Mass General News

Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge

An MGH program increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent. The system used interactive voice response technology – automated telephone calls – to provide support and stop-smoking medication for three months after smokers left the hospital. Read more.

Image Credit: David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

News Releases

8/28/14: Circulating tumor cell clusters more likely to cause metastasis than single cells Circulating tumor cell clusters – clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream – appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the MGH Cancer Center.

8/26/14: Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression.

8/19/14: Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge An MGH program described in the August 20 issue of JAMA increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent.

8/19/14:Repeat ED visits for acute heart failure suggest need for better outpatient care Almost one-third of acute heart failure syndrome patients seen in hospital emergency departments in Florida and California during 2010 had ED visits during the following year, findings that suggest a lack of appropriate outpatient care.

8/18/14: Mass. General-developed device monitors key step in development of tumor metastases A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a fundamental change in cellular characteristics that has been associated with the ability of tumor cells to migrate and invade other sites.

8/13/14: Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death.

Newsletters & Publications

Hotline

Hotline Each week, MGH Hotline reports important news within the Massachusetts General Hospital community featuring employees and initiatives that focus on bettering the future of clinical care, research and training.

Proto

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Mass General Magazine Mass General Magazine takes you into the heart of the institution, describing ways in which Mass General is leading the way in educating physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals; in improving the health of local and distant communities; and in establishing best practices and health policy.

Media Coverage

08/29/2014: The 1918 Influenza Outbreak: When Boston Was Patient Zero WGBH News
quotes MGH physician David Hooper

08/29/2014: Prostate Cancer and Zoledronic Acid: Two Emerging Patterns Medscape News
quotes MGH Cancer Center investigator Philip Saylor

08/29/2014: Autism Risk with Prenatal Antidepressant Use Insignificant After Controlling for Major Maternal Depression Pharmacy Times
coverage of study led by MGH investigator Roy Perlis

08/28/2014: Will $94 million raised from Ice bucket challenge yield cure for ALS? Boston Globe
quotes MGH investigator James Berry

08/28/2014: Prenatal Antidepressant Use Doesn’t Increase Autism Risk, Study Says Boston Magazine
coverage of study led by MGH investigator Roy Perlis

08/28/2014: Stroke Rounds: APOE Tied to Warfarin Brain Bleeds MedPage Today
coverage of study led by MGH investigator Christopher Anderson

08/28/2014: Cheap, Low-Tech Devices Help Paralyzed Patients ‘Speak Their Minds’ CommonHealth/WBUR.org
quotes MGH investigator Alik Widge