence to oral chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Journal of Oncology Practice. 2017 May;13(5)e474-e485.doi.org/10.1200/JOP.2016.019729. PubMed PMID: 28398843.
  3. Jacobs JM*, Shaffer KM, Nipp RD, Fishbein JN, MacDonald J, El-Jawahri A, Pirl WF, Jackson VA, Park ER, Temel JS, Greer JA*. Distress is interdependent in patients and caregivers with newly diagnosed incurable cancers. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2017 Aug;51(4):519-531. doi: 10.1007/s12160-017-9875-3. PubMed PMID: 28097515.

Elyse Park, PhD, MPH

  1. Park ER*, Kirchhoff AC, Nipp RD, Donelan K, Leisenring WM, Armstrong GT, Kuhlthau KA. Assessing health insurance coverage characteristics and impact on health care cost, worry, and access: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2017; 177(12):1855-1858.  PMID: 28973059
  2. Japuntich SJ, Kumar P, Pendergast J, Juarez G, Malin J, Wallace R, Chrischilles E, Keating NL, Park ER*. Smoking status and survival among a national cohort of lung and colorectal cancer patients. Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2018 Jan. In press. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nty012.
  3. Lennes I, Luberto C*, Carr A, Eusebio J, Park ER*. Project Reach: Piloting a risk-tailored smoking cessation intervention for lung screening. Journal of Health Psychology. 2018 Feb:1359105318756500. In press. doi: 10.1177/1359105318756500.

Daniel Hall, PhD

  1. Hall DL*, Luberto CM*, Philpotts LL, Song R, Park ER*, Yeh GY (In press). Mind-body interventions for fear of cancer recurrence: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Psycho-Oncology. doi: 10.1002/pon.4757
  2. Hall DL*, Lennes IT, Carr A, Eusebio JR, Yeh GY, Park ER* (2018). Lung cancer screening uncertainty among patients undergoing LDCT. American Journal of Health Behavior, 42(1), 69-76. doi:10.5993/AJHB.42.1.7
  3. Hall DL*, Lennes IT, Pirl WF, Friedman ER, Park ER*. (2017). Fear of recurrence or progression as a link between somatic symptoms and perceived stress among cancer survivors. Journal of Supportive Care in Cancer, 25(5), 1401-1407. doi: 10.1007/s00520-016-3533-3.

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