Vaccine How it can help you When to get the vaccine Risk and side effects
Pneumococcal vaccine
Also called Pneumovax®
  • Protects against pneumonia (an infection that causes fluid to build up in the lungs), meningitis (swelling or infection of the brain and spinal cord) and blood infections.
  • First dose: Between ages 18-20 (or as soon as possible if you are older than 20)
  • Second dose: 5 years after the first dose
  • Third dose: Age 50
  • Fourth dose: Age 65
  • Pain, swelling or redness where you had the vaccine
  • Fever
  • Headache or muscle aches
  • Feeling very tired
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine
Also called Gardasil®
Protects against human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • It is routinely given at age 11. It can be given as early as age 9 and up to 26 years of age.
  • Pain, swelling or redness where you had the vaccine
  • Fever
  • Headache or muscle aches
  • Feeling very tired
Influenza (flu) vaccine
  • Protects you from the flu, a common disease that causes cold-like symptoms, fever, vomiting ot diarrhea.
  • People with Down syndrome have a higher risk of developing infections. It is important that you or your son/daughter get the flu vaccine.
  • Once a year during flu season (fall and winter)
  • The flu virus (germ) changes every year. Doctors make new flu vaccines every year to protect people from the new flu virus.
  • Pain, swelling or redness where you had the vaccine.
  • Fever
  • Headache or muscle aches
  • Feeling very tired
  • Cold-like symptoms

 

Rev. 9/2017
This webpage is intended to provide health information so that you can be better informed. It is not a substitute for medical advice and should not be used to treatment of any medical conditions.
Created by Elaina Ramos, Boston University School of Medicine