Improving the understanding and diagnosis of disease by imaging the human body in vivo

Until recently, visualizing the architectural and cellular morphology of human tissue has required histopathological examination.

Samples would be excised from the patient, processed, sectioned, stained and viewed under a microscope.

In addition to being invasive, time consuming and costly, the static nature of conventional pathology prohibits the study of biological dynamics and function.

The Tearney Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital leads the way in transforming the current diagnostic paradigm through the invention and translation of new noninvasive, high-resolution optical imaging modalities that enable disease diagnosis from living patients without excising tissues from the body.

Led by Guillermo (Gary) Tearney, MD, PhD, the lab’s large multidisciplinary team invents, validates and translates novel devices that use light to conduct microscopy in living patients. Light is uniquely well suited for non-invasively interrogating the microscopic structure, molecular composition and biomechanical properties of biological tissues.

The goal of the laboratory’s research is to improve understanding and diagnosis of disease by imaging the human body at the highest possible level of detail in vivo.


About the MGH Research Scholars Program

The MGH Research Scholars Program was established to support early career researchers with innovative yet unproven ideas that have the potential to transform the future of medicine. Funded 100% through philanthropy, this program gives researchers the freedom and flexibility they need to follow the science wherever it leads. Time and time again, history has shown that brilliant scientists who are given free rein to explore new frontiers are the ones who make the greatest, often wholly unexpected, advances.

Learn more about the MGH Research Scholars Program.

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