Blood Tests

Laboratory work has been done including a complete blood count (CBC) and blood culture. The CBC results are:

  • WBC (white blood cell, for fighting infections) ______
  • ANC (neutrophils, for fighting bacterial infections) ______
  • HCT (hematocrit, measure of red blood cells) ______
  • PLT (platelets, for clotting) ______

If the blood culture becomes positive, we will call you to return to the hospital. This could happen any time in the next 3 days.

Medicine at the Hospital

Your child has been given Levofloxacin IV. This is an antibiotic that fights against most of the bacterial infections your child might have developed while being on medications. It is especially helpful for children with central lines. The IV dose will work in your child’s blood stream for 12 to 24 hours.

Medicine at Home

Your doctor may have given you a prescription for Levofloxacin to be taken by mouth.

  • If your child is less than 5 years old, the antibiotic is taken two times per day.
  • If your child is 5 years or older, the antibiotic is taken one time per day.

The medicine will be continued until your doctor, nurse practitioner or nurse tells you to stop giving it.

The most common side effects are upset stomach and diarrhea. If your child vomits within 30 minutes of taking the medicine, give your child another dose. If your child continues to have trouble with vomiting the medicine, please call your doctor.

When to Call the Doctor

You must have daily contact with the Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Unit.

  • If it is the weekend, please call the on-call doctor at 617-726-2737.
  • If it is during the week, please call your child’s primary nurse at 617-726-2737. They will want to know how the fever is and how your child is feeling. They will also be checking the culture/s.

Call Your Doctor Right Away If Your Child Has Any of the Following:

  • Fever greater than 103 ls
  • Any color changes or shaking chil
  • Trouble breathing
  • Unable to keep down fluids or medicine
  • Diarrhea ed
  • If your child is acting sicker or you are worried
  • Any color changes or shaking chills
  • Unable to keep down fluids or medicines
  • If your child is acting sicker or you are worried

Rev. 6/2013. This document is intended to provide health related information so that you may be better informed. It is not a substitute for a doctor's medical advice and should not be relied upon for treatment for specific medical conditions.