Nima Saeidi, PhD

DR. Saeidi

Address: 51 Blossom St., Boston, MA
Phone: 617-726-3474
Fax: 617-573-9471
Contact by email

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING

  • BsC, Mechanical Engineering and Physics, Sharif University of Technology (Tehran)
  • MsC, Mechanical Engineering and Physics, Northeastern University, 2005
  • PhD, Bioengineering, Northeastern University, 2009

Research Thrusts

  • Assistant Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
  • Assistant in Bioengineering, Massachusetts General Hospital

BRIEF BIOGRAPHY

Nima Saeidi, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. He received his BSc in Mechanical Engineering and Physics from Sharif University of Technology (Tehran, Iran) in 2003, followed by MSc in Mechanical Engineering and PhD in Bioengineering from Northeastern University in 2005 and 2009, respectively.

Dr. Saeidi joined the Center for Engineering in Medicine in at Mass General and Harvard Medical School in 2010 as a postdoctoral fellow, and was promoted to Instructor in 2014.

His research has been published in the leading scientific journals including Science, Biomaterials, Nature Medicine and Tissues Engineering, and has been extensively featured in the National Institutes for Health (NIH) Director’s Blog, Nature News & Views, BBC, Boston Globe, among others. He is a recipient of National Institutes of Health (NIH) F32 and K01 awards.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

Dr. Saeidi’s research is primarily in the area of metabolism and obesity, where he is interested in understanding the mechanisms underlying regulation of energy homeostasis with strong emphasis towards identification of therapeutic targets and development of novel treatment for metabolic disorders.

A major focus of his efforts is aimed at developing and employing rodent models of bariatric surgery to delineate the mechanisms that mediate body weight loss and resolution of diabetes following these operations, and to use this unique platform to identify novel targets for the development of non-surgical treatments for obesity and diabetes. 

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