Friday, November 30, 2018

'Open Arms'

HELPING HANDS: Building and Grounds staff assist with the installation.

With the heavy-lifting help of the MGH Buildings and Grounds team, a new sculpture has found a home on the Bulfinch Lawn.

The artwork, titled “Open Arms,” is one of the creations of Harold Grinspoon, an entrepreneur, philanthropist, artist and grateful MGH patient whose son is Steven Grinspoon, MD, director of the MGH Program in Nutritional Metabolism.

“The name, ‘Open Arms’ resonates with both our hospital values and for me personally,” said Peter L. Slavin, MD, MGH president. “First and foremost, Mass General is a temple of healing– no matter what our patients look like, what they believe, where they come from or whom they love. The hospital is open to all.”

Grinspoon’s sculptures are made from fallen trees he has come across in the forest surrounding his home, and from Spanish live oaks that he found in the southern U.S. He says he envisions ways to cut and reform the trees to give them a new life. To give back to the MGH – which he says has done so much for him throughout his life – Grinspoon spoke to Brit Nicholson, MD, senior vice president of Development, about displaying one of his sculptures at the hospital.

“During our visit to Harold’s house and studio, we came across one sculpture that really stood out, not only because of its design but also because of its name ‘Open Arms,’” says Nicholson. “Immediately, I was struck, given the credo of the Mass General and what is currently happening in our political climate. It seemed perfect for the hospital.”

GRATEFUL GIFT: From left, Troderman, Nicholson, Harold Grinspoon, Steven Grinspoon, Slavin and Jeremy Ruskin, MD, director, MGH Cardiac Arrhythmia Service

A dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony took place Nov. 26. Hosted by the Development Department, the event honored Grinspoon and his team, his wife Diane Troderman and the MGH Buildings and Grounds crew, whose expertise was cited as being instrumental in the installation of the sculpture. The tree – which will be displayed at the MGH for two years – is one of the Spanish live oaks, and thought to be roughly 200 years old, about the same age as the MGH.

“There is such a sense of history with this tree, we realized if we were going to have a sculpture on the lawn, this was the one to have,” Nicolson says. 



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