Intro text similar to the Pediatric Locations page.



All Pediatric Imaging Exams

Where will the exam take place?

Click here to view pediatric imaging services by location.

Should I arrive early for my child’s appointment?

For most exams, please arrive at least 15 minutes early for the appointment to check in at the front desk. Specific instructions will be provided to you prior to your appointment.

What should I bring to my child’s exam?

As a caregiver, please remember to bring your identification and accompanying documents to confirm the child’s identity.

Dressing the child in loose clothing and bringing a change of clothes is recommended. Fleece jackets or comfort items (pacifier, blanket) are permitted.

Metal objects including jewelry, eyeglasses, hearing aids, non-permanent retainers and hairpins may affect exams. Be sure to remove them prior to your child's exam.

Will I get a call directly from a radiologist?

A radiologist may contact your ordering provider about the findings from the exam.

Can my child eat before the exam?

No eating or drinking is allowed in the waiting rooms at Mass General. If your child’s exam does not require fasting (?), please consume food and drink prior to your arrival. Specific eating and drinking instructions will be provided to you prior to the appointment.

What if my child is sick on the day of their exam?

If your child is showing signs of an illness, please reschedule the exam by calling 617-724-9729.

How do I get a copy of my child’s exam images and reports?

Reports are available electronically via PatientGateway. If your report does not appear in PaitentGateway, please contact your ordering provider. To order images, please click here.


X-ray

Can I stay in the room with my child?

For young children, caregivers may remain in the exam room. The technologist will direct you where to stand during the exam. Caregivers may be asked to assist the technologist during the X-ray to aid in the child’s comfort.

Who will interpret my child’s exam?

An X-ray Technologist will perform the exam. A Mass General Radiologist will read and interpret the child’s exam and report findings to the ordering provider.

How long will my child’s exam last?

The length of the exam depends on how many X-ray images need to be taken.

How much radiation is my child exposed to during an X-ray?

To learn more about X-ray radiation levels and safety, click here.


Ultrasound

Can I stay in the room with my child?

Yes, caregivers may remain in the room during the ultrasound exam.

What will my child experience before, during, and after the exam?

Ultrasound exams are painless and fast. The technician will apply warm gel to the area being scanned. A probe will be pressed against the skin and moved back and forth until the desired images are captured. Once the exam is complete, the gel will be wiped off your child's skin. After the exam, children should be able to resume their normal activities.

How long will my child’s ultrasound exam last?

Ultrasound exams typically last 30-45 minutes.


CT

Can I stay in the room with my child?

Caregivers must remain in the waiting rooms during a CT exam.

Will my child be sedated?

The need for sedation is dependent upon the age of the child and if they can remain still for the duration of the scan.

What is the purpose for having contrast, and will my child need it?

Contrast materials are dyes that temporarily discolor internal organs. They are substances that temporarily change the way x-rays or other imaging tools interact with the body to make specific organs or other body parts more prominent in images. Contrast materials can be given orally or intravenously (IV). Following an imaging exam with contrast material, the material is absorbed by the body or eliminated through urine or bowel movements.

For more information, click here.

How long will my child’s CT exam last?

An image takes only a few seconds to capture during a CT scan. The total duration of the exam depends on the number of images that need to be taken. A typical scan lasts about 15-30 minutes.

How much radiation is my child exposed to during a CT exam?

We customize CT scan for each patient based on weight, age, medical history and the body part being scanned. At our imaging facilities, the radiation dose for CT scans is typically 10% to 30% below the national average. Learn more about our commitment to reducing radiation exposure during radiology exams here.


MRI

What can my child expect during an MRI?

To learn what to expect during an MRI, click here.

Can I stay in the room with my child during an MRI?

Caregivers must remain in the waiting rooms during an MRI exam.

What is the purpose for having contrast during an MRI, and will my child need it?

Contrast materials are dyes that temporarily discolor internal organs. Contrast materials can be given orally or intravenously (IV). Following an imaging exam with contrast material, the material is absorbed by the body or eliminated through urine or bowel movements.

For more information, click here.

Does an MRI expose my child to radiation?

Unlike X-rays or CT exams, an MRI uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to take detailed images of organs and tissues. You can learn more about how to prepare and what to expect during an MRI here.

How long does an MRI last?

MRI exams can last anywhere from 30 minutes to 1 hour.


Fluoroscopy

What is a fluoroscopy scan?

A fluoroscopy scan is a real-time X-ray using a contrast material to produce images of the joint or internal organ. Fluoroscopy allows your doctor to view the area being scanned in motion rather than capturing still images like traditional X-rays. It is safe and non-invasive.

Can I stay in the room with my child?

For young children, caregivers may remain in the exam room. The technologist will direct you where to stand during the exam. Caregivers may be asked to assist the technologist during the fluoroscopy exam to aid in the child’s comfort.

What is the purpose for having contrast during a fluoroscopy exam, and will my child need it?

Contrast materials are dyes that temporarily discolor internal organs. They are substances that temporarily change the way x-rays or other imaging tools interact with the body to make specific organs or other body parts more prominent in images. Contrast materials can be given orally, intravenously (IV), or rectally. Following an imaging exam with contrast material, the material is absorbed by the body or eliminated through urine or bowel movements.

For more information, click here.

Does a fluoroscopy exam expose my child to radiation?

Yes. A Fluoroscopy exam is similar to a traditional X-ray.

To learn more about X-ray radiation levels and safety, click here.

How long will my child’s exam last?

The exam’s length is dependent upon the number of images that need to be taken and the type of exam.


Nuclear Medicine

What is Nuclear Medicine? What types of exams are offered?

Nuclear medicine is a field of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive tracer to diagnose a wide range of diseases.

Nuclear Medicine exams include PET-CT, Cardiac Stress Tests and Nuclear Medicine Scans.

Learn more about our Nuclear Medicine services here.

Can I stay in the room with my child?

No. Caregivers must remain in the waiting room until the exam is complete.

How long will my child’s exam last?

The length of the exam depends on the type of exam.

Learn more here.


Bone Densitometry

Can I stay in the room with my child?

For young children, caregivers may remain in the exam room. The technologist will direct you where to stand during the exam. Caregivers may be asked to assist the technologist during the X-ray to aid in the child’s comfort.

How long will my child’s exam last?

Bone densitometry imaging takes about 10 to 30 minutes.

Learn more about this exam here.