Muscle and Joint Pain Treatments

We offer minimally invasive, image-guided treatments for muscle pain and joint pain. We use image guidance to inject anesthetic and steroid in and around the joints and spine (cervical, thoracic and lumbar) to help improve our patients' pain or find the source of the pain, or both. We also provide minimally invasive biopsy services to help diagnose conditions.
Joint Injection

We offer joint injection as a minimally invasive, image-guided therapy to help treat joint pain or to see if the location of the injection is causing you pain. An image-guided joint injection is a shot of an anti-inflammatory steroid medicine that uses fluoroscopy or ultrasound to pinpoint where the needle needs to go and to show the needle’s progress. We often give it with a shot of anesthetic to numb the site of injection.

Trigger Point Injection

We offer trigger point injection as a minimally invasive, image-guided therapy to help treat pain. Using fluoroscopy or ultrasound, one of our radiologists will inject an anti-inflammatory steriod and anesthetic to reduce swelling that may be causing pain.

Biopsy

We offer biopsy to help diagnose problems related to the spine, bones, joints and soft tissue. An image-guided biopsy is a minimally invasive procedure using a needle to draw out fluid or sample tissue for testing. We use imaging technology such as fluoroscopy, CT or ultrasound to guide the needle to the correct spot. 

Botox Injection

We offer Botox injection as a minimally invasive, image-guided therapy to help treat muscle pain. During the procedure, we inject Botox medicine into a muscle to relieve spasms that may be causing you pain. We use ultrasound to guide the needle to the correct spot.

Nerve Treatment

Our team of specialists offers nerve treatment, also known as nerve ablation, as a minimally invasive, image-guided therapy to help treat pain. During the outpatient nerve treatment procedure, a radiologist inserts a radiofrequency probe and uses heat signals to target any nerves that may be causing pain. Once the nerve has been ablated, or turned off, the nerve can no longer transmit pain signals.