Explore the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment

Overview

Our team helps to identify families that may have a hereditary cancer syndrome and, when indicated, provides genetic testing, screening and support. Our certified and licensed genetic counselors are experienced in helping patients gather the information they need to make informed healthcare decisions. We offer hereditary cancer risk assessment, education and genetic testing across a variety of specialty clinics.

Speaking with trained and qualified genetic counselors is of critical importance. Here at Mass General we understand that value and have a significant presence of genetic counselors in cancer to ensure that the right test is administered to the right person at the right time. And, importantly, to ensure that the test results are interpreted accurately and tailored to each patient. Having accurate data and applying it correctly to treatment decisions is of the utmost importance to Mass General. Making sure that you have the best information and can participate in making intelligent, informed decisions is our mission.

Convenient, Multidisciplinary Care

Center for Cancer Risk Assessment (CCRA) patients have access to all of the resources of Mass General Hospital, which means a multidisciplinary team of specialists is available to manage every aspect of your care. If you learn you have a genetic predisposition to cancer, your options for care may include:

  • Ongoing surveillance and monitoring
  • Immediate action and treatment at the appropriate time
  • Prophylactic surgery, care and follow-up
  • Genetic counseling and testing for family members
  • Access to the Mass General Fertility Center's Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Program

Developing Better Therapies through Research

Like all treatment centers within the Cancer Center, our program is highly involved in research. We lead and participate in studies to develop a better understanding of the genetic causes of several cancer syndromes as well as studies to advance cancer treatment and screenings.

Our Clinics

Learn more about the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment Clinics:

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genetics Clinic
Helps to identify families that may have a hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer syndrome and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, cancer screening and support.

Endocrine Tumor Genetics Clinic
Helps to identify families that may have a hereditary risk for endocrine tumors and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, screening and support.

Familial Renal Cell Carcinoma and von Hippel-Lindau Disease Clinic
Helps to identify families that may have a hereditary renal (kidney) cancer syndrome and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, screening and support.

Gastrointestinal Cancer Genetics Clinic
Helps identify families that may have a hereditary colon or gastrointestinal cancer syndrome and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, cancer screening and support.

Melanoma Genetics Clinic
Helps to identify families that may have a hereditary melanoma syndrome and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, cancer screening and support.

Neuro-Oncology Genetics Clinic
Offers genetic counseling and testing for patients with neurofibromatosis (NF1, NF2, schwannomatosis) as well as those with strong personal and family histories of cancers of the central nervous system.

Prostate Cancer Genetics Clinic
Helps to identify families that may have a hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer and, when indicated, offer genetic testing, cancer screening and support.


Patient Education & Resources

What does it mean to have an inherited risk for cancer? What is genetic counseling? Find out the answers to these questions and more, answered by our team of certified genetic counselors.

Supportive Care

Supportive Care

We offer a variety of education and support resources to help you and your family.

PACT

PACT

This program provides support for cancer patients who have children in their lives.

Px

Px

A simple way to connect with the various resources available to you at the Cancer Center.

National Society of Genetic Counselors

National Society of Genetic Counselors

Read about the purpose of genetic counseling and find a genetic counselor in your area.

National Cancer Institute

National Cancer Institute

Information page on cancer genetics.

American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society

Patient-friendly information on hereditary cancer and genetics.

Genetics Home Reference

Genetics Home Reference

Consumer-friendly information on genetic syndromes.

GINAhelp

GINAhelp

Information on the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008.


Video

Learn more about the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment and find out what it means to have an inherited risk for cancer.


News, Updates & Events

Join Us!

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Pancreatic Cancer: Your Family, Genes, and Cancer Risk
Simches Research Center, 3rd Floor | Charles River Plaza
185 Cambridge Street | Boston

Join the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment (CCRA) for a free conference for patients and families to learn about the most recent updates in hereditary cancer risk assessment for pancreatic cancer from experts in the field.

Learn more.

Multi-gene panel testing for hereditary ovarian cancer predisposition

Have you considered whether your genetic risk assessment for hereditary ovarian cancer is up to date?

Genetic testing technology tends to change rapidly. Multi-gene panels are one technological advancement that has reshaped the landscape of genetic testing in recent years. Multi-gene panels allow many hereditary cancer risk genes to be analyzed by a single test. Before multi-gene panels became available, BRCA1 and BRCA2 were commonly the only genes tested in individuals with a personal and/or family history of ovarian cancer.

Within the last five years, multi-gene panels have been widely adopted as a tool for evaluating hereditary cancer risk. Besides BRCA1 and BRCA2, several other genes are typically included in an ovarian cancer gene panel. These include genes linked to Lynch syndrome (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM), which confer an estimated 4-24% lifetime risk of ovarian cancer. Additionally, ovarian cancer gene panels often include RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1, genes that confer an estimated 6-8% lifetime risk of ovarian cancer.

If you or a relative has had ovarian cancer and it has been more than 3-5 years since your last genetic risk assessment, you may be a candidate for updated genetic testing. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a genetic counselor to discuss the option of genetic testing in more detail, please contact the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment at 617-724-1971.

Updated risk assessment guidelines for hereditary prostate cancer.

Recent studies have uncovered important new information about hereditary prostate cancer highlighting the value of offering genetic testing to men with prostate cancer.

One important study (Prichard et. al, 2016) showed that about 12% of men with metastatic prostate cancer carry mutations in genes involved with DNA repair. The study not only revealed new hereditary prostate cancer genes, but also demonstrated that hereditary prostate cancer may be more common than previously understood.

Additional studies have defined the features of hereditary prostate cancer including: metastatic prostate cancer, high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason score of 7 or higher), and men with prostate cancer who also have a family history of breast, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate or other cancers. This has led to a better understanding of which men are most likely to have a hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer and should be offered genetic testing.

There are several reasons why men with prostate cancer may benefit from genetic testing. First, the results of genetic testing can guide decision-making related to the prostate cancer treatment. Next, results could uncover that the patient is at increased risk for other cancer types and would benefit from additional cancer screenings. Finally, the results of genetic testing can have important medical implications for family members. With this new evidence, many insurance companies cover the cost of genetic testing.

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) now recommends that anyone with metastatic prostate cancer be referred for genetic counseling and consider to the option of genetic testing.

Given the large number of patients with prostate cancer who could benefit from genetic counseling and testing, the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment established the Hereditary Prostate Cancer Clinic in 2017, under the leadership of Dr. Matthew Smith, Oncologist and Director of the Genitourinary Malignancies Program in the Mass General Cancer Center. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a genetic counselor to discuss the option of genetic testing in more detail, please contact the Center for Cancer Risk Assessment at 617-724-1971.

Direct to Consumer (DTC) genetic testing: What to know and where to go?

Gifted an at-home genetic test during the holidays and now want to know more about your results? Ancestry and other at-home DNA testing services can be fascinating tools to learn more about yourself and your family, but the information can also be complex. It's important to consider that many at-home DNA tests are different from most clinical tests and, therefore, should not be used for clinical management without consulting a genetics professional. Here at MGH, our team specializes in the genetics of cancer risk for those who have a personal and/or family history of cancer, but there are genetic counselors who routinely provide consultations for DTC-related inquiries. We are always happy to put individuals in contact with the most appropriate providers for learning about their results.

If you have done or are considering an at-home DNA test, below are some resources that might address some of the unique questions that can arise regarding DTC testing: